Author Topic: A day in the life of TylerDurden  (Read 235319 times)

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Offline Nicola

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2009, 08:33:32 pm »
(I've done some experiments when walking in the Alps, with a sort of equivalent  "raw pemmican"(ie nothing processed, just carrying with me some lean-meats mixed in with raw marrow or suet. of course, the stuff would rapidly rot due to the meat but I'd consume it mostly or wholly  within 5 days, regardless. Inevitably, by the 3rd day, I would be utterly exhausted, with no stamina, and no amount of the lean-meat/fat mixture would help re increasing endurance. I'd end up looking ridiculous and having to rest constantly for 5 minutes each time while other hikers sauntereed past me).


Your own quote:

I've always been a cynic so I'm not one for positive thinking, despite this diet.

This is what gets in your way!

Last year you mentioned going walking in the alps and marrow was ideal. You go to Italy and mention beforehand that you will be fasting and eating more fruit (hydration) a lot because of the heat. Well when you came back you say you need to fast because you had put on weight. It's all so confusing and negative; why - it's not doing you any good???

Nicola

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2009, 11:40:20 pm »
Your own quote:

I've always been a cynic so I'm not one for positive thinking, despite this diet.

This is what gets in your way!

Last year you mentioned going walking in the alps and marrow was ideal. You go to Italy and mention beforehand that you will be fasting and eating more fruit (hydration) a lot because of the heat. Well when you came back you say you need to fast because you had put on weight. It's all so confusing and negative; why - it's not doing you any good???

Nicola

I think you're confusing the issue.  I may have put on weight well after the holiday but that has nothing to do with the vacation. As for raw marrow, I find it an ideal food, it's just that without some raw carbs added, it becomes useless as regards physical endurance.

And my mood is a hell of a lot better than it was on a zero-carb diet. Plus, one can have a good mood but not necessarily be an optimist.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2009, 11:41:47 pm »
how much mineral water you drink during a water fast?


I drink more mineral water if I don't eat at all during the day  - litre and a half, perhaps? Two litres max, generally.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2009, 08:32:19 am »
...The standard explanation for this is NOT that carbs are  themselves unhealthy, but that the bacteria which feed on/digest carbs in the gut get wiped out if no carbs are consumed for long periods, thus making digestion of carbs more difficult.
Ah yes. I discussed something along those lines in Lex's journal.

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As regards the cooked-food-issue, I've heard claims that detox can be stopped if one readds enough cooked-foods(c.50% of diet?) - the Aajonus interpretation of that would be that that large an amount of cooked-foods overwhelms the body thus diverting the toxins into the fat-cells instead of them being expelled.
Interesting. It's at least plausible. It might be similar to how I didn't notice that gluten was doing a number on me because I was eating it so regularly that my body was constantly overwhelmed, resulting in a very gradual increase in chronic symptoms rather than a violent detox- or allergic-type reaction. It was only when I stopped eating gluten completely for over 3 weeks that my systems calmed down enough that a gluten challenge resulted in severe symptoms.

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(I notice that as I quickly get obese if I eat any cooked animal food).
I almost wish that would happen to me, ;-) as I'm rather thin (I was born thin)--although I'd rather have muscle. That's one reason I'm reticent to go 100% raw--I don't want to get even thinner.

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I wouldn't necessarily cal pemmican "socially acceptable". I've sen pictures of it and it sure looks disgusting in appearance.
Hah! Good one. Do you mean it looks like poop? :-D I think it kind of looks like brownies. I meant that it would be more socially acceptable than eating undried raw meat around other people. When I respond to questions with "I'm eating pemmican," people don't tend to freak out. If they ask me what it is, I say it's an old Indian convenience food. If I told them that pemmican is dried raw meat and fat they might freak out, though.

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Raw fruit, by contrast, is no big deal for SAD-eaters as they do it all the time.
I've tried it. It spoils a bit too easily, smells, is messy, etc., although I sometimes do bring an apple or banana or a few strawberries to work. Unfortunately, there's no kitchen with it's own trash receptacle in my office, so fruit remnants tend to stink up the place. Plus, I like to have at least some meat. Also, jerky and fruit just doesn't satisfy me as much as it used to, now that I'm getting used to fat, so pemmican seemed like the obvious next step.

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What I mean is that epigenetics can easily explain Inuit adaptation as effects of epigenetics(re the grandfather/smoking connection I gave you) as it can occur over after only a few generations and the Inuit lived at least 10,000 years in the Arctic(actually, given the Bering Strait crossover, it does seem more likely that they were in the Arctic from c.15,000 BC, but anyway).
Well, I read that they came over in waves, but if you're only talking a few generations, then it's a moot point. But then that raises the question of why I haven't adapted to the diet of the last 3 generations and more before me.

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As regards adaptation to grains, remember that human(or any other) DNA is extremely fluid. For example, I get a far lower reaction to grains than most rawpalaeos, yet I have a much stronger reaction any kind of dairy than most RPDers, as well. So, IMO, there must be some limited adaptation going on(even if not remotely 100%).
Oh sure, I haven't seen anyone claim that there has been no adaptation at all over the last 10,000 years, but most scientists I've seen discuss the subject claim that our genes are not "substantially" different from what they were 100-200,000 years ago--since the time of the last species change to homo sapiens sapiens. A few vegans/vegetarians/SADers I've come across claimed that 10,000 years is more than enough to become fully adapted to agrarian foods. I highly doubt it. There's just too much evidence to the contrary. Partially, yes--but fully?

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Re zero-carb:- What gets me re this is the notion of needing weeks or months to get any of the supposed benefits of zero-carb. When I first started the raw ZC diet, I was told to expect a few weeks(what Stefansson said), now it's several months or years if one believes the claims.Plus, if one so much as backslides, one has to go through the whole process all over again(though perhaps at a reduced rate). And for me, anything more than 6 weeks carb-free is avery dangerous.
I don't know. All I know is I've done better as I've cut back on the carbs. I think I'll try zero carb at some point, if for no other reason than to try it for myself and to be able to discuss it intelligently from experience with zero carbers. My guess is that I'll end up doing VLC over the long run--but I don't know aforehand.

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I'd imagine that an Inuit bred on a near-zero-carb diet since birth would not only be much less likely to get negative effects from eating any berries in the summer but they would be better placed re epigenetics etc. to
hunt etc. while on zero-carb.
Agreed. I think they would also be better placed than SADers, vegans and vegetarians. Just like it sometimes takes time for a dog who has only been fed cooked and processed meat to re-acclimate to raw meat.

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But it does seem a bit of an effort to wait for most of a lifetime to get the equivalent benefits that one can get on lc or vlc.
I have seen a ZCer admit that it took about a year to fully adapt to digesting 100% raw meat/fat/organs, though he reported that dramatic improvements began much earlier. It's taking me some time to adapt to animal fat (raw or cooked) and raw meat/organs too. Does that mean in your opinion I'm not adapted to eating those foods, even though I'm benefiting from them?
« Last Edit: May 27, 2009, 08:42:14 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2009, 08:04:51 pm »

I almost wish that would happen to me, ;-) as I'm rather thin (I was born thin)--although I'd rather have muscle. That's one reason I'm reticent to go 100% raw--I don't want to get even thinner.

Well, I hate to say this, but raw dairy is an effective weight-gainer for RVAFers(whether for 100% RVAFers or whatever). I've also found that if I add sufficient amounts of raw carbs that my weight goes up(and I'm 98-99% raw).1 or 2  partial-rawists have claimed that cooked-starches like potatoes were useful for weight-gain, though, understandably, I don't recommend that. Most RVAFers were, for obvious reasons given our current society, extremely obese prior to taking up RVAF diets, so they don't mind the usual weight-loss that comes with it.

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Hah! Good one. Do you mean it looks like poop? :-D I think it kind of looks like brownies. I meant that it would be more socially acceptable than eating undried raw meat around other people. When I respond to questions with "I'm eating pemmican," people don't tend to freak out. If they ask me what it is, I say it's an old Indian convenience food. If I told them that pemmican is dried raw meat and fat they might freak out, though.
I've tried it. It spoils a bit too easily, smells, is messy, etc., although I sometimes do bring an apple or banana or a few strawberries to work. Unfortunately, there's no kitchen with it's own trash receptacle in my office, so fruit remnants tend to stink up the place. Plus, I like to have at least some meat. Also, jerky and fruit just doesn't satisfy me as much as it used to, now that I'm getting used to fat, so pemmican seemed like the obvious next step.

Well, no the pemmican I saw just looked like some cross between spam and candlewax.

Re fruit:- yes, it does spoil easily. However, that particularly applies to nonorganic fruit. I generally find that the higher the quality of the fruit, the longer it lasts. I've slowly come round to the whole notion of brix-values and am always looking around for higher-quality raw animal/raw plant-foods(I don't really trust the organic label, after various experiences).


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Well, I read that they came over in waves, but if you're only talking a few generations, then it's a moot point. But then that raises the question of why I haven't adapted to the diet of the last 3 generations and more before me.
Oh sure, I haven't seen anyone claim that there has been no adaptation at all over the last 10,000 years, but most scientists I've seen discuss the subject claim that our genes are not "substantially" different from what they were 100-200,000 years ago--since the time of the last species change to homo sapiens sapiens. A few vegans/vegetarians/SADers I've come across claimed that 10,000 years is more than enough to become fully adapted to agrarian foods. I highly doubt it. There's just too much evidence to the contrary. Partially, yes--but fully?

Given that natural selection became nonexistent sometime in the Palaeolithic(c.200,000 years ago?), it's unlikely that all segments of the human population would equally be resistant or adaptive to specific types of foods.Plus, from what I understand, epigenetics doesn't involve any real  alteration of DNA, just different gene-expression:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epigenetics



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I have seen a ZCer admit that it took about a year to fully adapt to digesting 100% raw meat/fat/organs, though he reported that dramatic improvements began much earlier. It's taking me some time to adapt to animal fat (raw or cooked) and raw meat/organs too. Does that mean in your opinion I'm not adapted to eating those foods, even though I'm benefiting from them?

I'm saying that adaptation to a healthy (raw)food should really  take only a few months(barring serious digestion-related issues like a seriously damaged liver/pancreas etc.) I can only base this on mine and others experience, of course(I took 8 months longer than most  because of the raw dairy, but that was because I was hyper-allergic to it, and it took that long for me to find that out). Most, on the other hand, find it only takes weeks or a couple of months to adjust(if they go 95%+ raw; as a result, it's usually recommended to go 85%+ raw to ensure rapid adaptation to raw.

It's just that the few raw, zero-carbers I've come across tend to mention still having issues 2-3 years after doing zero-carb. Well we'll see how things turn out in 10 years time.

Re doing zc:- I think it's very important to try out all the various kinds of diet first, whether raw vegan or zero-carb or whatever. So often as not, I've found that gurus from the various different disciplines all have something useful to say about a subject, and it's also true that no 1 guru(or human being, for that matter) is 100% infallible, so it pays to do as much experimentation on one's own as possible.



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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #30 on: May 28, 2009, 05:19:13 am »
Re fruit:- yes, it does spoil easily. However, that particularly applies to nonorganic fruit. I generally find that the higher the quality of the fruit, the longer it lasts. I've slowly come round to the whole notion of brix-values and am always looking around for higher-quality raw animal/raw plant-foods(I don't really trust the organic label, after various experiences).

What experiences did you have that made you distrust the organic label? Do you mostly buy locally grown or wild plant foods now?

Did you buy a "brix" meter and do you test the fruit/veggie juices yourself for sucrose (mineral) content? Or do you just judge by the taste (sweetness only?) How reliable are these tests since most hybrid plants are bred to have higher levels of sugars..? oh and meat can actually have a brix index? How do you even test that?

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #31 on: May 28, 2009, 08:15:06 am »
Well, I hate to say this, but raw dairy is an effective weight-gainer for RVAFers(whether for 100% RVAFers or whatever).
Dairy is one of the foods that has the worst effects on me, unfortunately--including raw.

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I've also found that if I add sufficient amounts of raw carbs that my weight goes up(and I'm 98-99% raw).
I was eating more carbs than most Paleos in an effort to gain weight, but my health was declining as a result. So I cut back on the carbs and am doing much better, but I still have the issue of being overly thin. I've been hoping that increasing the fats and lifting weights might help, and I have put on a few pounds, but I'm hoping to add more. I see guys like the Primal diet guy who was thinner than me, went Primal and quickly added a lot of muscle and fat as a result (I'm more interested in adding muscle), and I wonder if I hit a diet right if I might get that sort of result too, or if the before-and-after success photo people just have genes with more muscle growth potential.

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1 or 2  partial-rawists have claimed that cooked-starches like potatoes were useful for weight-gain, though, understandably, I don't recommend that. Most RVAFers were, for obvious reasons given our current society, extremely obese prior to taking up RVAF diets, so they don't mind the usual weight-loss that comes with it.
I was flabby and had a beer belly (from carbs, not beer) before going Paleo, though not hugely obese and I still had thin limbs, but now people nag me because they think I look too thin (though I'm actually back to the way I was in my 20's). It's ironic that some of the people who complain to me about being fat refuse to eat like I do because I look too thin. Somehow they don't see the contradiction.

[/quote]Re fruit:- yes, it does spoil easily. However, that particularly applies to nonorganic fruit. I generally find that the higher the quality of the fruit, the longer it lasts. I've slowly come round to the whole notion of brix-values and am always looking around for higher-quality raw animal/raw plant-foods(I don't really trust the organic label, after various experiences).[/quote]
I eat mostly organic, but have been thinking about going all-organic. I would prefer not to have to give up pemmican and jerky for the multiple reasons I mentioned, but if it turns out they're harming me I'll definitely reconsider that.

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Given that natural selection became nonexistent sometime in the Palaeolithic(c.200,000 years ago?), it's unlikely that all segments of the human population would equally be resistant or adaptive to specific types of foods.Plus, from what I understand, epigenetics doesn't involve any real  alteration of DNA, just different gene-expression:-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epigenetics
That was my point as well and if I gave a different impression it was unintentional.

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I'm saying that adaptation to a healthy (raw)food should really  take only a few months(barring serious digestion-related issues like a seriously damaged liver/pancreas etc.)
Most of the people I've seen who said it took months to adapt to zero carb or all raw did have very serious digestion-related issues, but I'm pretty new to this forum.

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I can only base this on mine and others experience, of course(I took 8 months longer than most  because of the raw dairy, but that was because I was hyper-allergic to it, and it took that long for me to find that out).
I had a similar story. I didn't find out for decades until my doctor had me do a food challenge for dairy and then gluten and I improved both times, and then was tested and found to have very high antibodies to all dairy products and the components casein, whey and lactose (as well as gluten, wheat and many other grains). As an infant I also had mild digestive reactions to dairy fats, but was thought to have "grown out of it." The emphasis was always on trying to get kids like me to be able to eat the bad foods, with treatments like allergy shots. Eliminating dairy was never considered as an option. The same is true in most cases today. Instead of adapting diets to fit people's needs, they try to adapt people to the standard American diet.

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It's just that the few raw, zero-carbers I've come across tend to mention still having issues 2-3 years after doing zero-carb. Well we'll see how things turn out in 10 years time.
I wonder if some of them are eating dairy. I noticed that a number of the low Paleos, low carbers and rawists who don't cut out dairy continue to have problems but tend to deny any possibility of dairy being the source--even without having tried eliminating it for more than a month or so. I was a real dairy addict myself, so I'm not criticizing, and believe in "each to their own."

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Re doing zc:- I think it's very important to try out all the various kinds of diet first, whether raw vegan or zero-carb or whatever. So often as not, I've found that gurus from the various different disciplines all have something useful to say about a subject, and it's also true that no 1 guru(or human being, for that matter) is 100% infallible, so it pays to do as much experimentation on one's own as possible.
That's pretty much my view as well, though I try to be careful when experimenting that I don't do serious damage to myself.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #32 on: May 28, 2009, 06:27:07 pm »
What experiences did you have that made you distrust the organic label? Do you mostly buy locally grown or wild plant foods now?

Did you buy a "brix" meter and do you test the fruit/veggie juices yourself for sucrose (mineral) content? Or do you just judge by the taste (sweetness only?) How reliable are these tests since most hybrid plants are bred to have higher levels of sugars..? oh and meat can actually have a brix index? How do you even test that?

I haven't got round to actually buying a brix-meter as yet. I just go by taste, for now. You'd have to ask cherimoya_kid on this forum re more info re brix. AFAIK, it's only plants that can be tested(but one could test the plants the herbivores feed on and thus estimate the relative quality of the meats.

IMO, brix is more useful for those who either have a multitude of reasonably cheap, high-quality sources available or who own their own farms.

Re negative experiences re organic:- At the start of this diet, I would just arbitrarily buy my raw foods from any source that was organic/grassfed etc, often from large agricombines and the like(eg:- buying organic, free-range eggs from the supermarket). However, I then quickly got hold of cheaper sources of wild game such as wild hare carcasses etc., and found that the taste of the latter was far superior to any of the standard organic fare. I also had some other experiences where I found small-time farmers who couldn't afford to convert officially to organic status, and whose meat was way better than many of the bigger farms I visited. A good example is a very nice nonorganic "cavalheria" I know  in Italy which sells raw 100% grassfed horsemeat which, IMO, has a far better taste/nutrient-profile than any organic/grassfed meats I've ever had in the UK. Yet that horsemeat is only a quarter or a third of the price of organic/grassfed meats in the UK.


Re wild plant-foods:- Trouble is I live in a city and allotments are very difficult to come by. I do pick on wild fruit such as blackberries in Hampstead heath or wild samphire on Italian beaches and the like but I'm forced to buy organic fruit from either local market-stalls or supermarkets. I dislike buying organic blueberries from new zealand, say, but, unfortunately, I live in an overindustrialised  country which despises farming so there's not much local farming left.

Offline Nicola

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #33 on: June 03, 2009, 05:29:23 am »
Hi Tyler,

I am interested in this "Blue Ice" fermented cod liver oil. Can you get it in England or is it only possible to order it from America?

If so, I might have to try and find a way in the EU...

Nicola

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #34 on: June 03, 2009, 05:30:18 am »
Hi Tyler,

I am interested in this "Blue Ice" fermented cod liver oil. Can you get it in England or is it only possible to order it from America?

If so, I might have to try and find a way in the EU...

Nicola

I get it from a shop which has a website(something like red23.co.uk ?)

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #35 on: June 03, 2009, 05:31:00 am »
Today I had a truly massive amount of saltmarsh-fed lamb and a couple of pieces of watermelon.

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #36 on: June 03, 2009, 08:56:46 am »
Meat cannot (that I know of) be successfully brixed.  I have read Rex Harrill talk about it on the Brix yahoo group that he runs.  He says it's not realistic, but he says he has heard of people who claim to have done it.  I don't bother.  I believe in going by taste/texture/common sense/knowing your source when it comes to meat.

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2009, 07:51:58 am »
I get it from a shop which has a website(something like red23.co.uk ?)

Nicola,

    Elainie posted on GI2MR that she uses Blue Ice cod liver oil.  This is here profile here, to contact her. http://www.rawpaleoforum.com/?action=profile;u=234.  She's in the US though, so I don't know, Tyler's source might be more convenient to you.
"Genuine truth angers people in general because they don't know what to do with the energy generated by a glimpse of reality." Greg W. Goodwin

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #38 on: June 07, 2009, 10:54:45 pm »
Today I bought a large wad of raw beef suet(grassfed) as well as some raw quail eggs(far tastier than chicken- or duck- eggs). Also got some free-range turkey-breast fillets and plenty of  raw lamb(mutton being now out of season) some liver/kidney/heart(all lamb) and 2 wild hare carcasses. In a few weeks I'll be in Italy where I can finally spend time eating the delicious raw grassfed horsemeat over there.Oh, and got myself 20 extra-large oysters and 2 live crab and 1 live lobster to be frozen and eaten(I'm not scoffing all these foods in one, they should last me a couple of weeks).

*Cheated with a couple of bottles of sulphite-free cider. It's so unusual to find sulphite-free cider or wine that I thought I should take advantage at this time. Otherwise I avoid cider or wine completely.

Offline Nicola

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #39 on: June 12, 2009, 03:32:39 am »
Today I bought a large wad of raw beef suet(grassfed)

Tyler, what colour is your grassfed beef suet? The muscle fat I get is yellow but my suet seems to be white with a little red from the blood.

Nicola

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #40 on: June 12, 2009, 04:49:21 pm »
Tyler, what colour is your grassfed beef suet? The muscle fat I get is yellow but my suet seems to be white with a little red from the blood.

Nicola

It's pure white. I have only rarely had yellowish-white suet in the past. Lex and Gary seem to be of the opinion that one can only truly determine grassfed status of suet by rendering it and seeing if it turns yellow or not - haven't done so yet as I don't have the equipment.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #41 on: June 13, 2009, 05:38:49 pm »
2 anomalies:-

I've noticed how my irises have been lightening slowly over the years. The difference was quite noticeable in the first 3 years but then more or less stopped. Then, after taking those dr ron adrenal/thyroid supplements, it seems to have increased.

Re iris-colour change:- My irises were so dark as to be almost coal-black at the start of going for RAF diets. They improved slightly with raw meats being eaten, but quickly became worse when I included raw dairy in the diet. Now they're sort of a light green/grey/brown.

It's interesting as many RVAFers have reported a lightening of their irises after years of eating raw animal foods. Whites seem to get grey/green or blue eyes while nonwhites get amber-coloured eyes, last I checked.


Another anomaly:-  After I went rawpalaeo, I started noticing that my back would stiffen if I spent too much time in bed. That is, I'd have no problems if I slept 6-7 hours and got up as became awake, but if I ever try to do a lie-in after waking(even 15 minutes), then my back stiffens up and it becomes uncomfortable to stay in bed for longer. Now, the stiffness is easily got rid of via a hot bath for 5 minutes, but I'm curious re this as I didn't have it before. Now,sleeping in beds is hardly palaeo and it may be that as my muscles started to harden up after going for RVAF diets, that somehow this discomfort arose. I have no idea. But it is curious that I don't get the stiffness from sleeping just from staying awake but lying in bed after waking.

Offline Josh

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #42 on: June 14, 2009, 02:19:17 am »
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1119282

Dunno if you've seen this...I can't spend a whole night in them yet, but find them good for having a rest.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #43 on: June 14, 2009, 03:21:21 am »
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1119282

Dunno if you've seen this...I can't spend a whole night in them yet, but find them good for having a rest.

Interesting. I've always thought that pillows were a bad idea, but it's so difficult to kick the habit.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #44 on: June 14, 2009, 04:31:34 am »
Interesting. I've always thought that pillows were a bad idea, but it's so difficult to kick the habit.

I've been sleeping on the floor with a pillow at my new house. I can get comfy laying on my arms but eventually the circulation gets cut off so I don't like to do it.

Offline Nicola

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #45 on: June 15, 2009, 07:05:40 pm »
I never liked pillows - for years I have been sleeping on this

http://www.elsaint.com/_de/produktseiten/knackpunkt.html

and have had my atlas corrected

http://www.atlasprofilax.ch/eng/index.php

Nicola

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #46 on: June 17, 2009, 05:06:38 am »
http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1119282

Dunno if you've seen this...I can't spend a whole night in them yet, but find them good for having a rest.
Thanks much! I've been keeping my eyes open for biologically appropriate sleeping/sitting/etc. stuff for months and hadn't seen anything on sleeping/pillows yet.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #47 on: June 18, 2009, 05:40:17 pm »
It may be worth doing a sticky topic for palaeo lifestyles involving things like dealing with hygiene,  proper posture/sleeping position etc.


By the way, I think I ought to mention a quirk of mine:- I often, especially in summer, put my mineral-water bottles in the freezer, then take them out after they've completely frozen and start drinking once the ice starts melting. This is partly for taste reasons and because I've always noticed just how cold rivers/lakes are, even in summer in Europe, and because when I used to just put ice-cubes in my glasses of water during the Italian summer, I would invariably find that the ice-cubes melted too fast for my liking.

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #48 on: June 23, 2009, 05:12:18 pm »
May have forgotten to mention other things I do:-

1) I often carry a magnet hanging from my neck. I think I get some slight effect from it but it's probably just placebo. My view is that magnets don't do any harm even if they may or may not do me some good.

2) I've been experimenting off and on with the Bates Method and have experienced only very minor but definite results(what Bates Teachers call "flashes")

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Re: A day in the life of TylerDurden
« Reply #49 on: June 23, 2009, 08:27:14 pm »
May have forgotten to mention other things I do:-

1) I often carry a magnet hanging from my neck. I think I get some slight effect from it but it's probably just placebo. My view is that magnets don't do any harm even if they may or may not do me some good.

Much experience with specially made therapeutic magnets confirms the claim of the seller that it tends to alkalize the blood.
I use my neodymium magnet for those bug bites that won't stop itching - all biological poisons are acidic; it neutralizes in 30 minutes.

William

 

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