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General Discussion / Re: DUSTBIN DILEMMA IN UK
« Last post by eveheart on Today at 03:26:29 pm »
Hmm, fair enough. Somehow, though, I doubt that worms eat plastic or metal and the like.....

Those should be recycled, anyway, and don't attract flies and rodents.
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General Discussion / Re: DUSTBIN DILEMMA IN UK
« Last post by TylerDurden on Today at 03:19:53 pm »
Hmm, fair enough. Somehow, though, I doubt that worms eat plastic or metal and the like.....
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General Discussion / Re: DUSTBIN DILEMMA IN UK
« Last post by eveheart on Today at 03:17:25 pm »
Set up compost bins! (You can learn how to prevent flies and rodents in any how-to-compost book.) Better still, set up red-wiggler worm farm compost bins. They do triple duty: composting plus worm breeding plus humus. You can use the humus in the lovely cottage gardens that surround every house in the UK, and use the worms for - um - fishing bait.
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General Discussion / Re: DUSTBIN DILEMMA IN UK
« Last post by TylerDurden on Today at 02:48:45 pm »
Well, the  once every 4 weeks bin collection phase is about to hit the whole of Britain.:-

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3706136/Now-wait-four-weeks-wheelie-bin-emptied-Angry-homeowners-attack-council-s-decision-saying-lead-rats-fly-tipping-rubbish-piling-streets.html

Incredible how spineless people are these days. 
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General Discussion / Re: More calories in cooked meat or raw meat?
« Last post by dariorpl on Yesterday at 10:02:15 pm »
Where did you come across the 16 hour comment by Wrangham?  Presumably in his book, not online?

I'm not sure. I may have been mistaken. But if I find it again, I'll let you know.

As regards the duration, Wrangham stupidly made the guess by assuming that humans chew like chimpanzees at the same speed. Yet we bolt our raw meats down mostly, after just a one chew or two, much like carnivores do, so Wrangham's notion is laughable. Besides, our jaws are more adapted to meat-eating than those of chimpanzees.

Hmm, I've seen chimps eat meat and they don't look that slow to me. And I often chew meat down to about the same consistency of ground meat, it still doesn't take me that long to do it. Though I do sometimes bolt it down like you say. It just depends on how much I feel like chewing. I'm under the impression that chewing it down makes for a better digestion as it will be liquified in the stomach, rather than having to wait until it goes through the intestines to be liquified, but I could be wrong.

Something else I've noticed, cooked meat, beef in particular, has a tendency to stick between my teeth, whereas raw beef rarely does that, and when it does it's usually some sort of gummy connective tissue/nerve and not the muscle parts. Also cooked meat seems like it doesn't dissolve normally through contact with saliva, so that when it does get stuck, it will stay there rotting away for long periods if not removed through intense brushing, using a toothpick or flossing. Raw meat however gets cleared away pretty easily on it's own or sometimes with little help. When I was a cooked meat eater I used to carry dental floss with me everywhere I went, and had to floss immediately after a meat meal, especially a beef meal. That happened even when eating blue rare thick steaks where only a tiny part on the outside was seared and the inside was raw. The outside layer browning was enough to make it get stuck. But the more cooked it was, the worse it was. Between the time spent flossing which took me like 5 minutes (or more like 25 minutes if using toothpicks, which I had to use multiple of because most of my teeth are very close together and regular tookpicks just aren't thin enough, so they'd keep breaking), and the time spent to cook meats, plus cleaning cooking instruments, plates, knives and forks, etc (all of which get intensely harder to clean when in contact with cooked versus raw meat), it took me a LOT more time to eat cooked rather than raw meats. Raw meat is easier (not harder) to chew, and it provides at least the same if not more energy in the form of calories or what have you. So the whole idea that eating raw meat took longer is ludicrous to me.
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General Discussion / Re: parasites in fish roe
« Last post by littleElefant on Yesterday at 09:21:10 pm »
I m just back from the states now. I lost 2 kg and I m happy to be back. Till now found no worms in my stool. My digestion was very bad the first traveling days but became better when I started taking kombucha and gut shots from the health food shop. To be sure I m going to make a stool test the next days, I intended to do it anyways
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Off Topic / Re: The true age of supermarket food
« Last post by TylerDurden on Yesterday at 05:58:37 pm »
kinda like inducing labor, delivering a 6-month fetus, raising it in an incubator, and then smiling and saying that the kid developed just fine outside the womb, just so the mother doesn't have to risk stretch marks.
That sort of thing is becoming more and more common:-

https://www.tommys.org/our-organisation/why-we-exist/premature-birth-statistics

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3606430/The-curse-premature-baby-born-early-earn-worse-health-later-life.html

Some are even proud of this:-   http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3694505/Mother-reveals-joy-10-healthy-babies-one-born-premature-having-one-nearly-killed-her.html

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Off Topic / Re: The true age of supermarket food
« Last post by TylerDurden on Yesterday at 05:51:45 pm »
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Off Topic / Re: The true age of supermarket food
« Last post by eveheart on Yesterday at 05:49:52 pm »
What's really scary is that agribusiness has developed cultivars of ripening fruits that will not ripen on the tree, but only ripen with exogenous applications of ethylene gas. "They" know that gas-ripened fruit doesn't contain the same biochemical components as tree-ripened fruit - agri-science studies this type of thing - yet the convenience-to-industry wins over food wholesomeness.

Ethylene gas, itself, is produced when a fruit is injured. (Picking before ripening is an injury!) When injured, the fruit "sacrifices" its quality and rushes into producing a viable seed. As CK points out, gas-ripening does not provide the fruit with nutrients required for a slow and leisurely natural ripening. Instead, the fallen fruit uses what nutrition it has within the fruit itself to reach maturity -  kinda like inducing labor, delivering a 6-month fetus, raising it in an incubator, and then smiling and saying that the kid developed just fine outside the womb, just so the mother doesn't have to risk stretch marks.
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Off Topic / Re: The true age of supermarket food
« Last post by cherimoya_kid on Yesterday at 05:19:24 pm »
Fruit continues to receive nutrition from the plant until full ripeness. Sugars travel freely back and forth between fruit and plant, and probably some minerals, and perhaps even phytonutrients, etc..
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