Author Topic: K2 in High Meat  (Read 3635 times)

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Offline DavidFoster

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K2 in High Meat
« on: March 26, 2015, 04:18:42 am »
Hey, my name's David and I'm new to the forum.  I just recently started incorporating raw meats into my diet, and I'm moving toward a diet strictly composed of raw beef, raw beef organs, and egg yolks.  I am also making my first batch of high meat, as I need a good source of probiotics.

Is there Vitamin K2 in high meat?  I've heard that the anaerobic bacteria in sauerkraut produce K2, and imagine it's the same with the aerobic bacteria in high meat.  I also assume it's the MK-7 variety.

Offline Alive

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Re: K2 in High Meat
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2015, 07:53:18 am »
I'm trialing a batch of high meat and fish that has been inoculated with Bacillus subtilis from frozen Japanese natto, by washing some defrosted fermented soy beans with a little warm water and then mixing this with the raw meat, and airing the jars weekly (its cool here now so they won't be so active to need much air).

I can taste that they have colonised the meat and therefore it is bound to contain high levels of vitamin K2 menaquinone-7.
The resulting high meat has a good taste and smell.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10874601 Intake of fermented soybean (natto) increases circulating vitamin K2 (menaquinone-7) and gamma-carboxylated osteocalcin concentration in normal individuals.

Offline jessica

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Re: K2 in High Meat
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2015, 08:38:04 am »
did you rinse the beans? weird, i woulda thought that would wash off most of the bacteria.  good experiement though, i hate that it starts with soy.  i wonder where they got the bacilus subtillis from in the first place?

Offline DavidFoster

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Re: K2 in High Meat
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2015, 04:15:40 am »
This is very interesting!  With this method, one could conceivably introduce a small amount of soy to initially introduce the bacteria, and then merely reuse the sample in multiple batches, which would limit any phytoestrogenic activity from the soy by reducing the concentration over time, while maximizing K2 production.

Offline Alive

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Re: K2 in High Meat
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2015, 06:15:22 am »
did you rinse the beans? weird, i woulda thought that would wash off most of the bacteria.  good experiement though, i hate that it starts with soy.  i wonder where they got the bacilus subtillis from in the first place?

I rinsed the fermented beans with a small amount of water and then added this water to the meat, so that the microbes are transferred in the water to the meat.

I had a piece of the high meat this morning and it tasted good.

Offline jessica

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Re: K2 in High Meat
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2015, 10:16:10 am »
 okay thanks for the clarification.  why was the natto frozen? is that your only option?  Bacillus subtilis, the bacteria that creates natto is already present in aged meats....heres a fun experiment http://www.avocadosource.com/journals/saaga/saaga_1996/saaga_1996_pg_54-58.pdf

Offline Alive

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Re: K2 in High Meat
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2015, 10:49:38 am »
It comes frozen from Japan to the Asian supermarket. The natto inoculated high meat tastes different than regular high meat, so there can't be much Bacillus subtilis floating around in the air to naturally inoculate it.

Offline political atheist

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Re: K2 in High Meat
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2015, 07:24:52 pm »
the only way i would eat ANYTHING soy related is for 1 million dollars, 1 serving max.