Author Topic: A day in the life of TylerDurden  (Read 129227 times)

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Offline prowler

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #800 on: November 18, 2011, 07:44:50 PM »
Why bother? Let simple people live their simple lifes.

Offline Dorothy

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #801 on: November 19, 2011, 03:21:52 AM »
If I'm buying something at the farmer's market that I know is available and ready I say straight out that I'm eating it raw so that if there is something substandard or of concern about the meat I can find out. Usually, the vendor responds very well and suggests what probably would be best if eaten raw.

However, if I am searching for something special or for organs I always say that it is for my dogs. It's never a lie because my dogs do get some. The difference is that they are willing to get and sell me much more if it only has to be quality enough for a dog or a kind of food that is accepted for dogs. They are afraid of getting in trouble otherwise - which is very easy to understand. If they sell me something that I get sick from that isn't an accepted human food they could be held accountable. It's not fair - but in our litigious and rule-based society - it's just the way it is. Farmers are really under the microscope and it's hard enough being a small farmer these days without making yourself more vulnerable to the USDA, FDA and crazy people with lawyers.

Trust has to be built up. I buy it for my dogs and try it on them first. Then I try just a little and see if it's ok for me. Then I eat more. Then husband eats it. Then I go back and say that we've been enjoying the meat raw and it's amazing and we feel really good. Then they can breath a bit easier and are willing to do more.

Another thing you can do is say that you like your meat extremely rare. That also is quite true and has most of the same dangers that raw does - so you can get a real feel of the quality by watching the person's face. If it's not good enough to be eaten very rare, it's not good enough to eat raw. Rare is a word that is accepted in our society.

Offline Paleo Donk

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #802 on: November 19, 2011, 03:25:24 AM »
The last time I bought some raw wild game, I had one of the butchers ask me how I cooked the meats, as they occasionally do. I rarely have the guts to state that I eat it raw, so I just stand there, usually, quite speechless. The trouble is that if I'm honest, then that just causes more problems.



Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #803 on: November 19, 2011, 04:37:59 AM »
ROFL paleodonk.  That's not very nice, but it was funny.

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #804 on: December 06, 2011, 01:32:38 AM »
One other thing I started noticed after going on this diet for several years was that, whenever I ate cooked food, especially highly processed cooked food, I would be usually likely to get gas coming up into the mouth, causing me to vomit it out if I overate more than a little bit at a time.This was a useful disincentive re eating more of it. I wonder if this is just that the body no longer feels the need to make the extra effort to digest cooked foods once one is mostly raw, as it's a strain on the body, so that  various extra processes needed to properly digest cooked foods are omitted.
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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #805 on: December 14, 2011, 12:54:15 AM »
I also notice an increase in heat after I eat cooked foods.
“Tolerance only for those who agree with you is no tolerance at all.”
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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #806 on: December 14, 2011, 01:27:14 AM »
I also got an unusual question on one of my other websites:-

"   I am a meat dept. manager. A customer asked me for the best meat to eat raw. She stated that another store recommended sirloin steak. I recommended filet mignon, which was too expensive for her. She also asked and bought a mock tender or chuck tender roast. I recommended and sold her a tri-tip roast. She wanted to make kabobs. She asked if I recommended vinegar. I told her I would find out for her.
What is the best raw meat to eat raw?
Is there a process, such as vinegar, to prepare the type of meat?"

If anyone can provide me with other data, I would be much obliged. So far, I have told him that a small portion of cooked-food-eaters will prefer eating raw meat only from fat-free cuts, such as fillet steak/filet mignon, but that most will not mind fattier cuts. I also told him that raw-meat-dieters would not care a damn what cuts of meat they got for mincing, and that they would simply go in for the cheapest cuts of meat.  If anyone has any further comments to add re this, I would be most grateful...
“Tolerance only for those who agree with you is no tolerance at all.”
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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #807 on: December 14, 2011, 04:03:06 AM »
It depends on the person.  Most people prefer more tender cuts.  I personally enjoy brisket and hanger steak.

Offline Adora

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #808 on: December 14, 2011, 05:39:55 AM »
      I like all sorts of junk in my cut of meat. I like hard chewy tendonous, stuff that I gnaw on awhile then just swallow. I like chunks of hard fat on the outside or the thick lines of it that run through it. I like the heart best b/c it has very tender spots, thick fat, little ropey chordae tendineae, even a little rubbery vena cava. I feel like most people would find it gross, but I always liked mixed textures. I like chicken cartilage, always did, that really bugged folks, so I would go in after others had left that a dig in, now I eat all the "best" parts I want first and cook the rest for family. When I ate SAD I would mix all sorts of nuts and berries into granola, with flakes, then mix yogurt and milk. That satisfied the texture thing then and this is what satisfies it now.
Some people really like smooth stuff,  that kind of person might be raw Filet Mignon.
Also, if it's their first time eating raw meat they would probably appreciate the filet mignon, b/c mentally it's less of a leap. I still like to dip meat in a fatty, creamy sauce, like herbed sour cream, or Dijon mustard, or creamy horseradish sauce.
If she was making raw kabobs, I think a dipping oil or sauce would be better than a vinegar dip or marinade
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Offline Lascjp

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #809 on: December 14, 2011, 09:15:44 AM »
Did you ask the butcher what the woman's criteria for the "best" type of meat to eat raw was?

If she's talking about flavor then fatty of course.

If she's talking about tenderness, well that'll vary by breed. But you know which cuts are tenderest raw as well as I do. Of course that's not that important as cooking is what toughens meat, at least initially.

If she's talking about safety obviously that point is moot.

Been RVAF since Nov '07. Taught myself with the internet, and by experimenting. All healed up now, except I'm sure there's still some gunk in here to detox but for the most part, all healthy!
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #810 on: December 14, 2011, 10:01:22 AM »
The mention of vinegar suggests to me that the customer is thinking that special preparation is necessary involving an acid, such as with ceviche. As you are probably aware, vinegar and lemon "cook" food, in a sense, without heat and may kill some pathogens, though not likely all. If it makes the customer feel more at ease about it they could take that transitional step and then if they feel more courageous later they could try really raw.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #811 on: December 14, 2011, 11:04:56 AM »
My choice is rump roast, so tri-tip is in the right area, AFAIC. From this area comes the nice, large roasts which are easy to cut up into kabob cubes.

I didn't notice mention of "grass-fed," so if that needs to be specified, I would bring it up.

If the customer has internet, have the butcher send her here. I have learned so much about things that I wouldn't have thought about asking.
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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #812 on: December 14, 2011, 03:46:13 PM »
Well, I sent off my answer. PP may be right, the mention of vinegar suggests to me that she was no raw foodist.

“Tolerance only for those who agree with you is no tolerance at all.”
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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #813 on: January 06, 2012, 05:42:41 AM »
I am in the middle of a 7-day water-fast. I have previously been eating too many carbs and cooked foods given the Christmas period  - plus I have been overindulging on raw foods, so this is all useful. I am now several days into it, and am experiencing the "ketosis" effect I usually get when I fast for a few days(ie heightened concentration levels etc.). If this is what RZCers experience all the time, then I envy them as my own RZC experiment was not successful.
“Tolerance only for those who agree with you is no tolerance at all.”
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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #814 on: January 06, 2012, 05:50:29 AM »
I got an unusual question from allexperts.com which I thought I would put here since I think others will be able to provide additional useful info:-

"I live in an area where grass fed beef is cheap and easily available.  I read about how fermentation of cod liver (cod liver oil) boosts the vitamin K2 content.  Fermenting soy beans in rice straw (natto) also creates large amounts of vitamin K2.  I want to ferment beef liver and see if the same thing happens.  Beef liver is a lot easier to procure than fish liver.

I have a beef liver sitting out in my truck.  Any recommendations on how to ferment it?  For cod livers, the procedure seems to have been dump them in a barrel of sea water and leave it outdoors for a year.  That sounds similar to a pickling brine.  Should I just brine it the way I would for making regular pickles?

My goal isn't to have something edible per se, but to have the bacteria digest the liver and produce oil."

I only know how to age raw liver to make "high-meat". I am really none too familiar with how to ferment raw liver from the point of view of a cooked-foodist, though, what to pickle it in etc.

Any help appreciated. Thanks!
“Tolerance only for those who agree with you is no tolerance at all.”
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Offline Lascjp

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #815 on: January 06, 2012, 06:52:09 AM »
A little sea salt and a little whey and then seal it? Breath daily? Wait until the oil has separated from the tissue? Will take some experimenting!

or..

http://www.eatcleanlifthard.com/forum/showthread.php?54146-raw-fermented-liver-amp-salmon...do-I-dare
Been RVAF since Nov '07. Taught myself with the internet, and by experimenting. All healed up now, except I'm sure there's still some gunk in here to detox but for the most part, all healthy!
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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #816 on: January 06, 2012, 01:50:48 PM »
I hang my liver in the fridge, and it turns a little sour.   I think the bacteria is feeding on the carbs in the liver.  Thus, it naturally ferments. 

Offline Löwenherz

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #817 on: January 07, 2012, 08:36:04 PM »
I am in the middle of a 7-day water-fast. I have previously been eating too many carbs and cooked foods given the Christmas period

What happens if you eat "too many carbs"?

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #818 on: January 07, 2012, 09:04:14 PM »
What happens if you eat "too many carbs"?

Löwenherz

My appetite increases and I eat too much food.
“Tolerance only for those who agree with you is no tolerance at all.”
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Offline Löwenherz

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #819 on: January 07, 2012, 09:17:10 PM »
My appetite increases and I eat too much food.

It's really funny how different our bodies react.

On a raw diet I never ever feel hungry, no matter what I eat or how much I eat. Somehow, for me food feels as if it was just entertainment and nothing more. And my weight is rock stable, no matter what kind of raw foods I eat.

Cooked food makes everything very complicated, EVERYTHING.

What was the meaning of Pandora's box? Cooked food!

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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #820 on: March 09, 2012, 10:03:15 AM »
Tyler, Are you interested in sake at all? I know you have reported in the past that you drink "real ale," which is apparently raw. I stumbled upon the fact that there is raw sake on the Internet not long ago and discovered that my local liquor store carries one brand, which also happens to be organic. Thought you might be interested. I notice that it tastes WAY better to me than the pasteurized sakes I've tried. It still chaps my lips pretty badly, like some other processed carby foods, but I doubt it would do that to you, as you seem to handle carby foods much better than me.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #821 on: March 09, 2012, 11:04:20 AM »

Cooked food makes everything very complicated, EVERYTHING.


If I had to sum up my thoughts on cooked food in one simple sentence, this would be it. Of course, cooked food addicts never listen, but it's still the truth, no matter whether they listen or not.

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #822 on: March 09, 2012, 01:36:55 PM »
Tyler, Are you interested in sake at all? I know you have reported in the past that you drink "real ale," which is apparently raw. I stumbled upon the fact that there is raw sake on the Internet not long ago and discovered that my local liquor store carries one brand, which also happens to be organic. Thought you might be interested. I notice that it tastes WAY better to me than the pasteurized sakes I've tried. It still chaps my lips pretty badly, like some other processed carby foods, but I doubt it would do that to you, as you seem to handle carby foods much better than me.
Oh, interesting. Might try that at some stage. 
“Tolerance only for those who agree with you is no tolerance at all.”
 Ray Davis

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #823 on: March 10, 2012, 09:26:19 AM »
Cool. I don't know what is available in the UK, but in the USA, I came across "Sho Chiku Bai Nama Sake (namazake), organic"
Type: Junmai Nama ("nama" apparently typically indicates that the sake was not pasteurized--aka "raw" sake--and was bottled immediately after production--aka "draft" sake--and "Junmai" apparently refers to the rice being less polished, and therefore sweeter, than other grades like Ginjo. However, the Website also calls it "Ginjo grade," so I suspect that it is actually in-between (Junmai-Ginjo).
http://www.takarasake.com/sake.php

"Nama is a draft-style sake that is not heat pasteurized but rather micro-filtered. A bold and refreshing flavor with a fruity aroma is a distinctive character of Nama."

Organic version: "It's totally natural, made from OCIA certified organic rice harvested in the Sacramento Valley. This Ginjo grade sake is an elegant Nama with a soft texture."

Pronunciation of the Japanese way of saying the sake type, namazake: http://www.forvo.com/word/namazake/

In contrast to nama sakes, most sakes are reportedly heated twice before sale, and sometimes heated yet a third time when served by restaurants.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #824 on: March 10, 2012, 01:10:59 PM »
That looks tasty, Phil.  I might have to try that sometime, when I'm out having sushi.