Author Topic: Braaaaains  (Read 22219 times)

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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #25 on: April 27, 2011, 06:09:40 am »
The sale of brains has not been banned in the USA, AFAIK. A lot of places stopped selling them because customers stopped buying and probably also because sellers were afraid of getting sued if anyone got sick. Some places still sell them, and they're starting to make a come-back, especially in Hispanic communities, as people start to relax again. I think there was an article on this in one of the major American news periodicals. I've seen a lot of claims of a federal US law against selling brains, but haven't seen any actual specific law cited as evidence.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #26 on: July 31, 2011, 09:27:36 pm »
I asked my butcher about brains. He says that beef brains were banned because of mad-cow disease. Is this true? (I'm in California.) He's asking his supplier about getting lamb brains.
I found the law on it. Brains are only banned from "cattle 30 months of age or older":

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy - "Mad Cow Disease"
http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/bovine_spongiform_encephalopathy_mad_cow_disease/index.asp#7

"Specified Risk Material - FSIS declared that skull, brain, trigeminal ganglia, eyes, vertebral column, spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia of cattle 30 months of age or older and the small intestine of all cattle are specified risk materials that are prohibited in the human food supply. Tonsils from all cattle are also not allowed in the human food supply."

There was never a total ban on the sale of cow brains in the USA that I've seen.

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Cow brains still on menus
MAD-COW CONCERNS FAIL TO STOP SALES OF POTENTIALLY TOXIC MEXICAN DISH
BY ROBIN EVANS and CRYSTAL CARREON
San Jose Mercury News | Page 1A | July 2, 2004
http://www.rcevans.me/cowbrains.html
Brains, a part of cattle most likely to carry "mad cow" disease, remain a staple at many restaurants in the South Bay, particularly those offering tradi-tional Mexican cuisine.

...despite all the publicity, none of Laura Lopez's customers has questioned the safety of sesos. The manager of El Grullense on Berryessa Road, Lopez said she sells a lot of sesos, which are served in tacos, taquitos and quesadillas.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has not recalled cow brains from retail markets or restaurants. But it did announce Wednesday that it will ban for human consumption brains harvested from older cows, in which the disease has had time to incubate.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2011, 09:36:50 pm by PaleoPhil »
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline eveheart

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #27 on: July 31, 2011, 10:39:45 pm »
Thanks for the information, Phil. Also, thanks for directing me to this thread.
"I intend to live forever; so far, so good." -Steven Wright, comedian

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #28 on: August 01, 2011, 12:47:57 pm »
Didn't someone tell me that Lex ate Slanker's pet food? In that section it says that they some times just grind up the whole cow! - which would include the brain and all the organs. That makes me wonder about the bones, the skin, fur etc. A dog can digest bone, we're not supposed to be able to - no? Can we eat skin? Some things I would think would be ok for dogs that are not ok for us. What could the dog eat that we shouldn't? Are there human limits as to parts we would be better off avoiding?

If you tell someone that you are giving it to your dog or will use it for tanning, would they handle the animal or animal part in a way that might not be good for a human that would be fine for a dog or make it only useful for tanning and not consumption by anything? Dogs have elements in their saliva that kill parasites - we don't. I mean - we can't bury a bone in the backyard and dig it up months later and eat the decaying meat off of it and be ok - can we?

The easiest way I to get every part of a grass-fed animal does seem like it would be to order pet food from slankers - but it is frozen - AND it is for pets so ........ aren't there concerns?

I'm new - so please forgive me if this has all been talked about previously. I'm just about to do an order from Slankers and start my dogs on their pet foods. Are there reasons for me not to put a spoon and take a taste? Aren't there dangers telling someone that the food is for a dog when it isn't?

Offline KD

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #29 on: August 01, 2011, 01:42:39 pm »
You could probably ask lex his opinion but based on eating alot of this stuff and still being somewhat sketched by it..I wouldn't recommend it to people getting started on the diet. It doesn't have the whole animal anyway and is minus brain. Its just fatty meat ground with spleen, heart, liver and perhaps tongue or one or two other things..sweetbreads..?

for the reasons you listed and others its more dodgy than regular (esp unfrozen meats) except unfrozen have the possibility of more living critters if that is ones concern. Some will say these are mostly benign to humans..or even absent in domestic red meats so generally unfrozen when available is often seen as safer by some based on bacteria stuff as well as the theories of freezing damaging food.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #30 on: August 01, 2011, 07:31:39 pm »
Didn't someone tell me that Lex ate Slanker's pet food? In that section it says that they some times just grind up the whole cow!
Indeed, it does say "Sometimes we even grind up whole cows!"

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A dog can digest bone, we're not supposed to be able to - no? Can we eat skin? Some things I would think would be ok for dogs that are not ok for us.
Traditional peoples eat small bones and bone broths, but not large bones. Both pets and humans can eat whole cows if they're ground up, obviously, but that wouldn't normally happen in nature.

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What could the dog eat that we shouldn't?
Large bones and tough hides. Even dogs don't eat hooves or skulls and normally gnaw on the big bones rather than eat them completely. Hyenas, big cats and I think wolves can eat much of the large bones too, apparently, but not the skulls or hooves.

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If you tell someone that you are giving it to your dog or will use it for tanning, would they handle the animal or animal part in a way that might not be good for a human that would be fine for a dog or make it only useful for tanning and not consumption by anything?
There are lower standards for pet food than for human food. Lex has written about it in his journal.

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Dogs have elements in their saliva that kill parasites - we don't. I mean - we can't bury a bone in the backyard and dig it up months later and eat the decaying meat off of it and be ok - can we?
Sure we can (except maybe not if seriously immune compromised). Do a search on "high meat" here. There's too much for me to explain it all, but there are plenty of posts on it here, including a thread by Tyler in the newbie section.

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The easiest way I to get every part of a grass-fed animal does seem like it would be to order pet food from slankers - but it is frozen - AND it is for pets so ........ aren't there concerns?
Lex reported that they have a new mix made especially for squeamish humans like you--so no worries.

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I'm new - so please forgive me if this has all been talked about previously.
It has been. Most newbies are fearful about raw meats and high meats at first and ask a lot of the same questions until they eventually get over their fears.

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I'm just about to do an order from Slankers and start my dogs on their pet foods. Are there reasons for me not to put a spoon and take a taste?
Not serious ones really, Lex Rooker has been doing it for years. I highly recommend reading his journal. I thought I had already, but if I forgot to, then I'm sorry.

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Aren't there dangers telling someone that the food is for a dog when it isn't?
Slankers doesn't market or recommend their pet food to people. The people like Lex decide themselves, entirely on their own, to eat it. Slankers now has a human mix, so it's a moot question anyway.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #31 on: August 02, 2011, 06:27:54 am »
Thanks Phil. I have been making my way through Lex's journal but it is very long and some of it is quite confusing without a basic foundation.

Yes, I read Tyler's info on high meats and have read about them before, but if I remember right you keep them in the fridge or at least stir them - you don't exactly bury them in the backyard. lol. High meats also are not for newbies it seems - even newbie doggies.

I didn't see anything about that new mix on the Slankers website yesterday. I've been trying to read my way all the way through that too. I'll look more and then ask them before ordering.

My eyes are getting a bit blurry these days - so much to read!

So - if you get a ground up mix with more bones than a human would naturally eat - it would seem that it might be too much calcium - no?

I know dogs that chew on hooves. They sell them dried out in the pet stores for them actually. They really, really stink though once a dog starts on them. Pew.

I have totally gotten over the bacteria fear when it comes to eggs and dairy through slow education. How I did that partly though was through knowing my sources well and having confidence in them. That's the challenge with the meat. Frozen seems to take away any concerns regarding parasites, but needing to regenerate actual body tissue, I wonder about AV's comments on how frozen meats do not help with cellular regeneration and all the other jazz he says.

KD and Phil - what is your feeling on freezing vs. fresh meats both in terms of your own experience and your intellectual opinion on the "rumors" about frozen meat being so inferior?

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #32 on: August 02, 2011, 06:52:10 am »
Oh - and Phil - what I meant by asking if it could be dangerous telling someone that the food is for a dog when it isn't ... referred to the brains discussion. I meant is it really safe to go to butcher for instance and tell them that you want the brains for your dog when you are going to be eating it yourself? I know that Slankers does not market their dog food for human consumption and people have decided to eat it anyway. I don't think I would tell my egg or milk vendors that I was going to only feed it to animals because I think they might handle the food in ways that I might not be comfortable with if I did that. I'd rather tell them what I will be really use it for and risk not getting the food. If it's just for a dog they might take the stuff that was say put out in the shed with paint cans or who knows what? Maybe I'm just still too much of newbie and overly concerned about such things.

I better go back and get through Lex's entire journal. I could barely get through the first posts of his medical lab reports and all his percentages of this and that though. Sigh. I wish he had a summary of his health history and progress. I'll suck it up and stick it out - if for nothing else to be able to come back to you Phil and say, "Did it!".  :D

Offline RawZi

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #33 on: August 02, 2011, 09:01:11 am »
feeling on freezing vs. fresh meats both in terms of your own experience and your intellectual opinion on the "rumors" about frozen meat being so inferior

    If my flesh freezes, it gets numb, it feels burnt, it stings etc.  Frozen meat tends to feel a little gushier, yuck.  Test it out.  Make high meat from fresh and frozen.  Look at it.  Test it on your dogs.  Dogs would love high meat anyway.  The local cats here like it.
"Genuine truth angers people in general because they don't know what to do with the energy generated by a glimpse of reality." Greg W. Goodwin

Offline eveheart

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #34 on: August 02, 2011, 09:25:32 am »
I don't think I would tell my egg or milk vendors that I was going to only feed it to animals because I think they might handle the food in ways that I might not be comfortable with if I did that.

The goat-share lady in my area had shareholders sign statements that say that we are going to use the raw milk for animal consumption only!

Sometimes you have to do business in a <wink, wink> manner to get around stupid laws.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #35 on: August 02, 2011, 10:55:51 am »
Thanks Phil. I have been making my way through Lex's journal but it is very long and some of it is quite confusing without a basic foundation.
There are at least three basic threads I noticed in Lex's journal:

1) The way of the skeptical epistemocrat: Nassim Taleb defines an epistemocrat as ”someone of epistemic humility, who holds his own knowledge in greatest suspicion.” Due to following wayward paths in the past, Lex has learned epistemic humility. He puts ideas to the test and is slow to draw conclusions. He tries to avoid making assumptions or relying uncritically on the claims of gurus or "what everyone knows" and he recommends that others do the same rather than make a guru out of him.
2) The way of the emipiricist: Lex started the journal as a way of testing Gary Taubes' hypothesis that it is essentially impossible to become obese on a low-carb diet by eating an all-meat (including organs and animal fat) diet. Many low carbers treat Gary like a god whose rules cannot be questioned, but Lex instead put Gary's claim to the test and the results brought Gary's claim into question, at least in Lex's case. Lex also found that the all-meat diet worked well for him, so he stuck with it.
3) The way of the red path (simplicity and antifragility): Lex prefers simplicity, which his all-meat diet fits nicely with. Adding complexity, particularly unnecessary complexity, obscures one's view and increases hidden risk.

If what Lex or Nassim write doesn't make sense, then I recommend reading it again and again until it does. If it still doesn't, then I recommend asking them questions.

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Yes, I read Tyler's info on high meats and have read about them before, but if I remember right you keep them in the fridge or at least stir them - you don't exactly bury them in the backyard. lol.
Believe it or not, traditional peoples actually do that, though they tend to use methods that are a bit more sophisticated than just dropping meat in holes and covering them with dirt. They tend to first seal the meat in the hide of the animal and bury it a bit more loosely in a hole covered with rocks, sometimes lined with grass. The rocks are mainly to protect the caches from other animals (which is also a reason that dogs bury bones--and there is evidence that dogs also bury bones to improve them, as they do it even when they have plenty of food--in other words, dogs may consciously make the bones and meaty scraps more edible). Bear in mind that the Arctic earth is a lot cooler than that of most of the world, so a refrigerator is probably a closer emulation than the ground in most areas.

Here's a past excerpt of mine on the subject of high meat:

http://www.rawpaleodietforum.com/journals/a-day-in-the-life-of-tylerdurden/msg72756/#msg72756
The traditional Inuit ... put the meat in the hide of the animal (I wonder if the hide allows a small amount of oxygen in through the hide?) and tied it with the animal's tendons or something and then buried it either under rocks (just so other animals couldn't get it I think?), or in a grass-lined hole covered with loose dirt.

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High meats also are not for newbies it seems - even newbie doggies.
I agree. I don't know why some newbies jump right into making inept versions of high meat instead of trying out raw meat for a while and learning more about how to make and store high meat properly. We had one fellow do that recently. He paid no attention to the instructions about high meat, claimed he got sick from his so-called "high meat" that he left out on a warm day, blamed it on raw meat in general and gave up on the raw Paleo approach after just a few days. No surprise there.

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I didn't see anything about that new mix on the Slankers website yesterday. I've been trying to read my way all the way through that too. I'll look more and then ask them before ordering.
You could ask Lex or Slankers themselves.

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So - if you get a ground up mix with more bones than a human would naturally eat - it would seem that it might be too much calcium - no?
Probably so. I imagine it could be particularly problematic for people who already have high levels of calcium and those prone to constipation.

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I have totally gotten over the bacteria fear when it comes to eggs and dairy through slow education.
I do recommend eating probiotic foods (which you do anyway) and having a plan in place if you do overdose on pathogenic bacteria. Better safe than sorry. I'm thinking of keeping an emetic on hand, such as anantmul (ipecac, sarsparilla) powder. I had bad nausea once (I'm not sure if it was due to some miso soup I ate or old fermented CLO I took that I had left out of the fridge or a combination) and found that clay and ginger tea and raw honey didn't help any and I didn't feel better until I vomited what I ate back out (and then I was fine), so I'm thinking that if I get bad nausea again I'll just make myself vomit to get it over with, rather than have to feel bad for hours. I'm thinking I would also drink fluid before taking the emetic, to make the flow easier and avoid choking. Of course, this probably wouldn't be a good plan for someone prone to bulimia, but that has never been anything close to an issue for me.

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I wonder about AV's comments on how frozen meats do not help with cellular regeneration and all the other jazz he says.
AV's comments regarding frozen meats don't bother me. I eat both frozen and fresh meats. I understand that Lex eats mostly frozen.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #36 on: August 02, 2011, 11:42:31 am »
Good points Zi. I think I will test myself and my oldest dog who's so miserable on fresh meat to see how we all do. The dogs already eat frozen meat so the next step up would be fresh. Tonight I bought some ground organic grass-fed meat at the store. SCORE! I'll take just a taste and give doggie with mange a taste. I used to give them all fresh meats from the store but not grass-fed and I had to go through bouts of diarrhea that weren't much fun. Maybe grass-fed will be different.

Eve - I've signed things like that before too - it's to get round the guvment - but the FARMER knew I was drinking the milk and not my dogs. I had to at one point to give a farmer a few dollars for a "share of a goat" - so that I legally owned one of the goats that she cared for. Such silliness. So, I would tell anyone else EXCEPT the butcher/farmer that I was giving it my dog. I would probably do a big wink and say with my utmost tone of sarcasm that OF COURSE it COULDN'T be for ME because I would never dream of eating that - and I would probably say out loud "wink, wink" or "a wink's as good as a nod - ya know?" And smack my lips or something - anything to let the person I'm buying from realize that I was going to be eating it - so don't go dragging it on the floor or whatever. But again - one day I might feel like my gut and immune system is so strong that such things wouldn't matter anyway.... hope so.

Phil - you are such a gem. That summary of Lex's journal will be extraordinarily helpful. Just one more question - did he come to the diet with serious health issues?

Hubbie and I were laughing at dinner tonight because he got a great fortune cookie. It was, "People come to conclusions when they're tired of thinking". Precious huh?

I feel like I want to spend more time on the Slankers site and looking around and planning before asking - just in case it's obvious and I just missed it - which is sadly way too likely and I absolutely refuse to ask Lex any questions without getting completely through his journal - so instead I bother you because I'm pretty sure you won't get TOO mad at me.  :D

I'll have a few days because our street is being repaved tomorrow so Here I will be researching and reading.... and we got lots and lots of salmon to last us.

Your idea though to be completely prepared for any outcome when eating this new food is EXCELLENT. I will make sure I have my nux vomica 30c, clay and ipecac ready. Ginger, peppermint and licorice are staples. I too have never been anything close to bulimic or anorexic so making myself throw up because of eating something my body can't handle makes a great deal of sense instead of having to wait it out and let my immune system deal with it.... which usually means sleeping it off for me. I wish I had thought of these things after the prosciutto incident! If I'm going to keep on experimenting on myself I have to be ready that such a thing might happen again. Thanks a million times over for that idea. I will feel much safer now experimenting on myself.

Offline KD

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #37 on: August 02, 2011, 10:01:28 pm »
Yes, I read Tyler's info on high meats and have read about them before, but if I remember right you keep them in the fridge or at least stir them - you don't exactly bury them in the backyard. lol. High meats also are not for newbies it seems - even newbie doggies.

KD and Phil - what is your feeling on freezing vs. fresh meats both in terms of your own experience and your intellectual opinion on the "rumors" about frozen meat being so inferior?

I imagine to some degree that frozen meat is somewhat normal for humans to consume. My take is that since Primal Diets are often catered to very sick people they seem to be fussier sometimes over things that might not be crucially important to others. I do think these things have some substance to it and have experienced some things myself which implies that perhaps it is indeed important for some to be strict about...who knows

I was more saying at first that you might want to avoid the ground organ mixs etc.. at first.. by nature of there being more variables there. Some people are even against ground up meats to begin with. In general I wouldn't stress over that myself or including frozen meats and particularly fats in the diet ( I would skip previously frozen dairy) particularly if I as eating plenty of fresh foods.  

Some people do seem to eat entirely frozen foods but there are many of other people (even those that see frozen food as something entirely natural on this site and don't buy into the AV criticisms) that have mentioned the importance of including a regular portion of fresh animal foods and varying amounts of fresh plant food. On one level you could argue that frozen retains nutrition but there are many things like taste which show that some vitality is gone in frozen food..like with a frozen berry or something. Of course the frozen berry beats a basement of rotten and fermented berries (unless ironically you are AV :) ) So there is a practicality element to frozen food. The high meat thing seems to be a common observation too (that one supposedly cannot really make it from frozen stock - I've made some attempts) So that is one indicator that the bacteria are changed more than just 'subdued' or something..and that possible pathogenic bacteria begin with freezing.

Its true that lex eats most of his food frozen, but if one is to take the same critical position that he basically embodies we cannot look to single individuals to prove that a diet is workable on the individual level or that it is the healthiest option given many options. I believe his main philosophy is finding a diet which facilitates a workable life that is healthy..it isn't about which ratio of fresh meat is ideal over frozen meat. For some maybe this is important. Even if AV's info is wrong or distorted, I doubt he would argue that this couldn't be a factor for some...just doesn't seem to be something worth stressing about on his end I imagine.

To someone like myself I notice some issues when eating lots of frozen meats, suet, and to a lesser degree:bone marrow and not eating enough fresh fats..so in this case I make sure I have plenty of raw fresh animal food and dairy fat with some plant fats. This seems to be the ideal solution or me.

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #38 on: August 03, 2011, 02:31:58 am »
KD -that last post of yours was more helpful to me than perhaps you may realize. Thank you.

Comparing meat to dairy sure does help me because I am at this point very comfortable and familiar with dairy. When I froze my quark it became inedible for me because it tasted so bad in comparison, even though people talk about freezing dairy all the time. The butter was ok, but I felt like I had to eat about ten times the amount. A little bit of fresh butter satisfied me but it took globs before I started to feel satisfied from the same thing frozen. With the way that raw dairy stays good in the fridge even if more sour I would probably get an extra refrigerator if need be rather than fill up my freezer.

I often dehydrate and powder vegetables and eat frozen berries and think that because of availability and ease these are the best choices for me many times. With food there are many things that need to be taken into consideration and it is often about a gradient.

So it is going to take some experimentation to see if meat ends up being more like milk or berries for us.

Thanks again!

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #39 on: August 03, 2011, 05:24:48 am »
Phil - you are such a gem. That summary of Lex's journal will be extraordinarily helpful. Just one more question - did he come to the diet with serious health issues?
Yes, IIRC, he discusses them in his bio (http://www.rawpaleodiet.com/testimonials/lex-rooker-usa/), his journal and elsewhere.

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Hubbie and I were laughing at dinner tonight because he got a great fortune cookie. It was, "People come to conclusions when they're tired of thinking". Precious huh?
Yes, in science and Taoism, as I understand it, there are no final conclusions. We can only say, "this is the best understanding we have achieved up to this point, tomorrow we may learn otherwise."

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Your idea though to be completely prepared for any outcome when eating this new food is EXCELLENT. I will make sure I have my nux vomica 30c, clay and ipecac ready. Ginger, peppermint and licorice are staples.
Sounds like you were already pretty well prepared.

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I too have never been anything close to bulimic or anorexic so making myself throw up because of eating something my body can't handle makes a great deal of sense instead of having to wait it out and let my immune system deal with it....
Yeah, the trick will be determining when to try to soothe the stomach and when to try to empty it. With luck the latter should be rare.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Dorothy

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #40 on: August 03, 2011, 06:57:47 am »
Phil - yet the other missing link of information! Lex's summary of his health journey. Exactly what I needed.

I'm glad I went and checked the forum again while I was sitting and reading through his journal. Now all those numbers he posts make much more sense to me.

You're like a guiding light.  :D


Offline magnetic

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2011, 07:26:58 am »
So, if brains from cows younger than 30 months can be legally sold, where can we buy them? If I had know this detail I might have gotten brains from the slaughterhouse I went to to get lungs, eyes, etc. I remember several of the cows they slaughtered were less than 30 months old. But they are far away and wouldn't ship.

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #42 on: August 03, 2011, 07:50:21 am »
Some places that used to sell brains as people food don't anymore because the demand dropped off, so it depends on the place. Hispanic markets and restaurants in the Southwest USA reportedly still commonly sell them. I've never seen anyone sell them in my area, even before the mad cow scare. I'll bet some farmers would do it but some would probably look at ya funny. :)
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline magnetic

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Re: Braaaaains
« Reply #43 on: August 06, 2011, 12:59:25 am »
The link,http://www.fsis.usda.gov/Fact_Sheets/Slaughter_Inspection_101/index.asp, has some good information regarding the inspection procedure that the USDA uses to identify if SRMs (Specified Risk Materials, which includes brain) are present in cattle being slaughtered. I have been reading up on this because I am searching for a source of beef brains and know that it will probably be a fight with the USDA and their inspectors.

According to this page, http://www.fsis.usda.gov/ofo/tsc/bse_information.htm, the appearance of the second incisor in the teeth of cattle is, according to USDA inspection guidelines, sufficient to consider the cattle to be 30 months or older, and thus certain parts, such as brains, are to be considered SRMs. So the actual age of cattle that you would realistically be able to have a processor get you the brains from would need to be 24 month of age or younger. The USDA considers their method to add a "margin of safety."

Does anyone know at what age grass-fed cattle are typically slaughtered? When I visited a small slaughterhouse the (grass-fed) animals being processed were young, about 18 months if I remember correctly. How old are animals processed for veal?

 

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