Author Topic: post workout nutrition  (Read 13225 times)

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Offline instant

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post workout nutrition
« on: October 02, 2009, 01:26:19 am »
What doe your pre and post workout nutrition look like?
 --- Mainstream athletes recommend some type of protein / carb shake pre-post workout..
      fat should be avoided because it stops Growth Hormone after a workout..

is this true?

I been using 24liver tablets pre and post workout
24 tabs = 4 ounces of liver.


Offline DeadRamones

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2009, 01:37:42 am »
Fats are typically avoided because it slows down the insulin response. PWO nutrition really depends on your goals. I noticed for me a 2 bananas along some protein help me recover really quick. There are a few theories on what kind of carbs to take after a workout(fast vs slow absorbing). Everybody is different so I would recommend experimenting & seeing what works for you.

Liver tabs? Why not just eat liver?

Offline SkinnyDevil

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2009, 02:32:59 am »
Today was 4 large raw oysters following my workout.

2 hours later a 1/2 pound of steak.

I usually drink water and wait 15-20 minutes before eating, unless it's a light workout.
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Offline instant

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2009, 03:39:38 am »
liver is not pleasant tasting... i cant stomach it..

i was thinking of raw milk pre-post... but there is alot of fat in this..

Offline RawZi

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2009, 05:33:13 am »
liver is not pleasant tasting... i cant stomach it..

i was thinking of raw milk pre-post... but there is alot of fat in this..

    Eat a hunk of raw lean meat, problem solved, no?
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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2009, 06:10:18 am »
I don't think fat stops HGH production, carbs do. The carbs give the insulin response which is a growth hormone, but not a healthy one to have in high production.

I used to drink protein shakes and force feed myself after workouts, and all day long. Now I just eat when I'm hungry. That's my post workout routine, to continue to eat when I'm hungry. Sometimes I don't eat right after a workout, and I figure that just adds to my bodies conditioning to be able to deal with stuff. Many athletes follow the "Warrior Diet" and only eat a lot at the end of the day, not much after some workouts.

Offline instant

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2009, 10:59:37 pm »
Im not sure because united states weight lifters are very large and ybodybuilding is very old, it seems they must have it down to a science.. although what they do may not be the healthiest, but it deffinitly gives great results.

i want todo find a balance, health lifestyle but gain muscle..

Offline SkinnyDevil

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2009, 11:58:12 pm »
There is no secret to gaining muscle.

Resistance training.

You stress the muscles with weight - as heavy as you can go for a handful of reps (about 5). Balance this with a few sets of lower weight, higher reps to start.

Arnold actually kept the reps between 12 and 15 per set, but paused & flexed for max contraction at the peak of each rep. But the big thing is maximum resistance.

Beat up a muscle group once or twice a weak, move on the next day to a different muscle group.

And EAT like crazy. The healthier the food, the better.
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Offline instant

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2009, 12:30:27 am »
i try this then

Offline ezekiel

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2009, 06:11:31 am »
I usually lose appetite after workouts.
Just water for me.

Offline kurite

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2010, 01:16:30 pm »
I have a tennis trainer that regularly works out and he is huge. He drinks raw milk post workout and and through out the day takes beef liver tablets. I felt i had to post this because of the crazy coincidence.
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Offline Paleo Donk

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2010, 10:58:02 pm »
I don't eat anything post workout and before for that matter. Art Devany has an article out somewhere stating that gene expression works best in a glycogen depleted environment. I believe it takes at least 2 days to repair muscles to the level of strength they were, and so eating something right after should do nothing to make the muscle stronger. Eating after working out will probably replenish glycogen stores faster but this seems meaningless for muscle growth.

Offline Hannibal

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2010, 11:58:55 pm »
I usually lose appetite after workouts.
Just water for me.
I feel the same way.
I stick to my one meal, that lasts several hours and I feel good.
First I eat some fruits and after 1 hour I start to eat my meat-and-fat meal. In some other days I only eat honey as a source of carbs.
Do you blame vultures for the carcass they eat?
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Offline Ouchburns

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2010, 03:46:44 am »
I don't eat anything post workout and before for that matter. Art Devany has an article out somewhere stating that gene expression works best in a glycogen depleted environment. I believe it takes at least 2 days to repair muscles to the level of strength they were, and so eating something right after should do nothing to make the muscle stronger. Eating after working out will probably replenish glycogen stores faster but this seems meaningless for muscle growth.

Amino acids in the blood are a must for rebuilding muscles and replenishing ATP (adenosine triphosphate) during workings to allow for the muscle to be fatigued enough to cause muscle hyperatrophy. Eating immedietely after a workout (I pop 2 eggs) is definetely require to build muscle and prevent catabolism.

Offline Hannibal

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #14 on: March 03, 2010, 04:33:16 am »
I depends on how much glycogen we've losted.
A workout containing 24 work sets = 60 extra grams of glucose.
Here's a good article - http://www.bodyrecomposition.com/nutrition/how-many-carbohydrates-do-you-need.html
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Livin' off the raw grass fat of the land

Offline Paleo Donk

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #15 on: March 03, 2010, 08:05:56 am »
Amino acids in the blood are a must for rebuilding muscles and replenishing ATP (adenosine triphosphate) during workings to allow for the muscle to be fatigued enough to cause muscle hyperatrophy. Eating immedietely after a workout (I pop 2 eggs) is definetely require to build muscle and prevent catabolism.

I'd start listening if there were some randomly controlled clinical trials but if not then I can't seem to make a case for eating after lifting. Muscles take 2-3 days to heal and recouperate the strength lost from tearing them apart from intense lifting. Feeding your body a bit of amino acids immediately after lifting is likely to do nothing for them and could even get in the way of repair, but I'm guessing it doesn't matter much each way. There are always free floating amino acids in the blood stream anways, unless you have starved yourself for a couple days. Are you muscles going to magically not grow if you don't feed them right after you work out?

It seems like you are bodybuilder, the likes of whom I despise. I'm working on getting over this abhorrence, so I apologize. I have no interest in sarcoplasmic hypetropy - useless fluid-filled muscles.

I've had lots of success not eating before or after strength training.

Hannibal - that number could change for low-carb adapted athletes but thanks for posting it.

Offline klowcarb

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #16 on: March 03, 2010, 09:46:14 am »
I agree, Paleodonk. It is like those damn bodybuilders who think they need an insulin spike after working out to gain muscle, and actually injest dextrose. Disgusting.

I eat my nightly meal if I work out in the evening or in the morning, at the same time. On Saturdays I train early after eating a little, and don't eat again for 10-12 hours. I have gained muscle and got better abdominal leanness--at the same time--this way.

Growth hormone is disturbed by frequent eating.

Offline Hannibal

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #17 on: March 03, 2010, 02:57:36 pm »
Hannibal - that number could change for low-carb adapted athletes but thanks for posting it.
Read the article and you will see that the author is talking a lot about LCD and VLCKD. He is friendly towards this kind of eating.
60 grams of glucose is required even if you're perfectly adapted to the burning of fat. It is the result of what the anaerobic bodybuilding exercises are.
Do you blame vultures for the carcass they eat?
Livin' off the raw grass fat of the land

Offline Ouchburns

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #18 on: March 03, 2010, 10:30:24 pm »
It seems like you are bodybuilder, the likes of whom I despise. I'm working on getting over this abhorrence, so I apologize. I have no interest in sarcoplasmic hypetropy - useless fluid-filled muscles.

We all have our routines, and eating regimens, mine seem to work for me, so Im going to stick to them....for now. Views on optimal nutritional intake are ever changing, and I dont think that they are as important for raw meat eaters like us.

I enjoy lifting weights, and I do lift very heavy. All of my workouts are focused on increasing lean body mass, and strength. Im not lifting purely for aesthetics, for what reason do you lift weights? I do enjoy bodybuilding, but I do not see why you would despise someone who follows an all natural regimen or raw eating and enjoys the hobby of bodybuilding/powerlifting, can you please explain?

Offline Paleo Donk

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2010, 03:55:07 am »
We all have our routines, and eating regimens, mine seem to work for me, so Im going to stick to them....for now. Views on optimal nutritional intake are ever changing, and I dont think that they are as important for raw meat eaters like us.

I enjoy lifting weights, and I do lift very heavy. All of my workouts are focused on increasing lean body mass, and strength. Im not lifting purely for aesthetics, for what reason do you lift weights? I do enjoy bodybuilding, but I do not see why you would despise someone who follows an all natural regimen or raw eating and enjoys the hobby of bodybuilding/powerlifting, can you please explain?

I should in a perfect egoless world just let the bodybuilders do their thing without judgment but I'm stricken in my insecure emotionfull mind with a preponderously sized ego to feed so this is where the hate comes from. Most of the time I do not care what other people do when they lift, but sometimes I get the urge to tell them how utterly wrong they are inspite of the fact that I myself could be wrong.

A good example of this came up when you said the likely nonsense that you had to eat immediately after lifting to gain strength. I get angry when I see such crap touted as the truth. What other nonsense do you guys espouse? I hate knowing that so much misinformation is going to be spread around. I dislike our current medical system and most doctors and baseball managers and financial analysts and talk radio hosts and so many more the same way.

Bodybuilding culture implies steroid use, which I would assume there is a high probablity of you having taken it(sorry if this is a wrong conclusion). People willing to risk long-term health for short-term gains. There is so much wrong with bodybuilders - the total time they work out, the minimal strength associated with their muscles, the limited range of motion because of the muscle size, the limited functionality of such muscles, the scar tissue you build up over the years, the endless use of machines that allow you to help you say "I lift very heavy". Its just all a scam like the AHA's diet for diabetics. There are very simple solutions to both gaining strength and ending diabetes yet thanks to some powerful idiots we have a convoluted shit storm that keeps people from finding a simple truth.

Offline Ouchburns

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2010, 04:24:45 am »
I should in a perfect egoless world just let the bodybuilders do their thing without judgment but I'm stricken in my insecure emotionfull mind with a preponderously sized ego to feed so this is where the hate comes from. Most of the time I do not care what other people do when they lift, but sometimes I get the urge to tell them how utterly wrong they are inspite of the fact that I myself could be wrong.

A good example of this came up when you said the likely nonsense that you had to eat immediately after lifting to gain strength. I get angry when I see such crap touted as the truth. What other nonsense do you guys espouse? I hate knowing that so much misinformation is going to be spread around. I dislike our current medical system and most doctors and baseball managers and financial analysts and talk radio hosts and so many more the same way.

Bodybuilding culture implies steroid use, which I would assume there is a high probablity of you having taken it(sorry if this is a wrong conclusion). People willing to risk long-term health for short-term gains. There is so much wrong with bodybuilders - the total time they work out, the minimal strength associated with their muscles, the limited range of motion because of the muscle size, the limited functionality of such muscles, the scar tissue you build up over the years, the endless use of machines that allow you to help you say "I lift very heavy". Its just all a scam like the AHA's diet for diabetics. There are very simple solutions to both gaining strength and ending diabetes yet thanks to some powerful idiots we have a convoluted shit storm that keeps people from finding a simple truth.

Your assumption about me using steroids is entirely wrong. Im 25 years old and have been into bodybuilding for approximetely 4 years. The first 3 years of it have been spent cutting off about 130lbs of fat. While trying to maintain as much lean mass as possible. Yes bodybuilding does have a negative conotation associated with steroid usage, non functional strength and very short life spans due to the drug abuse, and terribly unhealthy diets., but I do not fall into this catagory of bodybuilders.

I didnt say that eating immedietely after lifting is required to gain strength but it is working for me. I feel that My pre workout nutrition (which is my first meal of the day) of 2 eggs 30-45 minutes prior to my workout is essential before lifting, due to me being in a fasted state for approximetely 13 hours prior to lifting. I also feel that my post workout nutrition is also essential to my success due to the fact that all the aminos in my blood have probably been utilized during my workout.

Now your saying that I use all machines? Where are you getting this assumption from? Im quite proud of my 2.5x bodyweight deadlift as well as my 500lb squat. My bench is lacking, but I do have terrible leverages for it, but it is something that Im working on. I actually do use very few machines when Im lifting. My physical culture is VERY, VERY different from most  when it comes to bodybuilding, diet and views on the whole scene in general. I laught at all the add in muscle magazines, and the supplements that the pro's claim to take, that which give them their massive physiques. I too am angry about all the misinformation floating around, it so vast that nobody can possibly know what is right and what is wrong, especially when it comes to nutrition. In my opinion nutrition is PURELY individual, and should be prescribed individually. People may use other people dietary models as guidelines, but must make adjusts to it so that it suits their needs.

Offline Paleo Donk

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2010, 04:36:54 am »
lol...reading comprehension

Eating immedietely after a workout (I pop 2 eggs) is definetely require to build muscle and prevent catabolism.

Quote
I didnt say that eating immedietely after lifting is required to gain strength but it is working for me.

You don't seem to know the difference between bodybuilding and strength training which is causing much of the confusion. Lifting weights does not equal bodybuilding. Lifting weights can be powerlifting, oly lifting, bodybuilding or general functional strength training. If you are squatting and deadlifting and lifting for lean functional muscle then you are not by a simple definition, bodybuilding.

By the way, you do not have a 500lb squat. You aren't going low enough.

Offline Ouchburns

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2010, 04:56:33 am »
lol...reading comprehension

You don't seem to know the difference between bodybuilding and strength training which is causing much of the confusion. Lifting weights does not equal bodybuilding. Lifting weights can be powerlifting, oly lifting, bodybuilding or general functional strength training. If you are squatting and deadlifting and lifting for lean functional muscle then you are not by a simple definition, bodybuilding.

By the way, you do not have a 500lb squat. You aren't going low enough.

Like I said, in my situation, it is required to eat PWO, and thats gospel, when it applies to me.

Now your making claims about my lifts, thats fine too, you know nothing about my physice, muscle fibre types, proportions etc... Im not going to sit here and argue with you, if you have head problems that you can cant get your mind around thats fine. Do you own thing, and be happy with it, it someone offers advice that is working and other people are asking for it, dont poopoo it. The way you eat has no scientific provings either, so I dont see where you get off.

I wont discuss this anymore.

Offline Ouchburns

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Re: post workout nutrition
« Reply #23 on: March 04, 2010, 05:02:47 am »
...btw, it is possible to lift for muscle size, definition and funtional strength at the same time. To lift the most efficient way for each is a whole other story.

 

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