Poll

Did you read GC Burger's first book?

I did read it and I agree with him.
I did read it and I partly agree with him (please expound).
I did read it but I disagree with him (please explain why).
I didn’t read it but nevertheless I agree with him.
I didn’t read it and I don’t know what he says but I disagree with him.
I didn’t read it and I don’t care.

Author Topic: Who has read GC Burger's main book?  (Read 12447 times)

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Offline Alive

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Re: Who has read GC Burger's first book?
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2012, 03:55:52 am »
Very interesting idea that slight chemical damage from cooking could be worse than major damage!

This idea fits in well with the observations that minuscule amounts of some chemicals (especially pesticides) can be worse than larger amounts as they slip by the body defenses unnoticed.

As an idea to communicate to cooked foodies I have been imagining making a video of two craft kit sets - say something natural of wood, wool etc - one is heated to 180C for an hour and then you get to follow the assembly instructions.

One kit can be made correctly as intended, the other one is charred, shrunk, twisted, and doesn't fit together properly any more. How about heating your house, clothes, car etc to 180C to see they are improved  :o

 

Offline Iguana

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Re: Who has read GC Burger's main book?
« Reply #26 on: May 01, 2016, 05:57:50 pm »
A fully revised and corrected English translation is available on pdf for the forum members who ask me and provide me their e-mail address — we can't attach documents on PMs.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline LePatron7

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Re: Who has read GC Burger's main book?
« Reply #27 on: July 03, 2016, 11:35:16 pm »
I did read part of it, and I partially agree with him.

I think taste and smell play a huge role in whether something is needed by the body/beneficial. For example there are studies showing mice deprived of water and electrolytes, once given the option to drink plain water or water with electrolytes, choose water with electrolytes. There's other factors too, like a person who is tired is more likely to feel sleepy. Essentially instincts, when 'listened' to, give ques for what the body needs/benefits most from.

However I partially disagree with him, because in a way I feel like he may have 'set restrictions' for certain foods that perhaps shouldn't have been restricted. Not cooked food, but perhaps salt, occasionally sprouted grains. There's also the factor of food scarcity and every food not always being available. I believe there is room for improvement in his diet, but that there is strong premise for his concepts making sense.

In this regard, I believe there is something to eating instinctively, and also living instinctively.
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.

Nocebo Effect - a detrimental effect on health produced by psychological or psychosomatic factors such as negative expectations of treatment or prognosis

Med free since 03/21/2014

Offline Iguana

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Re: Who has read GC Burger's main book?
« Reply #28 on: April 10, 2017, 02:19:46 am »
Salt in natural forms such as sea water or in seaweeds is not restricted. But seasoning foods with salt or whatever, is restricted because it's a way of processing foodstuffs which is relatively very new in the evolution of animals on Earth and experiments have shown that it fools our instinctive regulation as well as that of animals.

Experiments have also shown the troubles induced by wheat, sprouted or not, but an occasional consumption in of other unheated grains just soaked or sprouted hasn't triggered any troubles.

By the way, the revised and corrected English translation of GCB's main and first book is still available for free in pdf for the members who ask me. 
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler