Author Topic: Schmallenberg virus  (Read 1446 times)

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Offline raw-al

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Schmallenberg virus
« on: February 27, 2012, 02:14:13 am »
For your information - a newly emerged virus is affecting commercial farm animals. It appeared in Europe during the latter part of 2011, with cases spreading to the southern UK over the winter. It is apparently spread by biting insects, heightening concern because the season is still very early in the northern hemisphere. The last reference below indicates sheep, cattle, goats, and bison are vulnerable. The primary danger is destruction of offspring. More details at articles below.
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from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...-of-lambs.html

Mystery virus kills thousands of lambs

Thousands of lambs have been killed by a new virus that is threatening the survival of many British farms.
25 Feb 2012

The Schmallenberg virus causes lambs to be born dead or with serious deformities such as fused limbs and twisted necks, which mean they cannot survive.

Scientists are urgently trying to find out how the disease, which also affects cattle, spreads and how to fight it, as the number of farms affected increases by the day. [snip]

from http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/agr...d-answers.html

...The disease has been reported in cattle, sheep and goats, but it affects the animals differently. Adult cows suffer fever, reductions in milk yield and diarrhoea, which can affect their body weight and so their value. Adult cattle tend to recover after several days, however, and it is not lethal. There are no clinical symptoms in adult sheep.

The virus has been found to cause cattle, sheep and goats to abort late in their pregnancies, or has resulted in stillbirths. Calves and lambs have been born with severe malformations of the limbs, damage to the spinal cord and fused joints. Some animals born without deformations can have problems with their nervous system.

How has it spread?

It is thought that it has been spread by insects such as midges and mosquitoes, which carry the virus and infect livestock when they bite. The species of insects that is responsible for transmitting the virus has yet to be identified and it is unclear if the virus can be spread from animal to animal. [snip]

from http://www.oie.int/for-the-media/pre...lenberg-virus/

...The Schmallenberg virus is at the origin of an emerging animal disease that has been found in several Western European countries since the second half of 2011. Identified hosts so far are cattle, sheep, goats and bisons...
Cheers
Al

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Schmallenberg virus
« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2012, 02:22:39 am »
Not an issue for us, I reckon. I mean, the BSE crisis didn't affect grassfed meat farmers.Sure, increased useless regulation might harm them and thereby affect us, but we won't be getting diseased meat necessarily.
"What is the point of growing up If you can't be childish sometimes..." - Tom Baker as Dr Who.

Online sabertooth

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Re: Schmallenberg virus
« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2012, 02:36:56 am »
If a virus is causing death and abortion,then it may be a sign that the farm animals are somehow unhealthy to begin with.

Unless the virus is some Genetically  designed monstrosity , I just cant see how it would kill perfectly healthy animals.

Even if it does kill off a large  percentage of farmers flocks we can only assume that the survivors, will have immunity and pass on resistance to the next generation.
A man who makes a beast of himself, forgets the pain of being a man.

 

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