Raw Paleo Diet to Suit You > Carnivorous / Zero Carb Approach

Nunavut Inuits eating raw trout and raw caribou liver in the tundra

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PaleoPhil:

--- Quote from: William on February 06, 2010, 11:15:55 pm ---I can't watch the video because I am on dialup. I relied on your description of what the Inuk said and did.

--- End quote ---
That explains it. I'll add more context. The Inuit hunter wasn't asking what the flowers were, he was teaching about them--showing the cameraman what the caribou that they had filmed in that spot had been eating, picking a little white flower from the tundra vegetation and then eating a couple. He was chewing and pensive for a bit, then he said that the flowers were dry. There was no further explanation, so I was curious if that was just supposed to be informative for the nature show or whether it's useful in hunting somehow. Basically, I'd like to know more about what he was getting at.


--- Quote from: William on February 06, 2010, 07:46:17 am ---Quote from: PaleoPhil on Yesterday at 04:56:45 PM
It's a moot point anyway as regards the Inuit because now we have evidence of Inuit themselves eating stomach contents and I doubt they just started that practice.

I don't believe it.
I've seen the stuff that caribou eat, heard a biologist(?) describe it as miniature trees, moss, and it just ain't edible unless you have the digestive system of a herbivore. ...
--- End quote ---
Do you have a source you can direct us to? Bear in mind that the stomach contents are partially fermented, which might make them more digestible.

I should note, BTW, that I'm not saying that just because some Inuit folk eat something that we should necessarily eat it too. No single source of information should be relied upon as magical dogma. In my own case, I don't do well eating carbs so low-carb cultures like the Arctic culture are more relevant to my situation. I've only been eating VLC for a year or so, whereas the indigenous Arctic cultures have been doing it for thousands of years, so there are probably some "tricks of the trade" that I can learn from them.

roony:

--- Quote from: miles on February 05, 2010, 10:18:33 pm ---That is interesting considering how people here keep saying not to worry about trichinella/osis/parasites...

Even if you say that: It isn't safe to eat a bear because its' digestive system, as a carnivore, would be similar to ours so parasites which survived within it could survive in us too; what does the polar bear eat? Does it not get its' trichinosis from herbivorous animals? Even if not, then the carnivorous animal it got it from must've got the trichinosis from a herbivore.

A side: All these people seem to boil their meat as opposed to roasting it. To stop it burning? I would've thought some stuff'd be lost in the water though. They cook it right through as well, but light.

--- End quote ---

Trichinosis is vitamin a poisoning, nothing to do with bacteria ...

miles:
Who said anything about bacteria? Trichinosis is what you are suffering from when you are infested with trichinella, or tapeworms. They stick to your intestines, eat your food, can grow there large in both length and diameter. They can hatch eggs which can go in to your blood-stream and form cysts in your body-tissue, waiting to be eaten by another animal when you die. Segments also detach in to your faeces for a similar purpose. When Trichinella have grown large, like snakes and then been deprived of food, they've been known to burrow their way out of people, or sometimes surface through their mouth.

However, if you know otherwise and would like to share and elaborate then I am listening...

Hannibal:
Although it seems that trichinella is a "bad guy" there are natural methods to get rid of these tapeworms - some good clays (bentonite, green), anti-parasite herbs - wild animals do eat them to cleanse theire bodies of some hostile intruders, some unhealthy substances, etc.

roony:

--- Quote from: miles on February 07, 2010, 02:45:27 am ---Who said anything about bacteria? Trichinosis is what you are suffering from when you are infested with trichinella, or tapeworms. They stick to your intestines, eat your food, can grow there large in both length and diameter. They can hatch eggs which can go in to your blood-stream and form cysts in your body-tissue, waiting to be eaten by another animal when you die. Segments also detach in to your faeces for a similar purpose. When Trichinella have grown large, like snakes and then been deprived of food, they've been known to burrow their way out of people, or sometimes surface through their mouth.

However, if you know otherwise and would like to share and elaborate then I am listening...

--- End quote ---

Yea thats correct, need to eat ... lol


As for boiling liver's, i doubt it has anything to do with parasites or tapeworms, & more with vitamin a, as we're not able to secrete vitamin a very efficiently


"You must remember that Vitamin A and D are not soluble in water so if someone takes more quantities of these vitamins than required, there is no way they can be excreted. They generally are stored in the liver. On the other hand Vitamins B and C are water soluble vitamins. If someone takes enormous quantities of Vitamin B and C, they would be excreted in urine.”

“Oh, I see. So this means Vitamin A can act as a poison too?”

“Oh yes. Certainly. This is a fact which most people do not know. The medical condition which results from an intake of excessive amounts of Vitamin A is known as Hypervitaminosis A. About one million I.U. of vitamin A are very toxic to human beings, and about 3 million I.U. may prove fatal, as they have in the case of Ramlal. To put it another way, about a year’s requirement of Vitamin A if taken as a single dose may prove toxic, and about three years’ requirement taken as a single dose may kill a human being. Well, we do say often that ‘too much of a good thing can be bad’. Nowhere does this maxim prove truer than in the case of Vitamin A.”


“Tarun, I did not tell you a very interesting fact. Most polar animals such as polar bears have dangerously high levels of Vitamin A in their liver. In fact there have been cases, where polar explorers have died of Vitamin A poisoning, because they ate the livers of animals residing in those regions.”

“Really? That’s an interesting fact. How does such dangerous amounts of Vitamin A reach their liver?”

“Vitamin A originates in marine algae, and then passes up the food chain to reach the large carnivorous animals. Toxic levels of Vitamin A may accumulate in the livers of a wide range of creatures such as Polar bears, seals, porpoises, dolphins, sharks, whales, Arctic foxes and huskies.

Even a small meal of southern Australian seal liver, say 80 g, may produce illness in man. I may tell you that several foods are recommended as good sources of Vitamin A. Most of them contain well below the toxic levels of vitamin A, but one - Halibut liver oil - contains dangerously high amounts of Vitamin A, as you can see from the accompanying table. "

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