Author Topic: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers  (Read 103730 times)

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Online TylerDurden

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High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« on: August 06, 2008, 10:15:32 PM »
High-Meat Preparation Notes:-


First get hold of a properly sealable container(eg:- vacuum-jar/sealable plastic box/Bell Jar etc.). Fill half of the box with the raw meats you want to age - make sure to leave 50% of the box unfilled, so as to ensure that there is enough air/oxygen for the bacteria - it's a very bad idea not to leave enough (fresh)air for the bacteria to work on. Then place the high-meat container in the fridge. Make sure to take the container out and air the box outside , at least once every 1 to 3 days for a few minutes, depending on your whim - properly airing the meats outside helps to refresh the air within the box, allowing the bacteria to continue their work, and the more frequently you air it, the faster it ripens - don't air it inside the house as that will stink out the place. Oh, and don't forget to cut up the fresh, raw meats into  mouthful-sized pieces before you start using it for "high-meat" - otherwise, it's a rather messy business to cut it all up once it's reached the "high-meat" stage - though, I suppose, one can wait, instead, until it eventually becomes liquid, where one just needs a spoon.

Generally speaking, if the fridge is not at too cold a setting, and if the high-meat container is aired frequently, then it's usually recommended to wait c.1  month before trying it. I find that I get the beneficial effects from the high-meat within c.2-3 weeks after storing it, usually once the outer surface of the aged ,raw meats has become slimy enough, but with the rest of the meat still being quite solid enough to be picked up by a fork - I generally don't like the texture of "high-meat" once it becomes too liquidy. Though, there are some who prefer aging the "high-meat" for several months.

A few people wish to speed up the process by storing the "high-meat" container outside the fridge in the open air, but this is fraught with difficulty as flies are fiendishly clever at laying their almost unnoticeable eggs around the lid, and these can then so easily drop in. It's been suggested by one member of the group that the container in question should be sealed within two separate black bin-bags so as to deter the flies. Plus, when I left high-meat outside, it seemed more likely to go dry, and dried out high-meat is useless re getting the boosts in mood etc.

(I should also mention that I personally only got the fullest benefit from "high-meat" once I started eating c. two (cubic-inch-sized?)chunks of "high-meat" each day, and that the effects, oddly, seemed to only start being noticed after c.12-24 hours. Obviously, though, everyone is different, in this regard).

"High-meat" can be made from pretty much any raw-animal-food-source. The Eskimoes used to age raw fish in this way, the Chinese would age their raw eggs for decades, the French often age their raw cheeses until they become very stinky etc.. I personally found most "high-meats" versions to be a problem for me(especially any "high-meat"-muscle-meats), with the exception of aged kidney, aged tongue, and especially aged ox/beef heart - I use the latter most of the time, for reasons of taste and convenience. I would strongly recommend that people experiment with a wide variety of "high-meats" before they find the one that is least appalling re taste.

 Virtually everyone finds "high-meat" a problem at first, re taste, due to past conditioning. My own solution, at the start, was to cut the meats up into very tiny slivers  so that I could just swallow them very quickly without having to endure the taste for long. I'd then follow up each mouthful with a big gulp of alkaline (spring) mineral-water in order to blot out the after-taste. Naturally, over a certain length of time, I got used to the taste and no longer need to cut up the meat into such tiny slices or chase each piece with water, and, nowadays, I even relish the rather acidic taste of some kinds of "high-meat", viewing it as a useful alternative to smelly raw cheeses(I happen to be allergic to raw dairy).

Naturally, there are always going to be some  who feel they won't ever be able to get used to such fare, so I would strongly recommend that such people buy "EM" products, instead, or, (powerful) probiotic supplements. "EM" stands for effective microorganisms. However, I'm sceptical re the efficacy of the latter two, by comparison to "high-meat", and view them as substitutes only - besides, "EM" products are rather expensive and difficult to prepare, whereas "high-meat" is relatively easy to make.

The benefits of the extra bacteria from "high-meat" include better digestion, and increased concentration, energy-levels and improvement in mood. Here's a standard news-report re a study describing  how  bacteria help improve one's mood:-


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1547346/Getting-dirty-could-prevent-depression.html








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Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2008, 10:40:02 PM »
Now here's a question...
is there a distinct advantage to high meat over other fermented foods such as pickles, sauerkraut, etc.? (providing they are unheated and one is not on an all-meat diet)

I've just started eating sauerkraut and pickles as they are supposed to contain live enzymes and beneficial probiotics, and I'm wondering if high meat is truly superior

Satya

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2008, 10:45:59 PM »
Thanks, Tyler.  How about a picture of some high meat?

Keith, pickles are anaerobic lactofermented foods, high meat is an aerobic fermentation.  You are supposed to get air to the meat (Tyler would know more on the particulars, as I have not tried high meat yet).  So different bacteria are involved (and that is the extent of my knowledge on the subject).  And believe me, there ain't much info out there on high meat, so the more input we have from our rpd community, the better!

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #3 on: August 06, 2008, 10:52:06 PM »
You're sure right about there not being that much info!

I've tried searching quite a few times, and I always find message boards talking about some show where they showed people eating raw meat and high meat and everyone is just talking about how disgusting and unsanitary and unhealthy it is  :D

But no real info  :'(

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #4 on: August 06, 2008, 10:58:45 PM »
Now here's a question...
is there a distinct advantage to high meat over other fermented foods such as pickles, sauerkraut, etc.? (providing they are unheated and one is not on an all-meat diet)

I've just started eating sauerkraut and pickles as they are supposed to contain live enzymes and beneficial probiotics, and I'm wondering if high meat is truly superior

I think the idea is that different types of fermented foods will provide different types of useful bacteria for the gut. I, for example, would not benefit one bit from bacteria designed to digest raw dairy better.
“If you invade Iraq, “You are going to be the proud owner of 25 million people. You will own all their hopes, aspirations, and problems.”  Common-sense Colin Powell comments  to a moronic George W Bush.

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #5 on: August 06, 2008, 11:04:09 PM »
Thanks, Tyler.  How about a picture of some high meat?

Keith, pickles are anaerobic lactofermented foods, high meat is an aerobic fermentation.  You are supposed to get air to the meat (Tyler would know more on the particulars, as I have not tried high meat yet).  So different bacteria are involved (and that is the extent of my knowledge on the subject).  And believe me, there ain't much info out there on high meat, so the more input we have from our rpd community, the better!


I don't have anything good enough to take a decent picture and anyway I'm not in a high-meat phase right now. Here's a picture of a rotten-fish dish from Thailand which will have to do for now:-

http://eatingasia.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/pla_raa_1.jpg

(it's called "bplaa raa"(means rotting fish in thai language).

Here's a picture of aged "century eggs":-

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0c/Sliced_century_egg_by_.Florian.jpg/800px-Sliced_century_egg_by_.Florian.jpg

(Please can someone do something about this annoying thing that happens where if you try to click the send button it states that someone's already posted before - I've lost data before because of this and I loathe having to repost everything).
“If you invade Iraq, “You are going to be the proud owner of 25 million people. You will own all their hopes, aspirations, and problems.”  Common-sense Colin Powell comments  to a moronic George W Bush.

Offline PaleoKyle

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2008, 07:39:06 AM »

(Before/after) This is 1 week old high meat (done outside the refrigerator) the temps were pretty warm so it is nice and high. I started with 2lbs of round roast. I put it in a gallon canning jar and aired it 2-3 times a day tasting the meat as I went. Personally I don't mind the muscle meat, I can actually chew it. I need to try the organs...though I tend to eat those up to fast to make high.

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2008, 08:14:19 AM »
Hey, thanks Dude!  Show it again over time, if you get the chance.

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2008, 08:27:52 AM »
Is it best to use less fatty meat when making high meat, or does it not matter?
Round cuts are usually pretty lean, and organs typically don't have much fat.

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2008, 04:04:42 PM »
Is it best to use less fatty meat when making high meat, or does it not matter?
Round cuts are usually pretty lean, and organs typically don't have much fat.


It'd probably be better to use lean as animal fat doesn't seem to ever rot. I've had suet in the fridge for lengthy times and the meat on it will get high but the fat stays the same.

Offline wodgina

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2008, 05:39:00 PM »



It'd probably be better to use lean as animal fat doesn't seem to ever rot. I've had suet in the fridge for lengthy times and the meat on it will get high but the fat stays the same.
Thats weird, my suet turns green in about 3 days,Is the meat on your suet from kidneys  Craig?
My suet comes with traces of kidney on it. No actual muscle meat.
I freeze most of my suet straight away because of this.
Muscle meat left in my fridge will last 7+ days.
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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2008, 05:53:42 PM »
Thats weird, my suet turns green in about 3 days,Is the meat on your suet from kidneys  Craig?
My suet comes with traces of kidney on it. No actual muscle meat.
I freeze most of my suet straight away because of this.
Muscle meat left in my fridge will last 7+ days.

I think it's kidney suet. Not 100% sure. It does have some traces of tissue attached. When I cut it into pieces, I've noticed the fat with little tissue will last almost forever in the fridge without stinking the whole place up though it does stink a wee bit. I attributed that to the small amounts of connective tissue that holds the fat chunks together.  If I leave the whole chunk in there, with pieces of tissue, it gets very smelly and high after a while.

Offline rawlion

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2008, 07:05:24 PM »
High meat by Aajonus:

"Place 1 volume pint of raw meat, chopped into bite sized pieces, into a glass quart jar: equal air and meat space. Place Ball jar lid on jar tightly and place in refrigerator. I suggest three jars be prepared; one with raw meat, one with natural raw fowl and one with ocean wild caught raw fish. Every 3-4 days take the jar outdoors, completely remove lids and wave the jars in the air to exchange the air inside the jars. Return lids to jars, tighten and return to refrigeration. After 4 weeks, you may begin to eat one marble sized piece once or twice every week. There are approximately 17 stages of bacterial developments. Airing the meat is required to progress the bacteria through the stages....."

I would only add ENJOY!

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Offline stevesurv

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2008, 09:48:23 AM »
Is there a real difference between high meat made from frozen or fresh meat besides flavor?

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2008, 04:51:38 PM »
Is there a real difference between high meat made from frozen or fresh meat besides flavor?

I've tried using frozen meat as a starter for high-meat and it just didn't seem to work.
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Offline stevesurv

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2008, 06:25:23 PM »
I've tried using frozen meat as a starter for high-meat and it just didn't seem to work.

Well what do you mean by that?

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2008, 09:47:30 PM »
Well what do you mean by that?

I can't remember exactly. This was years ago, when I first started to experiment with high-meat. It just didn't seem to provide the same benefits re boosted concentration/energy-levels etc. as "normal" high-meat. Try it, anyway, if you feel like it.
“If you invade Iraq, “You are going to be the proud owner of 25 million people. You will own all their hopes, aspirations, and problems.”  Common-sense Colin Powell comments  to a moronic George W Bush.

Offline Neone

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2009, 06:15:42 AM »
I use mason jars and bison heart. Chunk up the heart and fill the jar half full. I leave mine on the bench and air it out once a day (although i forget to some days). If you're worried about fly eggs (which i havent had a problem with yet) then put some wax paper or something elastic banded around the lid. It only takes a few days and its starting to get pretty high. I like this way because i (a) dont have a fridge (b) it only takes a few days instead of a month.
That's not paleo.

Offline yon yonson

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2009, 08:02:09 AM »
I use mason jars and bison heart. Chunk up the heart and fill the jar half full. I leave mine on the bench and air it out once a day (although i forget to some days). If you're worried about fly eggs (which i havent had a problem with yet) then put some wax paper or something elastic banded around the lid. It only takes a few days and its starting to get pretty high. I like this way because i (a) dont have a fridge (b) it only takes a few days instead of a month.
after seeing this i thought i'd give it a try. i used the same exact proceder: cut up bison heart and put it in a mason jar outside the fridge. i didnt not put it in extra bags though and don't have any maggots so far. it's been 3 days and its getting pretty high. i tried a piece today and it was actually pretty good. didn't smell as rotten as i thought it would, it's more complicated smell. also, i've noticed little bubbles in the juices, i assume that's a good sign of fermentation. anyways, i recommend this method. thanks neone!

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2009, 06:25:11 AM »
High-Meat Preparation Notes:-

First get hold of a properly sealable container(eg:- vacuum-jar/sealable plastic box/Bell Jar etc.). Fill half of the box with the raw meats you want to age - make sure to leave 50% of the box unfilled, so as to ensure that there is enough air/oxygen for the bacteria - it's a very bad idea not to leave enough (fresh)air for the bacteria to work on. Then place the high-meat container in the fridge. Make sure to take the container out and air the box outside , at least once every 1 to 3 days for a few minutes, ...


I'm no expert on this stuff, but based on what I've been reading, I'm not sure that a sealable plastic box or vacuum-sealable containers are such a good idea. It sounds like the traditional Inuit containers were leaky and that this was a good thing. Now that more of them are using sealable plastic, botulism has become a problem, according to reports like the one below. The problem is, a loose top will likely result in a stinky fridge, right? Seems like a catch-22 for us who don't have a cellar that no one will mind if we stink it up. Botulism poisoning is rare, but I remember my high school biology teacher saying that it's one of the most potent organic toxins on earth.

Quote
Traditional "stink" foods such as fermented salmon eggs (stink eggs) or salmon heads (stink heads) are prepared by burial in moss-lined pits or barrels in the ground. Nelson (1971) described the process he observed during a visit to the coastal villages of northwest Alaska in 1878-1881: "In the district between the Yukon and Kuskokwim, the heads of king salmon, taken in the summer, are placed in small pits in the ground surrounded by straw and covered with turf. They are kept there during the summer and in the autumn have decayed until even the bones have become the same consistency as the general mass. They are taken out and kneaded in a wooden tray until they form a pasty compound and are eaten as a favorite dish by some of the people."

The process described by Nelson has changed somewhat. Now, fermentation is usually carried out in either a barrel, a plastic or glass jar, or a plastic bag. These containers increase the risk of botulism toxin formation because most can be easily sealed, thereby increasing the likelihood of anaerobic conditions. Some foods are fermented in a seal skin or fish skin bag or "poke" which is either buried or hung up. If salmon eggs are fermented in this manner, they can be left until they dry out somewhat and form a "cheese" which is firm on the outside and soft in the center.

Toxin production is also temperature dependent, and is less likely to occur at the lower temperatures used during traditional fermentation. However, fermentation now may be done indoors, or in a container above ground and in the sun. These methods involve warmer temperatures which make fermentation more rapid and production of botulism toxin more likely.

Botulism in Alaska: A Guide for Physicians and Health Care Providers - 1998 Update
http://www.epi.alaska.gov/pubs/botulism/bot_03.htm
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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2009, 05:32:50 PM »
I'm no expert on this stuff, but based on what I've been reading, I'm not sure that a sealable plastic box or vacuum-sealable containers are such a good idea. It sounds like the traditional Inuit containers were leaky and that this was a good thing. Now that more of them are using sealable plastic, botulism has become a problem, according to reports like the one below. The problem is, a loose top will likely result in a stinky fridge, right? Seems like a catch-22 for us who don't have a cellar that no one will mind if we stink it up. Botulism poisoning is rare, but I remember my high school biology teacher saying that it's one of the most potent organic toxins on earth.


I don't think it matters. The main point is to aerate the container fully for a few minutes at least every 3 or 4 days, and people like me actually prefer aerating the meats once a day. The bacteria only need a certain amount of air, which just needs refreshing once in a while.
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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2009, 07:20:38 AM »
I don't think it matters. The main point is to aerate the container fully for a few minutes at least every 3 or 4 days, and people like me actually prefer aerating the meats once a day. The bacteria only need a certain amount of air, which just needs refreshing once in a while.
Well it matters for people like me who tend to forget about things and could easily leave it in the fridge for a week before remembering. :D Surely I'm not the only one with a bad memory from years on a SAD?
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Offline yon yonson

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #22 on: October 20, 2009, 10:20:47 PM »
Question:i've got a jar of high meat going right now but i want to make some more. can i just add some fresh meat into the same jar? or is it recommended to start a new batch? i would think it'd be fine to just add some fresh meat into the old one... especially if it's a good batch (then the high meat can inoculate the fresh meat). suggestions?

Offline Hannibal

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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #23 on: October 21, 2009, 12:21:38 AM »
I don't think it matters. The main point is to aerate the container fully for a few minutes at least every 3 or 4 days, and people like me actually prefer aerating the meats once a day. The bacteria only need a certain amount of air, which just needs refreshing once in a while.
But if meat is aging in some warm temperatures (20-30 degrees C) one has to aerate it much more often
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Re: High-Meat-Recipe Preparation For More Advanced RAFers
« Reply #24 on: October 21, 2009, 03:42:47 AM »
    I do it twice a day. 
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