Author Topic: Active rest  (Read 20956 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PrimiFit

  • Scavenger
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: fi
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • PrimiFit: Personal Trainer Helsinki
Re: Active rest
« Reply #25 on: February 01, 2012, 01:56:49 pm »
Lifting does tend to adapt the muscles to be shorter, so that might be the difference, I'm guessing. That could be corrected by doing enough stretching or some sports that require an active and flexible body. Doing jumping, climbing and all that is great. I say, do it all. I like to lift barbells, dumbells, kettlebells, rocks, sandbags, do chins, ring work, climbing, jumping and running. Focusing on just one aspect isn't enough. Although, I don't do all of those in one program, but put some of the stuff in and after a few weeks try something different.

I'm glad that you liked it, Inger! I wouldn't do the jumps every time, because they are more of a work out. You can hurt your legs in the long run doing too much of those.

No, I didn't by the colostrum, haha. Honestly, I'm taking a break from dairy, because I have seemed to develop a sensitivity to it.
Primal Health and Strength

Offline HIT_it_RAW

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #26 on: February 01, 2012, 08:02:18 pm »
Lifting does tend to adapt the muscles to be shorter...
Bullshit! The lenght of a muscle is determand entirely by genetics. Its flexibility might be effected by exercise. In fact it should be effected in a very positive manner by weight training. Lifting weights correctly(full range with strech/prestrech) will increase flexibility enormous.
“A man should be able to build a house, butcher a hog, tan the hide,
preserve the meat, deliver a baby, nurture the sick and reassure the dying, fight a war … specialization is for insects.”

Offline achillezzz

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 658
  • Country: 00
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2012, 01:01:41 am »
Hit it raw.. Tell me something is there any relationship between the muscle bellies length of a person to his recovery abilities? I noticed all top level athletes be it the NBA the NFL.. Swimmers.. The top guys are all unique in their muscle bellies length!! They all have very long biceps very long calfs and long lower backs to a degree that their torsos are straight like a board.. On the other hand we got those people with very short biceps very short calfs round lower back torso strucutres and we barely see them at the top levels they just dont make it to that level.

Offline aLptHW4k4y

  • Shaman
  • *****
  • Posts: 447
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2012, 01:53:42 am »
I'd say in those sports it's a lot more about hard work and technique rather than the particular shape of the muscles.
In weightlifting, maybe, but that would pretty hard to measure.

Offline achillezzz

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 658
  • Country: 00
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #29 on: February 02, 2012, 02:11:53 am »
I noticed that those who have long shaped muscles have better recovery abilities.. how true is that?

Offline aLptHW4k4y

  • Shaman
  • *****
  • Posts: 447
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2012, 02:28:54 am »
Probably not very true, I can't see how muscle shape alone would affect recovery. Maybe it would indicate better genes, as in better adapted for physical work?
Muscle fiber type, diet, sleep, genetics, how detrained you are, etc. these things matter.

Offline achillezzz

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 658
  • Country: 00
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2012, 02:35:38 am »
I also noticed that people with longer muscles shapes have more tendency towards slow twitch fiber types... which means red muscles fiber.. which means more blood supply which means better recovery ability...

However I'm not sure if long term adaption to hard labor when growing up can result in better recovery abilities in later years ...
Like training everyday very hard from very very young age.

Offline RawZi

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,052
  • Country: us
  • Gender: Female
  • Need I say more?
    • View Profile
    • my twitter
Re: Active rest
« Reply #32 on: February 02, 2012, 10:57:49 am »
.. people with longer muscles shapes have more tendency towards slow twitch fiber types... which means red muscles fiber.. which means more blood supply which means better recovery ability...

    What helped you learn this? I'd like to know more.
"Genuine truth angers people in general because they don't know what to do with the energy generated by a glimpse of reality." Greg W. Goodwin

Offline HIT_it_RAW

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #33 on: February 02, 2012, 11:12:32 pm »
Hit it raw.. Tell me something is there any relationship between the muscle bellies length of a person to his recovery abilities? I noticed all top level athletes be it the NBA the NFL.. Swimmers.. The top guys are all unique in their muscle bellies length!! They all have very long biceps very long calfs and long lower backs to a degree that their torsos are straight like a board.. On the other hand we got those people with very short biceps very short calfs round lower back torso strucutres and we barely see them at the top levels they just dont make it to that level.
Your reasoning is wrong. The people you see in prof sports are top athletes therefore they have superior recovery and long muscle bellies or they wouldn't be top athletes. That doesn't mean that the two are linked. Just that if you happen to have both you're much more likely to be a top athlete.(and thus seen by you)
Quote
I also noticed that people with longer muscles shapes have more tendency towards slow twitch fiber types...
You noticed that how? by looking at endurance athletes? They almost always have long limbs and small muscles thus seem to have long muscles.
Quote
which means red muscles fiber.. which means more blood supply which means better recovery ability.
Thats a rather strange conclusion.

Recovery has much more to do with the ability of the metabolic system to remove damage tissue and build new tissue. Organs like the liver an kidneys pay a huge role in this. Off course good nutrition makes a big difference.


We should never forget that when we look at athletes on tv that those (wo)man are pure genetic freaks. They have the perfect bodily proportion for their particular sport. A weightlifter has short limbs long muscles bellies combined with a lot of fast twitch fibre. An endurance athlete has long limbs and a lot of slow twitch fiber. They must have these specific features or they wouldn't be able to compete against the rest of them genetic freaks called world class athletes. We of course cannot say anything in general about those factors by looking at the 0,0001% genetic freaks of the population.

Also all top athletes have superior neurological ability. they can activate many more fibres at once than regular folks can. Even an endurance top atlete with small muscles and long limbs, and thus has very bad weightlifting proportions, is a rather strong lifter compared to av joe because of this.
« Last Edit: February 06, 2012, 05:20:44 pm by TylerDurden »
“A man should be able to build a house, butcher a hog, tan the hide,
preserve the meat, deliver a baby, nurture the sick and reassure the dying, fight a war … specialization is for insects.”

Offline PrimiFit

  • Scavenger
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: fi
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • PrimiFit: Personal Trainer Helsinki
Re: Active rest
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2012, 04:10:12 pm »
Bullshit! The lenght of a muscle is determand entirely by genetics. Its flexibility might be effected by exercise. In fact it should be effected in a very positive manner by weight training. Lifting weights correctly(full range with strech/prestrech) will increase flexibility enormous.

That's a weird way to start a converastion with a person you don't know, man.

Sure, the genetics determine a lot of thing but rarely it's purely so. There's also epigenetic factors. Our bodies adapt. People who sit all day, have shortened and elongated muscles in different parts of their bodies. Sure, training will also help to maintain some flexibility, but that's only if you train in a way that let's you stretch each muscle to its full length.
Primal Health and Strength

Offline HIT_it_RAW

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2012, 04:47:36 pm »
That's a weird way to start a converastion with a person you don't know, man.
True. Apologies for that. I'm somewhat passionate about those things.
Quote
Sure, the genetics determine a lot of thing but rarely it's purely so. There's also epigenetic factors. Our bodies adapt. People who sit all day, have shortened and elongated muscles in different parts of their bodies.
Genetics stay the same from birth to death. So thing based on genetics (like the lenght of a muscle) do not change from external influences. Epigenetic changes are seen in thing like behaviour not physical changes.
Quote
Sure, training will also help to maintain some flexibility, but that's only if you train in a way that let's you stretch each muscle to its full length.
That is the only way to train with weights. If a movement is not full range(from fully stretched to fully contracted) it is of only very limited value.
“A man should be able to build a house, butcher a hog, tan the hide,
preserve the meat, deliver a baby, nurture the sick and reassure the dying, fight a war … specialization is for insects.”

Offline PrimiFit

  • Scavenger
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: fi
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • PrimiFit: Personal Trainer Helsinki
Re: Active rest
« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2012, 04:55:03 pm »
I think that deadlifts are a good way to strengthen your back and the body as a whole, but does it have a full range of motion for your back? No. So, someone who doesn't do also some back exercises that has full range of motion can become stiff in the back, especially if one trains also squats and good mornings etc. which all require a neutral lower back.
Primal Health and Strength

Offline HIT_it_RAW

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 684
  • Country: nl
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #37 on: February 06, 2012, 05:51:01 pm »
Actually deadlifts do not significantly strenghten the lower back. It strenghtens the muscles of the hip and thighs. Research done using the medx lumbar extension machine (which measures isolated lowerback(erector spinea) strenght) has shown that deadlifts do not increase strength in that area.

Most people confuse flexibility in the lower back with hamstring flexibility. Flexibility in the lower back plane of movement is restricted by the desing of the spinal colum. The movement is restricted by the joints of the lumbar spinal discs. How far someone can bend over (reaching for toes) is determant bij the flexibility of the hamstring muscles. Stiff legged deadlifts exercise the hamstring muscles over a near ful range of movement. At the low point of a stif legged deadlift the movement is restricted by the hamstrings stretching. That is why the deadlift increases bent over flexibility. This should however not be confused with lower back flexibility.
“A man should be able to build a house, butcher a hog, tan the hide,
preserve the meat, deliver a baby, nurture the sick and reassure the dying, fight a war … specialization is for insects.”

Offline PrimiFit

  • Scavenger
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: fi
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • PrimiFit: Personal Trainer Helsinki
Re: Active rest
« Reply #38 on: February 06, 2012, 08:55:37 pm »
Ofcourse if you measure the strength of the lower back in another movement, it won't transfer very well because in deadlifts you have to keep it in one position. That kind of strength transfers to only about 30 degrees of range in motion. Holding a big weight while putting effort to keep a straight back will give you tremendous back strength in that position.
Primal Health and Strength

Offline LePatron7

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,675
  • Country: fr
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #39 on: February 12, 2012, 03:45:18 am »
Its a good way to recover from mental illness too.
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.

Nocebo Effect - a detrimental effect on health produced by psychological or psychosomatic factors such as negative expectations of treatment or prognosis

Med free since 03/21/2014

Offline PrimiFit

  • Scavenger
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: fi
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • PrimiFit: Personal Trainer Helsinki
Re: Active rest
« Reply #40 on: February 12, 2012, 11:55:00 pm »

Its a good way to recover from mental illness too.

I'm curious. Do you know anyone who has used it as a tool for that?
Primal Health and Strength

Offline Inger

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 899
  • Country: de
  • Gender: Female
  • 38 yo Norwegian RVAF s.-06, 90% carniv.
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #41 on: February 14, 2012, 05:55:29 pm »
Adora,
I guess I do will mix it up a little. Sometimes a little yoga, sometimes weights..
I need variety too. And I love to be out in the woods! I like natural exersice the best actually (parkour is fun!).
I do like to lift too. But I will step back a little. I am not doing it now too much as I cannot recht the fitnessclub without hubby, he has the car. He had a lot of things going on last weeks so we was not training that much.
I also need to feel free, to exercise or not exercise. I feel bad when it becomes a must-do. ;) It have to be fun. :)
I need to have days when I do nothing too... lazy girl. ;D
Thank you for your suggestions. :)

Inger

Offline Inger

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 899
  • Country: de
  • Gender: Female
  • 38 yo Norwegian RVAF s.-06, 90% carniv.
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #42 on: February 14, 2012, 05:58:39 pm »
PrimiFit,
I wanted to ask - how do you feel from all the raw milk, what symptoms do you notice that made you think you have developed an allergy to it?
I myself start to get enough from the colostrum.. strange but true.
I guess it should be used only temporarily.

Inger
« Last Edit: February 14, 2012, 07:10:19 pm by TylerDurden »

Offline PrimiFit

  • Scavenger
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: fi
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • PrimiFit: Personal Trainer Helsinki
Re: Active rest
« Reply #43 on: February 23, 2012, 03:14:28 pm »
Hi Inger.

Sorry to answer with such a long delay. I've been a bit busy :).

To be honest, I started to get gas after drinking fresh raw milk. Being a lactose intolerant person, I can tell when the reason is milk, not to go into too much detail.

Do you mean that you get problems from colostrum?

I've understood that one should take breaks from each particular source of protein in order to avoid food sensitivities. So, maby one week drink milk and then take a break for a week or two. Or drink milk one day, eat beef next day, lamb the second day, chicken on the third etc.
Primal Health and Strength

Offline PrimiFit

  • Scavenger
  • *
  • Posts: 24
  • Country: fi
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • PrimiFit: Personal Trainer Helsinki
Re: Active rest
« Reply #44 on: February 23, 2012, 03:17:33 pm »
Here's another video and it's all about forearms, fingers and wrists. Weather you lift barbells, kettlebells, rocks, play the piano or click away with your mouse all day, you can find this helpful.

PrimiFit: Kyynärvarsien liikkuvuusharjoitus / Forearm mobility, Personal Trainer Helsinki
Primal Health and Strength

Offline Cavecloth.com

  • Forager
  • *
  • Posts: 12
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #45 on: February 17, 2013, 02:14:59 am »
These are great videos. Thanks for posting

Offline freezerburn

  • Egg Thief
  • **
  • Posts: 30
  • Country: ca
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #46 on: February 21, 2013, 06:17:40 am »
Genetics stay the same from birth to death. So thing based on genetics (like the lenght of a muscle) do not change from external influences. Epigenetic changes are seen in thing like behaviour not physical changes.That is the only way to train with weights. If a movement is not full range(from fully stretched to fully contracted) it is of only very limited value.

People tend to underestimate epigenetic change.  Constant stretching will add sarcomeres to the length of muscle fibres (at the musculotendinous junction).  True: Albert Beckels could not develop biceps shaped like those of Sergio Oliva -even if he wanted to, but the fact that you bodybuild and see results falls under what scientists call epigenetic variation.  You could also train in a manner that would make you look like a runner.  I have taken myself through various changes.  I have very significantly raised my VO2 max capacity to elite athlete standards (something some people say trained athletes can not really do) and I have also been a strong mutant overgrown beast incapable of running more than a couple of blocks.  We have the ability to turn on genes.  The correct stress will do....within genetic limitations ;)

Offline Barefoot Instincto

  • Buffalo Hunter
  • ***
  • Posts: 122
  • Country: 00
    • View Profile
Re: Active rest
« Reply #47 on: February 21, 2013, 10:29:20 am »
Here's another video and it's all about forearms, fingers and wrists. Weather you lift barbells, kettlebells, rocks, play the piano or click away with your mouse all day, you can find this helpful.

PrimiFit: Kyynärvarsien liikkuvuusharjoitus / Forearm mobility, Personal Trainer Helsinki

Great stuff, I'll be following this daily. My right arm currently has big issues and limitations, that has given me a lot of trouble in the past. Its been very strong lately and bulking up though. The head of my radius bone is basically gone, which causes the whole bone to be shortened including at the wrist, giving me mucho wrist problems.

Just doing this once already felt really great.