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Offline yuli

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duck fat
« on: September 24, 2010, 11:25:37 am »
I know its not raw, but I just bought a tub of pure duck fat and it sooo goood.
Better that butter! Eggs gently fried sunny side up in lots of duck fat, of the very little cooked food i ever eat this has to be the best one.

Offline ezekiel

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2010, 11:31:11 am »
Rendered fat eh?

 So, duck have fat, that isn't just skin? Or is that their fat. I would eat more chicken, if the skins weren't dipped in hot water/or wax to help remove the feathers.

Offline yuli

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2010, 11:38:54 am »
yeah its just rendered duck fat...
it's less solid then butter, it melts at very low temperatures, looks like a creamy coconut oil, tastes really really good though, I wonder if pemmican can be made with this? Probably not as its too creamy.
I also bought some lamb bones full of very creamy marrow, that I will eat raw  ;D

Offline pioneer

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2010, 11:41:47 am »
We must have different taste buds because I just had duck the other week, the fat was nasty -v. Worst fat I ever had. I like beef suet ten times better. Both the taste and texture I hated. Beef suet kind of crumbles and I like that, it is not as slimy too.
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Offline yuli

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #4 on: September 24, 2010, 11:59:34 am »
I like marrow which can be crumbly, plain butter, the thick hard fat on fatty steaks, duck fat, olive oil, coconut oil, sesame oil and even avocados and the fatty macadamia nuts...but I never had suet yet...I like all kinds of fat so I am sure I'll like that too...
But most of all I like the fat thats in salmon and fish!

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #5 on: September 24, 2010, 12:08:37 pm »
The first few times I tried cooked fatty duck meat I hated it. It tasted greasy. But then I tried a high-quality duck breast in my local healthfood market and it was excellent, both raw and cooked. The fat is very tender and tasty and melts in my mouth, but if I let it sit out and get warm and start to deteriorate, it gets rubbery and gross pretty fast. I think the fat breaks down easily, similar to sardines, mackerel and other fatty fish (which ducks eat, I believe). So I tend to eat duck within a day or two of buying it.

Smoked duck breast gives me a little nausea for some reason, even though other smoked meats don't. Even more strangely, duck "bacon", which is sliced, smoked duck breast, doesn't give me nausea, but it's a different brand, so I think the farm that sells the smoked breasts is doing something different to them. Duck bacon is the only bacon I can eat without heating it beyond what the producers of it do. Best tasting bacon I've ever had. I found that the key to eating duck fat is to cut it into thin chunks so it's easy to chew and swallow.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
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Offline yuli

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2010, 12:11:42 pm »
It is not as slimy too.

This duck fat wasn't slimy, it was oily...raw egg yolks are slimy. It's like the in between of oil and saturated hard animal fat...But it doesn't make me feel sick at all, makes me feel full.

I think if I ate eggs sunny side up everyday in duck fat maybe I would start to feel sick...its a once in a while thing.

Offline ezekiel

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2010, 12:14:14 pm »
This duck fat wasn't slimy, it was oily...raw egg yolks are slimy. It's like the in between of oil and saturated hard animal fat...But it doesn't make me feel sick at all, makes me feel full.
they are talking about raw i think, rendered fat is much different that raw fat in texture

Offline Hannibal

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2010, 01:30:57 pm »
There is mainly subcutaneous yellow soft fat in the duck. It's tasty.
Do you blame vultures for the carcass they eat?
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Offline TylerDurden

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2010, 05:01:17 pm »
Cooked animal fat is about the worst kind of food for me to eat. The taste is repellent, it makes me far more nauseous than any other kind of cooked food, with a hangover-like effect occurring afterwards.
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Offline ForTheHunt

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #10 on: September 24, 2010, 10:05:18 pm »
Cooked animal fat is about the worst kind of food for me to eat. The taste is repellent, it makes me far more nauseous than any other kind of cooked food, with a hangover-like effect occurring afterwards.

For me it taste fucking aaaaaawesome. Quite addictive actually. But yeah, afterwards I'll be nauseus as hell.
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Offline Arthas_

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2010, 10:18:00 pm »
For me it taste fucking aaaaaawesome. Quite addictive actually. But yeah, afterwards I'll be nauseus as hell.

Same here. Though I'll be fine after eating it.

Offline yuli

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2010, 01:21:16 am »
Cooked animal fat is about the worst kind of food for me to eat. The taste is repellent, it makes me far more nauseous than any other kind of cooked food, with a hangover-like effect occurring afterwards.

Oh ok, I don't seem to have so much sensitivity to cooked fat, I don't like eating cooked meat and it makes my digestion worse, it is very hard to digest and the more cooked the worse, so I know I am sensitive to cooked meat, but cooked fat does not...I wonder why...
The worst thing for me was the grains, I would eat pasteurized cheese (with added bacteria) and cooked fat over any kind of grains any day.
But I do try keep my amount or RAW fat higher then the intake of cooked fat (if that makes a diff)!
The last time I made Chocolate butter, melted non-raw butter, mixed with cocoa and honey, and then solidified it again.
I ate a quarter of the large block of the thing of butter, lol, by itself with nothing else except the cocoa in it, didn't have an issue.
Mind you I don't eat cooked fat every day maybe if I did I would feel sick. I only have it like 2-3 times a week now.

Offline RomanK

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2010, 09:31:11 am »
Practically the same experience: rendered duck fat tastes really god, did not eat too much to check result but it is kind of replacement for butter (which is not raw in Canada and I avoid it in any case for personal reason).

Offline Hannibal

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2010, 01:23:49 pm »
IMO cooked fat is far more unpleasant (re taste and smell) than raw one.
Once I melted the palatable raw fat and it became a "SOB" ;)
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Offline ouinon

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2010, 10:33:42 pm »
I eat quite a lot of duck, especially the breast, it's yummy, and it's true that it has a really thick layer of fat on one side. I cook it very fast and hot along the fatty side, until the outer surface is crispy and brown, and then give the "meat" side a very swift brown too. It's very pink to red on the inside, and the fat is a delicious mixture of crispy chewy and white creamy-buttery texture, where still raw.

There's always a lot of fat in the pan afterwards, and I save that but actually don't like it very much with anything so I've got three bowls of it in my fridge :lol I've tried eggs with it but not only am I beginning to go off eggs, ( I never liked the whites very much anyway ), but I really don't like the taste of them in duck fat. I think duck fat tastes loads better raw ( with a crispy edge! :lol ) than rendered unfortunately.

Not sure what I'm going to use the rendered fat for now that I have almost totally stopped eating vegetable soups and potato. Suggestions would be very welcome, :) because I'm reluctant to just throw it away. :(

Edit. PS. It's definitely an incentive to reduce the cooking time even more though, so as to eat more of the fat in its highly edible raw form.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2010, 10:37:06 pm »
Welcome Ouinon. FYI: be careful how much you talk about cooking in this forum, and maybe add caveats when you do (such as "I'm not advocating cooking" or "I do it for taste reasons" and so on), because cooking is very frowned upon here, especially by Tyler, you'll find.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline ouinon

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2010, 10:56:24 pm »
Welcome Ouinon. FYI: be careful how much you talk about cooking in this forum, and maybe add caveats when you do (such as "I'm not advocating cooking" or "I do it for taste reasons" and so on), because cooking is very frowned upon here, especially by Tyler, you'll find.
Hi! :D Ok, right, thanks.

To put record straight immediately then; :) I am really enthusiastic about raw and pre-neolithic foods, and I'm actively/consciously weaning myself off cooking meat. I have eaten meat increasingly pink, red, rare, and blue over the last year or so, such that even the french papa of my son is somewhat astonished sometimes by how red/blue the meat is, and I am finding meat cooked the normal/"à point" way less and less enjoyable or interesting.

I'm still fond of/attached to a bit of "browned" and "crispy" texture, etc, though. But I eat very little cooked anymore now apart from the browned surface of meat, ( except when I succumb to starchy carbos and/or a sugar binge but that is becoming infrequent ). I already eat almost all of my food raw it's just taking me a little longer with the meat. Duck is actually a good "tool" for me precisely because the fat already tastes so good to me RAW! :)

Advice noted, thanks. I will refrain from references to what remains of my "post-neolithic habit". :D Sorry about that.
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« Last Edit: October 16, 2010, 11:07:20 pm by ouinon »

Offline yuli

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2010, 02:54:56 am »
Welcome Ouinon. FYI: be careful how much you talk about cooking in this forum, and maybe add caveats when you do (such as "I'm not advocating cooking" or "I do it for taste reasons" and so on), because cooking is very frowned upon here, especially by Tyler, you'll find.

Well this is in Hot Topics forum which states in its description that discussion of non-RAF is allowed on this part of the forum.
Secondly, not everyone wanting to eat more raw can just switch to 100% not cooking their meat overnight. The fact that someone is not eating raw but starting posting in the forum obviously means they are interested in transitioning to the diet, I thought this is what Hot Topics forum is for, are we supposed to tell them to lie about what they ate, or hide things and censor them, how can we then give them proper advice then, obviously why he cooked it is because thats how he is used to it. I think if he was advocating it, the post would have a much different, obvious tone. I don't see from the post why he has to add the words, "I am not advocating...", because he is not, all he is doing is stating how he eats duck in Hot Topics, in a post about rendered duck fat as well, I don't see what's wrong with that?

For those people that still can't handle all their meat raw its good to learn how to cook less or in a less harmful way.
For example broiling meats in the oven, frying till their outside is crispy, doing them well done on BBQ are all methods of cooking which produce a very high level of AGE's.
But slowly simmering meats in water, steaming them, only cooking the outsides to leave the middle raw, those are all ways of cooking that produce lesser amount harmful AGE's.
Its not like cooking is black and white process and the second you show a chicken leg to a cooking pan it turns into 100% poison, its a gradual process, so cooking less is not as good as raw, but not as bad as constant overcooking.

I am about 95% raw, the other 5% I eat cooked is rare times when I cook my meat (never cook non-meat sources), during the 5% when I cook my meat its cooked very lightly. For example Ontario chicken is something I will absolutely not eat raw, but once in a blue moon I want chicken, so I will take some chicken legs and simmer them lightly in water, I can then drink the resulting broth and eat the chicken. I also am starting to like my raw meat more aged these days - so the fact that I am adding tiny amounts off cooked meat once a week is NOT impeding my raw meat journey, so why should we not talk about it, its all about the journey...

I'm still fond of/attached to a bit of "browned" and "crispy" texture, etc, though. But I eat very little cooked anymore now apart from the browned surface of meat...

I find a good way to eat red meat crispy and 100% raw is to cut it into smaller chunks and leave it in open air in the fridge or hang it to let it air dry and it gets harder texture on the outside. After doing that I like it better then fresh meat. With raw fish though I like it fresh raw. Try aging it you may like it better that way raw. Sometimes I just leave it in my room over night and the whole day without the fridge after already leaving it to age in the fridge and it gets more aged faster that way, eating this kind of meat never caused me any stomach issues so far.

On another note... I have read in numerous places that early humans also scavenged a lot, which would make sense as to why most people like their raw meat at least somewhat aged and get good effects from it.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2010, 03:05:21 am »
Well this is in Hot Topics forum which states in its description that discussion of non-RAF is allowed on this part of the forum.
Secondly, not everyone wanting to eat more raw can just switch to 100% not cooking their meat overnight. ....
Yeah, I know, you don't have to convince me. I don't care what she eats, I just know that Tyler has low tolerance for talk about cooking and even low-heat rendering and Ouinon was quickly banned at another forum due to a misunderstanding and I don't want to see her get quickly banned again from not understanding the sensitivities of the forum.

Quote
On another note... I have read in numerous places that early humans also scavenged a lot, which would make sense as to why most people like their raw meat at least somewhat aged and get good effects from it.

Yeah, and they likely didn't always eat their meat in a single meal and there was no refrigeration, so it aged that way too.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2010, 03:06:39 am »
I do not see a problem re mentioning cooking in Hot Topics as some people want to transition slowly or want to know what is least worse re cooking when among SAD-eaters etc.

I suppose there might be cause for concern if endless multiple threads openly advocating cooking appeared, but most people are sensible re this sort of thing. Only 1 or 2 people like William have gone over the top.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
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Offline ouinon

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2010, 04:19:07 am »
Quote from: yuli
I find a good way to eat red meat crispy and 100% raw is to cut it into smaller chunks and leave it in open air in the fridge or hang it to let it air dry and it gets harder texture on the outside. After doing that I like it better then fresh meat. With raw fish though I like it fresh raw. Try aging it you may like it better that way raw. Sometimes I just leave it in my room over night and the whole day without the fridge after already leaving it to age in the fridge and it gets more aged faster that way, eating this kind of meat never caused me any stomach issues so far.

Thank you very much for that suggestion; it sounds good, interesting. I won't try it with the supermarket meat, ( yet, anyway ), but with the fresher and grass-fed stuff from the little local specialist butcher. I wonder what my 11 year old son will think of it; so far he has liked meat more and more the redder/more raw it is! :lol

Quote from: PaleoPhil
Quote from: yuli
On another note... I have read in numerous places that early humans also scavenged a lot, which would make sense as to why most people like their raw meat at least somewhat aged and get good effects from it.
Yeah, and they likely didn't always eat their meat in a single meal and there was no refrigeration, so it aged that way too.

That sounds logical, and suggests that as you say we are probably very adapted to aged meat. I would never have dreamed of treating or "preparing" meat to eat this way, "fear of microbes and such", before now!!! But put this way it sounds plausible, even attractive. And I've been amazed over the last couple of years of eating things beyond sell-by-dates and left out on plates etc ( all relatively unprocessed foods ) how well I've been, how rarely ill from gastros etc. So, hmm. I'll have a go this week. Thanks! :)

And, slightly more on topic, :lol I'm definitely going to reduce the amount of time I heat my duck. The raw fat is just too good to waste by rendering, :) ( since even if the rendered stuff is a pretty good substitute for veg oil or butter in stews/soups or cooked veg I'm not eating those things anymore ).
« Last Edit: October 17, 2010, 04:24:18 am by ouinon »

Offline yuli

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2010, 08:15:52 am »
Thank you very much for that suggestion; it sounds good, interesting. I won't try it with the supermarket meat, ( yet, anyway ), but with the fresher and grass-fed stuff from the little local specialist butcher....
That sounds logical, and suggests that as you say we are probably very adapted to aged meat. I would never have dreamed of treating or "preparing" meat to eat this way, "fear of microbes and such", before now!!!

I still sometimes eat supermarket meat, not the prepackaged one but from the butchers area in a quality supermarket. Most of my meat however is grass-fed. I have not noticed any problems with digestion of either, however I usually get the grass-fed not only because its healthier but it actually tastes better raw too. We must be adapted to the aged meat because I digest it even better then fresh one, and have a nice, calm energy after.
When I started raw meat diet I was also paranoid of parasites, ate my meat always fresh etc...once you get used to it, you will no longer worry about parasites, don't force yourself to eat it if you're not sure, but slowly and surely you will loose the fear of parasites and bacteria, I know my meat is getting more bacteria on it when I leave it all day in my room, and somehow my digestion is only improving from it. One thing is I always eat my meat alone, if I eat any veggies, fruits, nuts now its always part of a different meal altogether. One thing I can combine with the meat is aged, fatty, raw cheese (this is NOT paleo though,warning, AHEM!  :P ) and that never gives me problems, the amount of raw hard cheese I consume at any given time is very small though, like 2 small cubes.

Today I got my own mini-fridge just for my meats so I can actually leave them out uncovered in the fridge or hang them on hooks (I also didn't want the smell of my family's cooked foods in the fridge to penetrate my precious aging meats as I have sensitive smell), I can't wait to see and taste the results!

I bought some pastured lamb chops & ground bison and placed it on the racks in the fridge, no need to cover it (unless you're trying to go for wet aged high-meat)...I think I am gonna wait until I am enjoying extremely old meats before I go for making any high meat though. Some of the meats I had were left on plates and got crispy on the top then pretty slimy and wet on the bottom, I ate a pound of meat like that and did feel nice and euphoric, perhaps even meat that is slightly high has some benefit over the super fresh one, again - I think its a gradient-type situation with highness of the meat, not black and white (high/not high).

Offline drewpalermo

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Re: duck fat
« Reply #23 on: April 12, 2016, 09:45:07 pm »
I've gotten my duck fat several times from US Wellness Meats: grasslandbeef.com?affId=188960

Excellent tasting stuff if you've never tried it before, rivals butter for sure.  They get their duck from Hudson Valley, sold in 1.75 lb tubs.  Just make sure you meet their $75 minimum, which isn't too hard considering all the different cuts of grass fed beef/lamb, rabbit, duck, etc you have to choose from.  They even will ship out fresh meat (never frozen)!

 

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