Author Topic: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago  (Read 5081 times)

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Offline PaleoPhil

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Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« on: March 16, 2011, 05:06:02 am »
Tyler should love this.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/science/15obfire.html?_r=1
"a new study argues that humans did not master fire until about 400,000 years ago" [instead of the 1.8-1.9 million years ago that Wrangham claims]

Wrangham's weak response: “It demands some serious thinking about how early Homo could have survived on a seasonally variable food supply despite having small teeth and small guts"

He should test a diet that includes raw meat/fat/organs/fish/shellfish/insects instead of relying on data from near-vegan raw diets.

I find that most who assume that Wrangham must be right that then actually read/hear his claims and "evidence" are horrified by the weak case and political agendas.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2011, 08:07:34 am by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline MoonStalkeR

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2011, 06:07:10 am »
Even if fire was discovered long ago, the original use would likely be limited to basic functions including warmth, light, and weaponry. It could have taken many generations before they decided to use such a destructive resource on nourishment, starting only with plants/vegetables that weren't edible raw.

Offline Sitting Coyote

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2011, 07:46:07 am »
The original article in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science is open access, and can be seen here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2011/03/07/1018116108.full.pdf+html?sid=7fac4f73-c9aa-4fee-bee7-30b65ebec195

Offline goodsamaritan

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2011, 08:29:56 am »
I like my meat and fat refrigerator cold.
Does that mean anything?
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2011, 08:32:20 am »
I like meatsicles!  ;D
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline kurite

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2011, 08:56:16 am »
Even if fire was discovered well before meat eating it doesn't mean we cooked with it and obviously raw paleo is much more beneficial in terms of health than regular paleo so we obviously aren't meant to cook our food. Even if we do receive benefits from cooking such as making some inedible raw foods, into edible foods once again it doesn't mean we should be eating all cooked foods. Are there people who still think its actually healthier to cook all of their food?
"A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have."

Offline Sitting Coyote

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2011, 11:08:45 am »
There are people who think it is healthier--and perhaps more 'civilized'--to cook all of their food.  I doubt those who read this thread are among that crowd, though.

Offline Löwenherz

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2011, 03:04:55 pm »
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/science/15obfire.html?_r=1
"a new study argues that humans did not master fire until about 400,000 years ago" [instead of the 1.8-1.9 million years ago that Wrangham claims]

400.000 years? That's still quite a long time, isn't it?

400.000 div 20 = 20.000 generations

Anyway, it's more or less all speculation. The only thing for sure is that we know nothing.

Löwenherz

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Humans’ First Use of Fire May Not Be So Long Ago
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2011, 08:36:56 pm »
400.000 years? That's still quite a long time, isn't it? ....
Sure, but the key dates are around 2.3 million years ago and 1.5-1.9 mya, because that is when substantial morphological changes including brains size increase occur in the remains of hominins (australopithecus and homo erectus, IIRC). Wrangham's cooking hypothesis is supposed to explain the latter change. Does anyone know what Wrangham's explanation for the brain increase ca 2.3 mya is?
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

 

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