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Off Topic / Photos of Inuit tribes in early 1900s
« Last post by TylerDurden on Yesterday at 09:32:40 pm »
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4252264/Geraldine-Moodie-s-Candadian-photograph-collection.html

Seems no photos of raw-meat-consumption  nor of any indication of what the Inuit diet was actually like c. 1900, but interesting nevertheless. My only encounter with primitive tribes was one surreal meeting with a Maasai warrior in the African bush, decades ago, who proceeded to talk to me in fluent Swahili for 10 minutes, completely oblivious to the fact that I understood not one word he said. I was, at the time, deeply impressed by his shining, healthy skin and magnificent musculature, a big contrast to  the rather sickly bodies of Europeans and more settled Negroes in East Africa.I am sure the raw milk/raw blood helped a lot in this regard, but the sheer amount of daily exercise on the plains was also a factor.
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General Discussion / Re: Garden Tips
« Last post by dariorpl on Yesterday at 08:22:07 pm »
All great tips eve

I've been thinking of doing this also in the future, once I get some suitable land.

I've been thinking that it would be a good idea to compile a list of all the foods you could grow given a particular climate, soil, space and available amount of water, for each season of the year, so that you always have fresh foods and herbs from the garden, and follow the natural cycle of the seasons to decide which to consume at which times and in which quantities.

Another thing you may consider is visiting organic farmers' markets and trying out their products, then when you find something you like that might be suitable for your garden, ask to purchase seeds from them. Or oftentimes you can get the seeds from the product itself, if it's a fruit for example.

Although many fruits are not grown directly from seed, but that's something else to ponder about, and maybe we shouldn't be consuming those types of fruits in vast amounts, since they would be very rare if not nonexistant in the wild and are so different from their wild counterparts?
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General Discussion / Re: Garden Tips
« Last post by eveheart on Yesterday at 11:34:27 am »
The good news with heirloom crops is that you can save the seeds from the great ones, so it's worth it to try seeds that "sound" interesting. Keep a garden diary! Each page of my diary is a diagram of each bed or row and what I plant and harvest each month. An underappreciated benefit is the beauty of leafy plants that are flowering and going to seed.

So much depends on your soil and climate that there is no way to really know what will be best until you try it. I'd start with seed-sharing with my neighbors and buy a few seeds that look interesting. Don't forget to investigate favorites from other cultures - lots of folks from the "old country" bring seeds for their favorites.

Online, I've bought from https://www.reneesgarden.com/ for decades, partly because their seeds are good, and partly because they are a bunch of women. I used to swap on http://www.gardenweb.com/, but I don't think it's worth the effort to offer, search, pack,  and mail.

My main focus has always been to extend the season. In southern California, I was able to garden year round. For the winter crops, I'd buy seeds that grew well in Alaska. In the SF area, I take 2 - 3 months off for winter.
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General Discussion / Garden Tips
« Last post by sabertooth on Yesterday at 07:23:08 am »
Im getting my garden together and plan to have the best growing season ever. My primary crops would be fresh greens, culinary and medicinal herbs, tomatoes, roots like ginger, and turmeric....and would be willing to experiment with others?

My main question is regarding how to find the best strains of the best variety of heirloom seeds....Ive looked around the web and there are just too many to chose from...and it seems to be hit or miss when it comes to the quality...some of the heirlooms Ive bought in the past were wonderful, while others didn't seem so good...

Is there a go to site that is known for being the best?
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Talking about not trusting Russian produce... I recall when I was in Kiev in 1995, a whole load of women were selling these mineral-water bottles. The bottles had all quite obviously been previously  opened and refilled with tapwater, as they had no seal. Needless to say, I didn't buy any but was surprised that they even made the attempt to sell the stuff.
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Quote
Sounds like we are all DOOMED!!!!

I do like the idea of prepping very much. But I'm not doing much about it myself except a small arsenal of guns and ammo.

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Is all Propaganda Bad?

Yes, yes, and more yes.  Anything government controlled is distorted and convoluted.  There is no need to turn to RT junk if you don't like mainstream news.  There are other much better sources.  I personally like hotair.com among other things.

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Russia has banned and also has less money for modern pesticides which are much more harmful and persistent than DDT which launched the whole environmental movement to counter it.

When I visited few years ago, industrial animal feeds was very popular, considered technologically advanced, as opposed to natural feeds.
And now, when severe economic turmoil is in full swing, almost no one cares about quality anymore.  It is all about quantity and how fast and how much can you bring it to market.  I do not trust Russian-made produce just like I do not trust Chinese-made.
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My pro-raw-meat-diet comment on the first article I (StrontiumDog)mentioned  has 13 in favour and 4 against. Who would have thought?Maybe the mainstream have some hope.....
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After thinking about it, Maybe it wasn't necessarily a fishes dream to conquer the land, the pre amphibians faced conditions quite similar to modern humans in many respects. They were often crowed into small pools of water that would grow smaller and smaller, stripped clean of all nurishment.

These poor pathetic creatures were our most early land ancestors. Fish with fins adapted to traverse the shallows and eventually over solid ground....when times were good they eeked out a decent existence....but when the water began to dry out (because of nature caused climate change) they had to face hellish ordeals just to survive.  They would wallow around in muck desperately gasping for air through mud clogged gills...barley alive, some adapted quickly and were able to hibernate under the mud, eventually they evolved the lungs needed to breath the air and from then on the world belonged to them/US

Only a select few made it out of the shallow death pits, and not all of us will make it out of the tumult of the new era. This understandably is not what people would like to hear, and so the masses are easily lead by those like the Malthusians who claim to have a plan to save us from our selves. If only we utilize reasonable measures to limit the population and cull out unwanted human traits and behaviors, then it would buy us the time we need to perfect the mastery of technology, and then everybody who wasn't exterminated would live happily ever after.

The problem with the misanthropic Malthusian thinking is that it fails to take into account the X-Factor of the spirit of life. I profess that there is a living spirit embedded into the coding of our Micro RNA. It constantly reads the environment and makes the appropriate reconfiguration of the DNA code. In  our species, the mechanics of this evolutionary marvel, has reached a much higher level of complexity than is currently understood. In attempting to comfort and pacify the misery inherent in life through artificial means, and to cull out our innate human traits that do not fit into a technocratic society, they are in essence disrupting the feed back systems between the RNA functioning and the Conscious human mind!

The protocol being suggested such as chemical birth control, genocide through war, culling through poisons and bioweapons...as well as the general out of sync with the natural world ethos of our day, will lead to increasing disharmony between Gaia and the human species, so that even those who make the Grade, may still suffer from even greater afflictions than if we would just let nature take its course.

Think of the Legend of Logan(Wolverine from the X-Men...Imagine People who live on the wild fringes and are not subjected to the sterilization, vaccinations, and environmental corruption....A quantity of humans who live unadulterated, and fully tuned into their own innate evolutionary capacity...Such People may indeed within the next few of generations, develop remarkable powers of rejuvenation and a greater capacity of the evolutionary machinery to creatively adapt. The Micro RNA of these Mutants would be able devise the solution for our problems without the need all these elaborate genocidal measures. If enough of Us can hold on and never surrender, just as those suffocated fish in the primordial pond, then by the grace of Gaia when all the vaccinated GMO masses are being culled off by the bio weapons releases, the spirit of survival will carry the X-Humans forward.
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Off Topic / Deepwater fish give indications of harm done to humans by air-pollution
« Last post by TylerDurden on February 22, 2017, 01:13:19 am »
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4245044/Deepwater-Horizon-fish-shedding-light-human-health.html

Note the reference to PAHs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also created by cooking.
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