Author Topic: Fixing narrow palates and cranial deformities  (Read 40602 times)

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Offline wodgina

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Re: Fixing narrow palates and cranial deformities
« Reply #50 on: October 08, 2011, 01:20:57 pm »
Waldpfad, does your jaw still hang?
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Fixing narrow palates and cranial deformities
« Reply #51 on: October 09, 2011, 01:46:57 am »
So enough with the suspense, what's the name of the orthodontist and do you have a link to the TIME Magazine article?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Waldpfad

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Re: Fixing narrow palates and cranial deformities
« Reply #52 on: October 09, 2011, 05:26:43 am »
Okay, after spending 30 minutes in Google trying to find the cover of TIME magazine images for 2010, nothing but other crap has showed up.
I can't remember which month it was. I think I showed up for my first adjustment after getting braces which was November 2010 and he had the Magazine framed standing at the entrance desk...showing it off.
On my next appointment I will certainly ask which month that was puplished and let you know.

His name is Dr. Troy Alan Williams and he is located in Twin Falls, Idaho. He also has a physicians of the year award from 2004. The praxis is called Braces R Us.

My jaw does not 'hang' there anymore, although atm non of my teeth fit since I just had my wire bent again last Wednesday and all my teeth are on the move. My top canines sit like 1/2 mm too far down, which looks good, but is not functional for me because the lower canines are also long and kinda hit the tops. So he is moving the upper out...and in 6 weeks we will see how it all fits. If they're still in the way then he will move them back up a bit so I don't clash my canines together. The lower jaw seems to be a bit more flexible than the upper and it expanded faster, I sometimes have to have a power chain on my lower jaw to keep things from moving too fast. I hate the power chain ...
At night, my jaw is relaxed and I don't feel like I have to hold my jaw in place to keep it from popping, clenching and whatnot. I used to sleep with an extra pillow under my lower jaw to keep it from hanging. I sleep on my side and belly. If my lower jaw didn't have the  support, I would wake up with severe headaches and tension in my face and jaw and at times it felt like my lower jaw was dislocated (which it wasn't).
Not knowing where to put the lower jaw my entire life has really given me a ton of stress, unconcious stress. I knew something was wrong but I didn't know what it was until I read WAPF's article 'Is it Mental or Dental?'. I bought his book 'Nutrition and Physical Degeneration' and immediately called my mother to dog her out!
I've been on a Primal 'diet' since April 2010 and braces were put on end of September the same year. He borrowed my book (not sure if he read it all) and was fascinated about my printed -'Is it Dental or Mental'- article. He asked to keep it to show to future adult patients.
I am so glad I found Dr. Williams. The consultations I had with all the other Orthos all suggested surgery + additional braces afterwards, but also, non of those had self-ligating brackets in their office. They all used conventional braces. I was referred to Dr. Williams by an Orthodontist who wasn't afraid to admit that this is something he cannot do, his name was Dr. Geist and does surgery to widen the dental arch/palate, and then slaps on train tracks to just straighten teeth...which in reality doesn't correct the bite imo.


 

Offline Waldpfad

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Re: Fixing narrow palates and cranial deformities
« Reply #53 on: October 09, 2011, 05:37:42 am »
Also, I think people should just put up with their slight deformities in the face, but correct the bite accordingly.
The disfigurement is kinda set in stone once you stop growing and to correct the entire head bones, surgery is certainly needed.
The right side of my face will always be slightly flatter and my eyeball not as high, but non of this will give me any pain anymore because the bite surface, the foundation of the face, is corrected.
Oh if parents only knew what they do to their kids when they don't go to an Orthodontist at age 10 or so... Most want kids just for themselves, for whatever selfish reason and don't plan ahead moneywise to REALLY take care of a child. Instead of having 1 kid and taking care of it 100%, they have 4 or more and give each of them 25% care or less...which is usually toys or fancy clothing.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Fixing narrow palates and cranial deformities
« Reply #54 on: October 09, 2011, 05:59:22 am »
Thanks much for sharing this success story. Do you have a link to the "Is it Mental or Dental?" article?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Waldpfad

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Re: Fixing narrow palates and cranial deformities
« Reply #55 on: October 09, 2011, 07:12:13 am »
Here is a link to the article.

http://www.westonaprice.org/dentistry/mental-or-dental

Note though that Weston Price focuses on races that have naturally a broad face, not a wide face into the other direction, from nose to ear.
People with broad faces are shorter from nose to ear and usually have a lot more head left behind the ear. While other races might have a seemingly narrow face, but prominent cheekbones and oval shaped heads with a long distance between nose and ears (middle east, Balkan region, some tribes in Africa, european dinarid).
Regardless of the shape of the actual palate, the dental arch should be wide enough to properly place the tongue into the upper palate and all of the teeth should touch comfortably when resting (height of teeth within the bone). No need to go any further than that, perfectly straight teeth or not. The back molars should be vertically under your iris...not near the inside of the eyeball or worse. The tongue also should be snug inside the palate, not rolled up, not totally lose, and not forced into the lower palate because it feels too big (which it isn't, the arch is too narrow). The tongue should make contact with teeth, otherwise it wouldn't be natures own expansion device. The ripples on the upper palate are normal, all mammals have them, even fish.
Also most people are confused about palate vs. dental arch. The palate is the horizontal part of the bone, the dental arch is the verticle bone the teeth sit in. Technically, the lower jaw has no 'palate'.