Author Topic: Calculations  (Read 7290 times)

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Offline kalo

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Calculations
« on: May 09, 2015, 06:10:32 am »
Twenty year old male with little body fat, 6 ft and 160
Hello, I need expert advice. I have a weaker stomach (although I say it is strong so it gets better). Raw meat has become my haven. My diet is mostly grass fed chuck, short ribs, suet, lamb, liver, and organs, hamburger meat (all frozen). I don't do enough high meat because I cannot for the life of me, find fresh local grassfed beef.  However, I saw the pics for the meat that sits in the fridge and I wanna do that. So, I work a laborious farm job, and my muscles are growing- I like that. SO  when I only have lean meat, I add suet and can tell it is not as effective. I eat a couple pounds of meat a day usually. I want to eat to achieve ketosis.
Say I only have hamburger meat and suet, and I want to consume 3000 calories. What is the right mix. Is the suet far more condensed with calories than I realize and causing me to over eat fat?

P.S. I know my body is the best judge but science and hard learned experience are good too!

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2015, 07:02:40 am »
1 part fat to 1 part lean meat, roughly.

Offline eveheart

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2015, 07:37:57 am »
I find it best to set my goals for protein and carbohydrates, never overeating either of those. I eat fat until I'm satisfied.
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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2015, 08:26:14 am »
I find it best to set my goals for protein and carbohydrates, never overeating either of those. I eat fat until I'm satisfied.

It's about rough ratios, not amounts, and definitely not precise amounts. In my opinion, anyway. Not that you don't know that, I'm pointing it out in a general sense.

Offline kalo

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2015, 09:57:38 am »
Gosh, 1 to 1 !! Eating a half pound of meat is no problem but a half pound of suet would cause me some runs. Would you put down a half pound of suet in a sitting? Cause that's BA

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2015, 02:15:48 pm »
I have never undestood why, but, since a few years ago, I get diarrhea if I eat raw liver and yellow diarrhea if I eat raw suet. So I have to eat raw tongue, raw marrow etc. for my raw fats.
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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2015, 05:58:28 pm »
Gosh, 1 to 1 !! Eating a half pound of meat is no problem but a half pound of suet would cause me some runs. Would you put down a half pound of suet in a sitting? Cause that's BA


Suet, by itself, is not a sufficient fat source. You also need marrow, brain, back fat, etc.. You can probably get away with 1.5 to 1 lean to fat, but I wouldn't go over that. It's not healthy for most people to get more than about 30-35% of total calories from protein. We've had a couple of people on this forum get pretty sick from overdoing protein. Eating it raw from very healthy animals gives you some buffer, but err on the side of caution is my best advice. Pay attention to your body and change what you're eating if you notice problems.

Offline kalo

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2015, 05:05:12 am »
Okay, so I am lucky. I live in pennsylvania and all around are farms. But the grass fed animals are pricey, and the farmers know it. They put meat, organs in small packages and sell them frozen. I have been working my ass off and I am ready to make some purchases to put my body at ease.
What can I do in terms of butchering my own animals. Would just a big fridge do the trick? Maybe there is already the whole process laid out on this forum. Either way, it would be hard for me to obtain fresh brain, marrow, fats, and ofal without just buying a grasss fed lamb or something.
Tyler D- I have the same problem but the last two days I have been eating honey with my suet and it helps.


Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2015, 09:56:25 am »
Okay, so I am lucky. I live in pennsylvania and all around are farms. But the grass fed animals are pricey, and the farmers know it. They put meat, organs in small packages and sell them frozen. I have been working my ass off and I am ready to make some purchases to put my body at ease.
What can I do in terms of butchering my own animals. Would just a big fridge do the trick? Maybe there is already the whole process laid out on this forum. Either way, it would be hard for me to obtain fresh brain, marrow, fats, and ofal without just buying a grasss fed lamb or something.



That's exactly what Sabertooth does. He lives in Kentucky, which isn't that far from you (depending on where you are). Maybe see what he suggests.

Offline jessica

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2015, 11:19:26 am »
some of the farmers around here will slaughter for you and teach you butchering, ask around and see if anyone will do that for you? 

Offline sabertooth

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2015, 11:48:13 am »
I agree that varity of fat is important, and that it is often very hard to find good sources...

I look for older mature sheep, from small family farms.... three to five year old Rams and ewes are Ideal for a high fat paleo diet.

The younger animals are too lean and their meat isn't nearly as rich and flavorful and its also way too overpriced...

The trick is to find a grass fed farm that practices good animal husbandry.... usually good breeders will cull their rams and breeding ewes after a few seasons in order to replace them with younger stock, and because most people stupidly believe that older animals are not as good as young lambs, you can often get these animals for cheap. I get my best deals from buying directly from the farm.... I pick up the animal myself which saves them the trouble of taking it to be processed so they can in turn give me a break on price.

It would be good if you could find someone who could walk you through the process, and even better if you had someone who could teach you to look for the signs of what makes for a healthy animal...I had to learn the hard way, on my own and it took me some time after buying a few bad animals before I was able to learn what to look for when shopping for an animal.

Good Luck and l would be happy to answer more of your questions if and when you get an animal ready to slaughter....
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Offline Eric

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2015, 09:56:10 pm »
Derek, what are some of the things you look for to make sure you get a healthy sheep? I have a friend who runs a lamb farm and she's offered to sell me one or a few culls. The idea is intriguing as I can get all the organs and bones, but I don't want to waste my time if the animals aren't healthy.

I definitely concur regarding animals' ages and body fat percentage. I enjoy lamb organs, but wouldn't waste my money on their meat. I've had it, and it's way to lean and too bland tasting. If I were to buy meat or fat, I'd want it to be from an adult animal.

Many indigenous peoples preferred older, mature animals too, that's why hunting traditions emerged that glorify taking large animals, particularly big bucks. The meat is very rich from a lifetime of accumulating minerals and phytochemicals, and older animals typically have higher body fat percentages, just like people.
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Offline kalo

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2015, 10:23:33 pm »
    Thanks everyone, your desire to share wisdom is touching. I went to a farm yesterday and the lady was selling lambs for 200 each. They were only half-pastured and all we often given Ivamectin, a parasite drug. (I just sounded it out) Her price was way high because she thinks the wool quality is superior. But I asked many questions.
    You see, I live in the appalachians with over 50 acres. It's my grandpas and it is almost all forest. I'd love to just buy some sheep and multiply them. However, there are predators around so a damn good fence will be necessary and they need space.

Sabertooth- Thanks for the advice, I watched your videos, you should do a RAW camp! Do the farms you frequent ever use parasite drug or dewormers? Those drugs just make the herd weaker and dependant over time.

Offline kalo

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2015, 12:50:36 am »
I'm going to a pastured farm tomorrow mornin' - man is selling me a 130 pound lamb for 3$ per pound. For 30$ he is gonna quarter it, or eighth it and cool it down (not freeze it).
Obviously, I'm gonna take the organs and the head!
But I wonder how much cooler space I need to transport it home. And all I have is a mini fridge haha!
And what could I put the blood into? A big gulp..

Offline Raw Matt18

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #14 on: May 21, 2015, 02:50:38 am »
What state are you in? I'm curious because I also have trouble finding fresh meats, I'm I'm texas
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Offline jessica

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2015, 03:15:52 am »
make sure he knows you want the blood like first thing, cause its drains fast.  bring a big glass jar,  a mini fridge isnt really going to be enough room, prepare a spot to hang your meat and get a fan. 

Offline kalo

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #16 on: May 21, 2015, 05:56:03 am »
PA.
sounds good jessica, will it fit in a cooler? like a big cooler

Offline jessica

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2015, 06:15:03 am »
maybe but you probably dont want it in there with no air circulation for long term storage.

Offline kalo

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Wooo!
« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2015, 03:13:13 am »
Wooo! Boy did I have a good day. I went and checked out a pastured farm. Arriving at the farm, the garage door was open but autoless. Instead two buggys were parked. It was my kinda place.
I asked for the man who I talked to yesterday and was pointed to a big building. An amish guy, young like me, blood on his shoes was waiting for me.
THe lamb was hanging from a rope, skin still on, under an open porch. It was like a dream. I got to skin the animal (punching fist technique) then helped to gut the fella. I learned sooo much and kept every single organ. Although he had already drained the blood.. amish don't keep that. I kept the stomach too but drained all the "green smoothie" out. I don't know how that could be eaten! Then we took the carcass inside and I hack sawed it to fit in my cooler. Getting through some of the bones was a task!
So the legs are apart and the middle is cut into, two ribs and the lion. I kept the stomach and intestines in one bag, the skull liver, heart, tongue, and brain, in another. And the next sheep he butchered, I took all the internal fat again!
I have to store this better. I'm gonna get hooks for all the muscle meats, and some of the organs but what can I do with all the extra fat, its very runny. And what about all the guts, I feel like they will spoil quickly.
Shucks, I'm pumped

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2015, 04:31:38 am »
The fat being runny means it's high in omega 3. It's that time of year. In my experience it hardens up quite a bit if you slaughter in the fall. It should harden up some once you get it cold though.

Offline kalo

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #20 on: May 22, 2015, 06:06:01 am »
Oh great! thanks man.. so for the first animal, it got mixed with a good deal of blood. Do you melt it down, I don't want it to spoil being all wet and in a big plastic bag..
How is the season going for you? Also the liver looks very fresh and shiny but there are some small holes running through it. Are those bad or just blood vessels?

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #21 on: May 22, 2015, 09:10:28 am »
I would just wash it with cold water to get the meat juice off of it. I would rather freeze it than cook it. It should last a good while in the fridge especially if you have it as cold as possible.

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #22 on: May 22, 2015, 09:15:47 am »
Derek, what are some of the things you look for to make sure you get a healthy sheep? I have a friend who runs a lamb farm and she's offered to sell me one or a few culls. The idea is intriguing as I can get all the organs and bones, but I don't want to waste my time if the animals aren't healthy.

I definitely concur regarding animals' ages and body fat percentage. I enjoy lamb organs, but wouldn't waste my money on their meat. I've had it, and it's way to lean and too bland tasting. If I were to buy meat or fat, I'd want it to be from an adult animal.

Many indigenous peoples preferred older, mature animals too, that's why hunting traditions emerged that glorify taking large animals, particularly big bucks. The meat is very rich from a lifetime of accumulating minerals and phytochemicals, and older animals typically have higher body fat percentages, just like people.

 Cull Generally means that the animal for some reason didn't come back into heat and get bred on time. However they generally had "time off" to fatten up on grass without having to work hard producing milk and growing babies. The best beef I ever had were a 4 or so year old bull who snapped his leg in the barn but I think even better were 20 something old cows from my friend's farm who failed to breed back. He claims to have cows that are as old as 31. They are delicious.

Offline kalo

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Re: Calculations
« Reply #23 on: May 24, 2015, 06:29:30 am »
Yea I just put all the organs in a casserole dish together, and I'm getting through them. But I'd rather eat fresh liver than frozen. I froze the stomach and intestines and I don't think I have the courage to do anything but compost them! Thanks for the tip on older cows as I can get those cheaper, although I do not have much space for it. What about older sheep. My 13 month old lamb already taste pretty strong to me.