Author Topic: Yuri recovery  (Read 147879 times)

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Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #125 on: June 28, 2009, 11:40:46 am »
Amazing Yuri.  I wondered what happened to you.  Glad to hear you're still kicking and mean as ever ;)

Ioanna is right, ignorance is not freedom.

Lex

Offline wodgina

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #126 on: June 28, 2009, 05:40:51 pm »

The problem maybe is that you try too hard...in everything you do. You became a lawyer...your an over achiever.
Sometimes you've got to hit rock bottom to rebuild..It sounds like your nearly there... or you might have already reached it.
Maybe what you need is the simple life.
Living in the village chopping wood and gardening.

Good Luck mate, I hope you well.




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Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #127 on: June 28, 2009, 11:46:45 pm »
Wow Andrew, what insight.  You are right.  Early in my life I was an over achiever and perfectionist.  Made myself quite ill until I learned to lighten up and enjoy life rather than fight it.

Lex

Offline wodgina

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #128 on: June 29, 2009, 01:10:23 am »


I think I'm giving myself advice.

My job situation has taken it's toll and I'm furiously attacking selection criteria at 1am on a Monday morning so I can get the  hell out. I've definitely over achieved (for my capabilities anyway!)

I'm going for easy jobs and a serious pay cut ;D



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Offline cjb

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #129 on: June 29, 2009, 02:11:25 am »
Wodgina,

What do you do now? I love the analogy, in ref. to what Lex and You were talking about re: trying too hard.  Just chopping wood and being in the village.  I guess this wasn't an analogy, actually, but I like the point you are making.  I keep trying to tell myelf--just relax, and then things go better.  Then you have energy to act when you wish and act with fortitude!

Offline Cosmo

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #130 on: June 29, 2009, 02:18:16 am »
Hey, Yuri.
I hope you're feeling much better and stronger now.
I've seen your pictures and decided to drop you a line. You don't look as if you're deficient in nutrients/minerals, your   hair looks great, skin looks very healthy and it's obvious to me that all the health troubles that you described in your journal were the signs of so called "healing crisis".
During healing crisis most of us experience mild depression, fatigue, brain fog, general feeling unwell etc.
It happened to me loads of times but I felt much stronger and happier afterwards.
So keep it in mind and don't give up.
As about kidney stones... how can you be so sure that you've got them? Have had any tests done? Kidney scan?
Full body scan?
Best wishes.
Cosmo
Eating raw fish and meat since 17.11.08. 99% raw since 25.04.08.

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #131 on: June 29, 2009, 04:42:01 am »
What I finally had to learn was that there was a huge difference between focusing on work you love to do until you sort of become lost in it and time just seems to stand still, and a relentless unreasonable pursuit of career advancement and/or perfection.  I wasted so many years trying to prove to others that I was worthy of advancement up the ladder of success, but in truth, hated what I was doing, and by extension, myself.  Once I gave up the quest for status and the admiration of others, and just focused on what I truly enjoyed doing, life became a joy and people who used to avoid me like the plague began to seek me out.

It is a difficult lesson to learn because our modern society places so much importance on status.  Usually this amounts nothing more than appearance over substance.  When I stopped trying to climb over the backs of others, and began to fold my hands in an effort to give those more talented than myself a boost, my whole life, career and all turned around for the better.  Since about age 30 I've not wasted another moment of time doing things I found distasteful to impress others.  Rather, I've focused on the things I'm passionate about.

Here's a recent example of what I'm talking about:  A neighbor and I are both retired and we live off of our investments and interest.  Seeing that banks are not paying much interest, my neighbor suggested that we go together and purchase a "fixer upper" house that recently went on the market in our neighborhood.  His reasoning was that we could get it for a much reduced price and then spend the next couple of years replacing the roof, making repairs, painting, and all the other tasks that go into restoring the house to habitable condition.  Over 3 to 5 years we could easily double our money or maybe more.  I declined because I don't like painting, plumbing, roofing, or the host of other required work.  I decided long ago that as long as I had enough money to pay my few bills and live my simple lifestlye, then I would never do work that I didn't want to do - no matter how much it paid.

I'm far from rich in the sense of money, but I wake up every morning with a zest for life and excited about what I'm going to do that day. This is something money can't buy.

Lex

Offline Cosmo

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #132 on: June 29, 2009, 03:22:34 pm »

I'm far from rich in the sense of money, but I wake up every morning with a zest for life and excited about what I'm going to do that day. This is something money can't buy.


Hey, Lex.
I totally agree - you can't buy happiness or love, and you can't take money and status with you when you die. Life is too short and we need to enjoy every minute of it, and we must remember that the best things in life are free - beautiful friendships, a walk in the park, stargazing etc.
Here's one of my favourite songs called "Simple Life" by June Christy, it perfectly reflects my new state of mind (except for mashed patatoes) :D.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBoM_ojLNvU

Eating raw fish and meat since 17.11.08. 99% raw since 25.04.08.

Offline rawlion

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #133 on: July 10, 2009, 01:37:43 am »
Salute!

No matter what happens with me next, I just wanted to tell you all that I love you!

Lex and all, thanks for the kind words. I appreciate your support very much.

I’m currently in Kyiv. Don’t even know what I’m doing here. I live in my brother’s apartment. Yes, I have a brother. He is 10 years older. My brother is the only person who could help me in this life. I don’t have job and can’t work so I’m dependent person right now. Wholly dependent on him. And lack of understanding on his part makes me unsure about my future. He is already on edge regarding my illness. He thinks I’m healthy and just lazy. He believes I’m pretending. He says that nobody in this country has condition such as mine. So naturally he disregards my complains. He still gives me some money for food so I’m able to continue my struggle. And I’m thankful to him for that.

You know William, as long as diet is concerned, I have to admit that I wasn’t as lucky as you were. You see, it was so simple for you… You adopted intermittent fasting and it worked for you, you ate high fat raw zero carbohydrate diet and you were fine on it. The same can be said about Lex, Geoff and others. They embarked on certain diets which worked for them in the first place. Unfortunately, it was not my case. Actually it was, and now I realize it, but I was stupid enough to look for perfection. When I first introduced raw meats into my life I was following AV’s Primal Diet. Four months were enough to turn my health 180 degrees. It is still vivid in my memory how energetic, vigorous and strong I was. Every cell of my body was alive and radiant. For the first time since my vegan experiment I enjoyed physical and mental health. There is a very wise saying, let well be alone or the best is the enemy of the good… I didn’t listen to reason and got punished. So, in search of perfection, I decided to try intermittent fasting. It just made so much sense. Besides, it was so convenient… I believed in it so much that I was continuing it despite obvious negative signs. I kept telling myself that it was adaptation period and that the hunger, shakiness and slowness of movements will go away as soon as my body gets used to the new regimen. I started looking for other reasons of my sudden decline. I though how intermittent fasting could be the culprit if other did it successfully? I was too naïve. Finally, zero carb finished me off. It was the last straw to break camel's back. As a result I developed kidney stones [actually, I saw them myself on the monitor, four 6 millimetres stones, two in each kidney] and it was the end of my hopes. My health began to really quickly fail after that.

You know Andrew, that is why I decided to go to my village. Yes, to be engaged in chopping wood and gardening. I even adjusted my diet accordingly. However, as I have found, dealing with wood and garden requires considerable effort and stamina. I was obviously too weak to do that.

I was thinking that perhaps this my life path was not right from the outset… If I remained in my pond and never attempted to move to the higher caste I would never had to go through this. I would never learn English, never knew about diets and Aajonus… But deep down I feel that was the right choice. That was my dream and I followed it. I tried my best and I succeeded. And if I was given right now the opportunity to choose my fate I wouldn’t change anything. I wouldn’t swap for anything in the world those hilarious six years at the University, the feeling of enormous pride when receiving my honourable diploma, the lot. Even now, only at the age of 25, I feel like my life is complete. I have accomplished what I strived for. And I respect myself for that. As for my illness, even now, when my life is in balance, I do regard it as a game. And until it is game on, I’ll exert my every effort, strain my every nerve and move heaven and earth to stay in it…

ave
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Offline Cosmo

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #134 on: July 10, 2009, 05:05:27 am »
Hey, Yuri!
Your English is great, where did you learnt it? I bet you can find a job as a translator.
As about your kidney stones, I'd like to suggest conducting a 24 hour water-melon fast ( eating nothing but water melons all day). Water-melon juice dissolves kidney stones.
Hope it helps.
Good luck.
Cosmo
Eating raw fish and meat since 17.11.08. 99% raw since 25.04.08.

Offline reyyzl

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #135 on: July 10, 2009, 05:32:21 am »
Hello Precious One,

    We love you too.

    It's very difficult having to live with people that don't understand. In this country too, certain illnesses 'do not exist' anymore.  It's a shame people aren't more open minded, but we have to accept some things as they are unless they are ready to change. It's good he's giving you support.  I wish you could be with dieters on the forum.

    I have not tried zero carb.  Thank you for all your experiences.  It's quite common and probably normal in young people to try for better and better.  I wish you well.

    What are you eating now?  What kind of exercise or other things are you able to practice?

    We have to keep trying.  My health may not be as bad as yours, but my family has made health improvements by us eating RAF.  You are very caring.  I hope you get well, and soon!

    Are you strong enough to talk on the phone?  Do you have access to a phone?  If you have the inclination to talk, I am here.

    reyyzl
"A genuine RPDer should always live by the coast." -TylerDurden Global Moderator Mammoth Hunter

Too often we get caught up trying to get to the end. What is most important however is to discover the beginning. We don’t solve problems or start to heal unless we can be willing, be kind, laugh a little and commit to seeking until we find. If we can, we’ll get started. I’ll meet you at the beginning!
“Reflections on My Travels…India” by Michael J Tamura ~ pg. 57

Offline rawlion

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #136 on: July 10, 2009, 05:53:15 am »
Hi Cosmo

Well, I think I've been too hasty saying that I had learnt English. Obviously, I'm still learning... I have to say that English is my love, my passion...

Yes, I could be a translator. This is actually my second profession. I even have a Master's Degree with a corresponding diploma. Ukrainian is my mother tongue, I know Russian perfectly, Spanish a little bit... So, plenty of options ;)

As regarding my stones they are the history. They appeared as a result of dietary habits inappropriate for my body [zero carb leads to ketosis and uric acid stones form only when the urine is acidic at 5.5 or less] coupled with overconsumption of sweetbreads, namely thyroid gland, which is high in purines [uric acid stones result from a problem metabolizing purines]. In fact, purines are good, only if you don't have problems metabolizing them... http://www.pumpa.org.uk/about.php
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Offline reyyzl

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #137 on: July 10, 2009, 06:40:45 am »
    You are so full of information.  You did eat the thyroid raw?
"A genuine RPDer should always live by the coast." -TylerDurden Global Moderator Mammoth Hunter

Too often we get caught up trying to get to the end. What is most important however is to discover the beginning. We don’t solve problems or start to heal unless we can be willing, be kind, laugh a little and commit to seeking until we find. If we can, we’ll get started. I’ll meet you at the beginning!
“Reflections on My Travels…India” by Michael J Tamura ~ pg. 57

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #138 on: July 10, 2009, 06:45:34 am »
It's been my impression that it is cooked zero carb that is acid-forming, and raw should be little or no problem. AFAIK all the published studies were done on ketosis with cooked.
The only organ meat I've eaten is a piece of liver now and then, maybe once a week.

The raw zero carb with tallow has been a splendid success for me, but there was lethargy until I increased the proportion of tallow to the estimated 80%.

Of course I am old and convalescent from one of the horrible modern diseases, so YMMV, and I am also full of (Bing) cherries right now, which might be affecting my mind.    ;)

Offline reyyzl

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #139 on: July 10, 2009, 07:41:23 am »
    William, what is YMMV?
"A genuine RPDer should always live by the coast." -TylerDurden Global Moderator Mammoth Hunter

Too often we get caught up trying to get to the end. What is most important however is to discover the beginning. We don’t solve problems or start to heal unless we can be willing, be kind, laugh a little and commit to seeking until we find. If we can, we’ll get started. I’ll meet you at the beginning!
“Reflections on My Travels…India” by Michael J Tamura ~ pg. 57

William

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #140 on: July 10, 2009, 07:57:19 am »
    William, what is YMMV?

Your Mileage May Vary
- seen on fuel consumption figures for new cars, means they are not all the same.

Offline reyyzl

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #141 on: July 10, 2009, 08:05:19 am »
    I climb, run, walk, leap and so on, no new cars here.  Great! (-:
"A genuine RPDer should always live by the coast." -TylerDurden Global Moderator Mammoth Hunter

Too often we get caught up trying to get to the end. What is most important however is to discover the beginning. We don’t solve problems or start to heal unless we can be willing, be kind, laugh a little and commit to seeking until we find. If we can, we’ll get started. I’ll meet you at the beginning!
“Reflections on My Travels…India” by Michael J Tamura ~ pg. 57

Offline wodgina

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #142 on: July 10, 2009, 08:21:01 am »
You guy's should read his journal before giving anymore 'diet' advice or water melon flushes!!! he's tried 
everything!  :)

I don't know the answer but all I can do is give some of my thoughts.

Diet is such a small piece of the equation, for me,  if I'm not doing what I want to do in life my mind plays tricks on me. I start getting anxious, convince myself I might be schizophrenic or I've got some crazy disease. It's horrible and once I'm in that black hole 'I can't see the forest for the tree's' so don't know how to get out.
“Integrity has no need of rules.”

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Offline rawlion

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #143 on: July 10, 2009, 04:55:19 pm »
You know William, you might be right regarding acidity of cooked zero carb diet. And I'm inclined to think that way as well. In my case it was the combination of the two, RAW thyroid and RAW zero carb, which did the damage. If either of these factors was isolated, the results might not have been such devastating... And I wouldn't eat thyroid under the normal circumstances, I just did that because I thought if I happened to have hypothyroid that should have definitely helped...
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Offline Cosmo

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #144 on: July 10, 2009, 05:10:11 pm »
You guy's should read his journal before giving anymore 'diet' advice or water melon flushes!!! he's tried 
everything!  :)


Hey, what is a water melon flush?? :-))))))))))))
Water melon FAST is great for kidney stones, I know quite a few people who tried it and cured their kidneys.
Water melons are only available for a couple of months in Ukraine ( in the end of summer)

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Offline Cosmo

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #145 on: July 10, 2009, 05:15:12 pm »
Hi Cosmo

Yes, I could be a translator. This is actually my second profession. I even have a Master's Degree with a corresponding diploma. Ukrainian is my mother tongue, I know Russian perfectly, Spanish a little bit... So, plenty of options ;)


That's really cool! I'd love to learn Spanish and move to Spain, probably to Barcelona.
I plan to visit Ukraine one day, I love Ukrainian staple food - raw pork fat (salo). I buy it all the time from a local Russian/Latvian shop.
Do you ever eat salo? It's supposed to be good for you. Do you ever eat raw egg yolks and raw liver?
Cosmo
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Offline rawlion

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #146 on: September 03, 2009, 06:24:34 pm »
I'm inclined to believe that INTERMITTENT FASTING has ruined my endocrine system. It was a direct and powerful onslaught on the adrenal glands that triggered major hormonal chaos.

The cited studies may explain the mechanism of adrenal depletion:

Fasting Alters Pulsatile and Rhythmic Cortisol Release in Normal Man

"The effect of a 5-day fast on integrated, pulsatile, and periodic cortisol release was studied in 10 normal men by measuring serum cortisol concentrations every 20 min for 24 h before (day 0) and during the fifth day of fasting (day 5). Serum concentration profiles were analyzed for integrated cortisol release (area under the curve), pulsatile hormone release by an objective, statistically based pulse detection algorithm (cluster analysis), and periodic hormone release (circadian and ultradian rhythms) by Fourier expansion time series analysis. Urinary cortisol excretion per 24 h was measured in 5 men. The mean 24-h integrated serum cortisol concentration increased 1.7-fold during fasting (P = 0.0006). This increase resulted from a 2-fold increase in the serum cortisol concentrations between pulses (valley mean; P = 0.0004), an increase in the pulse height (P = 0.001), and an increase in pulse increment above baseline (P = 0.01). There were no changes in the number of pulses per 24 h, the interval between pulses, the width of the pulses, or the area of the pulses during fasting. Twenty-four-hour urinary cortisol excretion increased in all men, and the mean urinary cortisol (nanomoles per L)/creatinine clearance (milliliters per s) ratio increased from 119 on day 0 to 187 on day 5 (n = 5; P = 0.05). The pattern of periodic hormone release also changed during fasting; the mean (±SE) circadian rhythm (24-h) amplitude decreased from 160 ± 14 nmol/L on day 0 to 102 ± 105 nmol/L on day 5 (P = 0.06), and the amplitude of the 12-h rhythm increased from 68 ± 11 to 99 ± 11 nmol/L. There also were significant increases in the amplitudes of rhythms with periodicities of 8.1, 4.1, 2.4, 1.6, and 1.3 h (P = 0.02–0.008). Fasting in normal men results in distinct changes in the amount and pattern of pulsatile, circadian, and ultradian cortisol release.

http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/68/6/1013

***

Dual Regulation of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-1 Levels by Insulin and Cortisol during Fasting

These data show that insulin and cortisol both regulate IGFBP-1 secretion during fasting; the effects of insulin and cortisol are strong during the course of fasting. Significant hypoglycemia stimulates a further rise in IGFBP-1, which seems to be regulated, in part, by cortisol. The cortisol-induced rise in IGFBP-1 during fasting and during hypoglycemia potentially serves to prevent the hypoglycemic effects of free IGFs.

http://tiny.cc/ijwBP

***

24-hour rhythmic cortisol secretion by fasting stress in midluteal phase women

"In summary, short-term caloric deprivation enhances daily cortisol secretion by 1.7-fold in healthy midluteal phase young women by selectively amplifying cortisol secretory burst mass and elevating the 24-h rhythmic cortisol mean. Augmentation of daily cortisol production occurs without any concomitant changes in cortisol pulse frequency or half-life or any disruption of the timing of the 24-h rhythmicity or orderliness of cortisol release. Fasting degrades the physiological coupling between cortisol and LH, cortisol and GH, and cortisol and leptin secretion otherwise evident in calorie-sufficient women. We conclude that the corticotropic axis in the young adult female is not resistant to the stress-activating effects of short-term nutrient deprivation, but, rather, evinces strong adaptive homeostasis both monohormonally (cortisol) and bihormonally (cortisol paired with GH, LH, and leptin).

http://tiny.cc/yYbth

***

Fasting as a metabolic stress paradigm selectively amplifies cortisol secretory burst mass and delays the time of maximal nyctohemeral cortisol concentrations in healthy men

"In conclusion, the present data indicate that starvation-induced enhancement of cortisol secretion in young healthy men is mediated by an increased glucocorticoid secretory burst mass, rather than changes in secretory burst frequency or duration or in cortisol half-life. In addition, fasting modifies the diurnal secretory pattern of cortisol by delaying maximal serum concentrations to the early afternoon. The inverse relationship between serum cortisol and GH responses to fasting suggests differential regulation of the corticotropic and somatotropic axis by the metabolic stress of fasting and/or feedback interactions between these two axes when they are both activated. "

http://tiny.cc/FJsUh

***

FREE CORTISOL IN OBESITY; EFFECT OF FASTING

"Plasma and urinary corticosteroids were measured in 13 obese subjects before and after high and low protein diets, and after fasting. During isocaloric high and low protein diets, urinary 17-oxogenic steroids and to a lesser extent urinary free cortisol excretion rose and fell in parallel with protein intake. Plasma unbound cortisol levels were not much changed by high or low protein intake.

However, during 7 to 11 days total fasting, there was a highly significant rise in plasma unbound cortisol at 24.00. A smaller rise occurred at 09.00. The overall effect was a considerable diminution of the day-night variation of plasma unbound cortisol levels during fasting, and a rise in prevailing unbound cortisol levels and urinary free cortisol excretion. In 3 subjects tested these changes were reversed immediately by glucose re-feeding."

http://www.eje-online.org/cgi/content/abstract/81/2/321

***

The effect of Ramadan fasting on maternal serum lipids, cortisol levels and fetal development

"In the fasting group, the maternal serum cortisol levels on day 20 were significantly higher than the initial levels obtained 1 week prior to Ramadan (p < 0.05)."

http://www.springerlink.com/content/h4w1840303242r0n/

***

increased salivary cortisol in response to three stressful conditions

"In the fasting stress experiment, students had higher salivary cortisol concentrations after fasting for 15 h than they did after the completion of the GTT. Even short-term fasting is sufficiently stressful to cause activation of the HPA axis and a rise in cortisol (2). Once fasting has ended, cortisol levels drop to basal values quickly (2, 26, 27). The cortisol decline during a GTT has been suggested to reflect a circadian fall in circulating plasma cortisol (27). Basal cortisol has a precipitous circadian drop in the first 4 h of the light cycle (17). While our class met after this time, our data do not refute the possibility of a circadian effect as there were no differences in cortisol concentrations between the fasting samples in this experiment and basal samples from either the presentation stress or competition stress experiments (P > 0.05). This suggests that the decrease in cortisol concentration may be due to a circadian rhythm or the combination of a circadian decline in cortisol and the end of the fasting stress. Another possibility is that glucose ingestion directly effects cortisol release through an unknown mechanism (27)."

http://tiny.cc/HTfHV

***

The effect of a single missed evening meal on the male reproductive axis

The male reproductive axis reacts more quickly to energetic imbalances than previously appreciated.

•Waking and 11AM salivary cortisol remained unchanged by missing a single meal. Previous studies found cortisol increases following fasting. The cortisol awakening response may have concealed any fasting-stress based salivary increase. Urinary cortisol (unconfounded by waking response) increased significantly following a single evening of fasting. This is consistent with the literature (Cameron 1996).
•Salivary ghrelin was not associated with fasting. Diurnal variation in ghrelin production likely overshadowed any increase in salivary ghrelin. Future studies will asses urinary ghrelin, a pooled overnight measure less confounded by diurnal variation.
•Salivary ghrelin was strongly negatively associated with waking salivary testosterone. Combined with previous research showing high ghrelin expression in the testes, and decreases in T after ghrelin administration in vitro, these results are suggestive of ghrelin as a mechanism decreasing testosterone production during fasting (Barreiro and Tena-Sempere 2004).

http://www.csss.washington.edu/Anniversary/Poster/BenTrumble.pdf

***

Insulin, glucagon, Cortisol and growth hormone release in association with physiological decrements in the plasma glucose concentrations in fasting men

"All subjects fasted the whole month and the average fasting time was about 16 hours. Venous blood samples were taken on four different days; one day before Ramadan (day zero), then on the first, 74t h and 28t h days of the month. In each of these four days, blood samples were taken at 4:00 PM (shortly before evening meal). At the end of the month, mean weight loss was 3.9 kg (p<0.05). Reduction in the mean plasma glucose concentration from 5.21'±0.37 mmol/L to 3.71 ±0.46 mmol/L were associated with increments in plasma glucagon (34.9±9.4 pmol/L; p<0.001) and Cortisol (378±154 nmol/L; p<0.05) at the end of fasting, and the increment in plasma growth hormone (GH) 169±39.5 pmol/L; p<0.05) only on day 14 of fasting."

http://tipdizini.turkiyeklinikleri.com/download_pdf.php?id=51646
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carnivore

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #147 on: September 03, 2009, 09:28:05 pm »
I read that caloric restriction or starvation increase cortisol production.

To my knowledge, Intermittent Fasting is not starvation (or should not be).

Offline rawlion

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #148 on: September 04, 2009, 12:22:57 am »

To my knowledge, Intermittent Fasting is not starvation (or should not be).


IF shouldn't be starvation, definitely, but body may perceive it as such...

This is still a conundrum for me why some people greatly benefit eating one meal daily and others do struggle severely. I've heard that some have so strong adrenals that it is simply impossible for them to get adrenal exhaustion.
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carnivore

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Re: Yuri recovery
« Reply #149 on: September 04, 2009, 03:23:53 am »
IF shouldn't be starvation, definitely, but body may perceive it as such...

This is still a conundrum for me why some people greatly benefit eating one meal daily and others do struggle severely. I've heard that some have so strong adrenals that it is simply impossible for them to get adrenal exhaustion.

Digestive ability can vary widely from one person to another. Not everybody can eat and assimilate enough food/calories on one sitting.
« Last Edit: September 04, 2009, 03:39:48 am by carnivore »

 

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