Author Topic: Agriculture ruined human bones  (Read 485 times)

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Offline TylerDurden

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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Agriculture ruined human bones
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2014, 12:16:22 pm »
Sensationalistic, but the research appears to be solid.

Interesting that bone strength was even greater 150K years ago. Probably cooking has something to do with that.

Offline sabertooth

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Re: Agriculture ruined human bones
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2014, 12:56:56 pm »
"And after ruling out diet differences and changes in body size as possible causes, researchers concluded reductions in physical activity are the root cause of degradation in human bone strength across millennia. " from article.

Ha, I would like to know how they were able to rule out diet differences....
Diet and lifestyle both must play an equally huge part in how the skeletal structure is formed and maintained.

There is another hypothesis which the article does not cover as well... which is the idea that how our bones age depends greatly on a combination of how well they are nourished and how much they are used. A well nourished paleo man may have been better able to maintain higher bone density and the appearance of more youthful features than the average sedentary processed food eater of today.

There are skeptics who say the analysis methods used to determine the age of modern skeletons do not directly correlate to the accurate ageing of Paleolithic bones? A paleo man in his 50s very well could have the youthful bone structure of a modern man in his 30s.

 
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Offline eveheart

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Re: Agriculture ruined human bones
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2014, 01:17:33 pm »
"And after ruling out diet differences and changes in body size as possible causes, researchers concluded reductions in physical activity are the root cause of degradation in human bone strength across millennia. " from article.

When I read that statement in the article, I wondered how early agriculture could be associated with less physical activity. Before the tractor, it wasn't a sit-down job. Even plowing with a draft animal is pretty physical from sun-up to sun-down. I know they say that there is a correlation between physical activity and bone density, but agriculture brought not just farming activity, but vigorous food preparation activity to make grains into something light and fluffy that tastes good with syrup.
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Offline sabertooth

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Re: Agriculture ruined human bones
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2014, 12:18:20 am »
Thats it!

Though conditions varied greatly.... One has to suspect that many Paleo people with large robust frames did not work from dawn to dusk as many agrarians had to. Fisherman tribes of the physically powerful Cro-magnon, could exert great energy and strength in small burst, such as pulling in a hall of fish, then spend the rest of the day doing light work, such as tending and mending the basic tools and amenities. Since they had the raw materials to build powerful bodies, and greater energy, through better nutrition, they would not necessarily have to work so much more strenuously than the agrarians in order to maintain a much more robust skeletal frame. Their hormonal systems being perfectly balanced, they could build up strong muscles and bones without endless hours of pumping iron. It may be possible that because many of them were overflowing with health and life energy, that they would, like other primates burn off extra energy and build up great strength by simply playing around, or wandering about- not out of some necessity, but rather as a pleasant way to spent their leisure time and excess energy.

On the contrary, the agrarian persuasion, no matter how much physical toil they underwent, without the proper nutrition provided by our evolutionary diet, they would inevitably be stunted. There is plenty of evidence that suggest that their weakened bone structures could be a result of poor nourishment, and not lack of exercise. Many feudal surfs worked themselves into decrepitude in order to keep up with the physical demands of agrarian society.  They were unable to regenerate fast enough to keep up with the physical demands, and many skeletons are found of young neolithic people with rotten teeth, and degenerative bone disease.

There are signs of bone degeneration, along with the inability to regenerate, in neolithic man, which point to evidence that there must be some nutritional / other environmental components responsible for the weakening of our bone structures.
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