Author Topic: 2 questions  (Read 1999 times)

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Offline achillezzz

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2 questions
« on: January 09, 2011, 07:43:43 pm »
What you think of self made almond butter(dried not soaked so I added water to the blender).
Me and my friends are doing some now.

And the most Important question can I eat beef shank raw(not grassfed  :'( )? the meat from legs? its very deep red in color.

Yesterday me and my friends we had lamb leg cooked of course I didn't even want to mention them that I wana try it raw they would think I'm psycho.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: 2 questions
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2011, 08:46:33 pm »
Almond butter is too processed to be genuinely palaeo, IMO. Avoid.


One of the first things newbies often state when they start the diet is that they are unable to find any grassfed raw meats or cannot afford grassfed/organic meats etc. In actual fact, they usually always find that, as long as they are prepared to do a huge amount of tedious searching online(and off-line at farmers' markets, local farms etc.), they invariably eventually discover new sources of decent, high quality raw animal foods. Some may have no access to grassfed meats but live off cheaper, raw wildcaught seafood as they live in coastal areas, others may find a few sources of cheaper raw wild game but no grassfed meats(in which case they are actually better off re diet, anyway!) - a few  others may have absolutely no issues with raw dairy and use that and raw eggs and raw seafood as  staples instead of raw grassfed meats.

That said, a few people do end up without any decent sources due to their own particular circumstances. I have heard, occasionally, of people even regaining their health on raw, grainfed meats(presumably simply because they were no longer consuming any heat-created toxins any more, despite the lack of nutrition in grainfed meats). Of course, it all depends on how intensively-farmed the beef is. For example, if the cattle were fed on 100 percent grainfed diets with soy all year round, given hormones etc., then it's a sure bet, IMO, that such meat is (mostly) useless. However, this seems more of an American habit; in Europe, I've been told that it is far more common to feed their cattle on partial grain diets, along with some grass, which is much healthier. Some farmers even only feed their cattle on grains in the winter and up to Easter.

You might also consider trying meats from animals which are far more likely to be fed on grass, such as raw lamb or raw mutton.
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Offline turkish

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Re: 2 questions
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2011, 06:21:58 am »
What you think of self made almond butter(dried not soaked so I added water to the blender).
Me and my friends are doing some now.

And the most Important question can I eat beef shank raw(not grassfed  :'( )? the meat from legs? its very deep red in color.

Yesterday me and my friends we had lamb leg cooked of course I didn't even want to mention them that I wana try it raw they would think I'm psycho.

Dont eat too much almond or at least dont do it often.

Offline donrad

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Re: 2 questions
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2011, 12:33:15 am »
I like all raw nuts & think they are a great paleo food in moderation, don't see why almond butter eaten fresh would be bad.

Lamb is normally prepared rare. Eat the rarest part next to the bone. Your friends will think you are a gourmet. Also try carving very thin slices off before cooking. Add a little salt & pepper and eat on a cracker. This is called hourdourves by the french. The same with beef. Or goat. Or whatever.
 
Tell your friends it is a family tradition that goes back many generations. It is and does. Thousands of generations actually.
Naturally, Don

 

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