Author Topic: How Whales Change Climate  (Read 1376 times)

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Offline Iguana

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How Whales Change Climate
« on: August 08, 2017, 03:43:30 pm »
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: How Whales Change Climate
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2017, 06:31:23 pm »
http://www.popsci.com/article/science/have-wolves-really-saved-yellowstone#page-2

There has already been a lot of data on how the extinction of the large megafauna directly led to the destruction of the climate. Australian Aborigines allegedly caused the desertification of Australia by wiping out the giant marsupials etc.:-

https://instaar.colorado.edu/news-events/instaar-news/arid-australian-interior-linked-to-landscape-burning-by-ancient-humans/
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Offline surfsteve

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Re: How Whales Change Climate
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2017, 01:09:17 am »
How Whales Change Climate
Weird. I would have thought that the whales dying off would be good for the plankton too. Makes me wonder if humans impact is as bad as we think it is. Though it doesn't seem likely maybe we have a good impact on the environment as well. Or at least better than we think it does. We grow crops in the desert where they wouldn't exist and there is always more green area in small cities. What is the problem then? Were we good for the environment at one time and have progressed beyond our usefulness in that respect? Have we reached maturity as a society and are now in the decline or death phase? Or are we just overlooking some aspect of our usefulness of the ecosystem? Who really knows?

Offline Iguana

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Re: How Whales Change Climate
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2017, 02:53:01 am »
Most of the deserts are human made and they extend ever more due to agriculture and cattle farming, specially sheep and goats! Cities have been built mostly where there were forests — or at least some kind of vegetation — earlier!

We could probably have been somewhat useful to the ecosystems before we started to use the fire, set forests on fire and released in our excrement all kinds of stinking noxious and polluting compounds produced by cooking.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

 

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