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TylerDurden:

--- Quote from: Raw Kyle on February 22, 2012, 09:12:52 am --- If I ended up with a parasite I'd be eating a lot of crow over it after all the years of assuring people it's safe to eat raw meat.

--- End quote ---
I suppose this remark was aimed at me. The only thing is that my one and only  tapeworm experience only involved a minor issue in the beginning, but turned out to be harmless in the end. This coincides with other scientific data showing that tapeworms are generally harmless. So, I feel justified in reassuring people that parasites are harmless and can be gotten rid of with ease with the help of certain drugs, anyway.

aLptHW4k4y:

--- Quote from: TylerDurden on October 05, 2011, 02:08:59 pm ---For example, I am pretty sure, given my own experience, that the body needs to produce much less stomach acid when eating mostly raw foods.
--- End quote ---

I'm not so sure. Stomach acid is necessary to denature protein. Cooking already denatures protein, so that effectively less stomach acid is needed?

I mean the stomach essentially is like an oven, except it breaks food down chemically, not by heat. I'm not a chemist, but logically at least equally or likely more acid would be needed for raw food.

edit: found a nice article which may help (it helped me) understand: http://ecologos.org/denature.htm

The conclusion is that high heat results in structures that are harder to break down, so in this case more acid and longer stay in the stomach may be necessary. Heating to 60-70C though, just enough to denature most protein, would lead to needing less acid and easier digestion, in my opinion.

TylerDurden:
The problem is that denaturing via cooking is not the same kind of denaturing caused by stomach-acid or even the denaturing caused by marinating in lemon juice. It's also been pointed out that cooking alters the structure of the proteins etc. in foods, making them more difficult to be dealt with by the body's enzymes.

Raw Kyle:
I'm fairly certain that some vitamins can be damaged by prolonged high heat that wouldn't be from stomach acid but protein denaturing I don't quite see the difference. Ultimately they're all broken down to amino acids, anything larger than tripeptide cannot cross the intestinal border and even they are broken down into individual amino acids in the enterocytes. Seems to me like the only way to mess it up would be to burn it enough to break down individual amino acids, I don't think most cooking methods can do that kind of chemistry.

cherimoya_kid:

--- Quote from: Raw Kyle on February 24, 2012, 12:21:13 pm ---I'm fairly certain that some vitamins can be damaged by prolonged high heat that wouldn't be from stomach acid but protein denaturing I don't quite see the difference. Ultimately they're all broken down to amino acids, anything larger than tripeptide cannot cross the intestinal border and even they are broken down into individual amino acids in the enterocytes. Seems to me like the only way to mess it up would be to burn it enough to break down individual amino acids, I don't think most cooking methods can do that kind of chemistry.

--- End quote ---

Thorough chewing is pretty effective too.  Eating softer body parts and chewing thoroughly is pretty helpful, I think.  Letting meat become a little bit high also works well, and gives you the added benefit of useful bacteria.

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