Author Topic: Fragrance sensitivity.  (Read 5598 times)

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Offline Taz

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Fragrance sensitivity.
« on: February 21, 2016, 07:48:54 am »
I've always got wheezie when someone sprayed alot of perfume around me. Then some time ago i noticed when i tried to make some flaxseed gel for my hair, i put in some lavender essential oil in it, my eyes got all red watery, and my nose started to run.

Then today when i washed my hair (i only wash it once a week) i put some conditioner in it (usually only wash with water). After it dried i my eyes got burning, red, watery, nose started to run, i got whoozie and my scalp was intching.  Sometimes with some soaps and laundry detergent, i get red skin rashes from.

So i wonder if anyone have knowledge about this? Is there anyway to get stronger against it? Or how can i smell somewhat good?

Offline Taz

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Re: Fragrance sensitivity.
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2016, 07:51:44 am »
I came across an interesting text.
http://www.westonaprice.org/holistic-healthcare/is-it-mental-or-is-it-dental/

In it i quote

"The people who were born in the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s tended to drink and smoke. They had teeth extracted, root canals and metal fillings, yet they are generally not the chemically sensitive individuals we see in our population today, young people in their twenties who can’t handle even a little bit of lavender scent in the room."

I dont know if he means that old peoples way to live in the 20s, 30s and 40s made the young people of today such as myself sensitive to chemicals, or that the way they lived made them strong against them.

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Fragrance sensitivity.
« Reply #2 on: February 21, 2016, 08:27:19 am »
Eat fewer carbs, more fat, and take some vitamin D or eat some wild fatty ocean fish. I also have allergy issues, and these things all help.

Offline Alive

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Re: Fragrance sensitivity.
« Reply #3 on: February 21, 2016, 08:57:38 am »
I had this problem too for several years, now I've become stronger I'm fine and can even use fragrances on myself.

I agree with CK on reducing carbs; one of my major diet improvements has been to go low carb, / ketogenic, while eating lots of low carb greens and other veges.

Offline svrn

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Re: Fragrance sensitivity.
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2016, 05:55:34 am »
I came across an interesting text.
http://www.westonaprice.org/holistic-healthcare/is-it-mental-or-is-it-dental/

In it i quote

"The people who were born in the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s tended to drink and smoke. They had teeth extracted, root canals and metal fillings, yet they are generally not the chemically sensitive individuals we see in our population today, young people in their twenties who can’t handle even a little bit of lavender scent in the room."

I dont know if he means that old peoples way to live in the 20s, 30s and 40s made the young people of today such as myself sensitive to chemicals, or that the way they lived made them strong against them.

I have little to no problem from smoking natural tobacco. I have little to no problem from a samll to less than moderate amount of natural alcohol. However fragrances make me very noticeably nauseous and will sometime give me an instant headache. I think they are much worse than smoking or drinking.
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Offline dariorpl

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Re: Fragrance sensitivity.
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2016, 12:13:42 am »
I got in a taxi cab the other day and I was slightly winded because I was carrying heavy bags and had to run a bit to catch the taxi. It was an old car. Usually this doesn't bother me. The first thing I noticed when I got in was a strong scent of burning incense, which I used to enjoy a few years ago, but now avoid due to it's toxicity. After about a minute in the car, I realized there was no burning incense in the car, it was just a fragrance. Then I noticed the heat was on, the driver was a frail guy, dressed in thick clothes, it was obvious the mild temperature outside was too cold for him. Then I realized that it must be the heat that was giving out the incense fragrance. I was still trying to catch my breath, but it felt like no matter how much air I rushed into my lungs, there was no oxygen in there. I rolled down both the back windows and almost had to stick my head out to be able to get a small amount of fresh air. In retrospect, I should've gotten out of that taxi and found another one right then, but I didn't. At one point I started to think that the heating might even be leaking exhaust gases back into the car or something, because it was truly horrible, I felt like I could barely breathe. Well I could breathe just fine, but I felt like that air was not oxygenating me in any way. My blood pressure dropped somewhat and my head was spinning a little bit. I can't say to what extent this was caused by the incense fragrance, but regular incense never caused this effect on me, or anything even remotely like it.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2016, 01:37:24 am by dariorpl »
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