Author Topic: Feasting  (Read 4210 times)

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Offline Wattlebird

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Feasting
« on: December 04, 2012, 04:02:57 am »
It was a great pleasure to host fellow RP Forum member 'Alive' at our place for 7 days recently.
Alive, was keen to see the way I tackled 'instinctive eating' and we had a blast: foraging and nibbling on all types of vegetation on our long bush walks, eating many different seaweeds in states fresh from the water to fermenting in the sun on the beach, hunting  ;) for slow-moving shellfish and sea-urchin, as well as dining on a mouthwatering range of local produce, including kangaroo, lamb, beef-tongue and fish (and of course pounds of vegies, some nuts and fruit).
We also did lots of sensory mindfulness work, both outdoors in the bush and indoors, eating  ;) to our hearts content.
Alive was quite amazed with the volume eaten at some meals too I think, though all the exercise in the outdoors sure works up a hearty appetite!
Eating to appetite, and being mindful when senses start to tell us enough is enough, does not necessarily mean eating like a sparrow and sometimes can mean eating a feast fit for a king.
The pics show Alive and myself ready to dine (one of the smaller meals, generally we were too engrossed in the meal at hand to think about taking photos) and a pic Alive took of yours truly enjoying some fresh sea-urchin.
Alive got into the spirit of the trip, eating lizard tail, using acacia sap to heal some cuts and even learnt how to perfect the Aussie salute (waving flies away from the face)   ;D
A bloody good time was had, thank you Alive.

Offline LePatron7

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Re: Feasting
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2012, 04:27:11 am »
Awesome to see RPDers linking up and having a good time :)
"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.

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Offline Iguana

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Re: Feasting
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2012, 04:38:31 am »
GREAT !!  :)
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Feasting
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2012, 12:38:59 pm »
I'd love to eat some raw fresh sea urchin like that.

Offline Alive

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Re: Feasting
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2012, 01:17:10 pm »
Many thanks Wattlebird for teaching me your instinctive eating and mindfulness practices - I had a fantastic time wandering in nature and eating to full nourishment :D

I have been continuing what you taught - to typically have two meals a day, with breakfast late morning and dinner in the evening. With each meal starting with animal foods and eating each type of RAF one by one until content, then applying the same principle to greens, nuts, fruit, and following up with a little salt. This is leaving me very satisfied and happy to go many hours before the next meal.

Today's breakfast was at noon and consisted of beef, fish, liver, pak choy, pealed soaked almonds, grapes, bananas, and salt. It's now 6 pm and I'm still not hungry. I've had excellent energy and when taking kids to the park started to climb and swing a bit like a monkey :D
« Last Edit: December 04, 2012, 05:33:06 pm by alive »

Offline Wattlebird

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Re: Feasting
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2012, 01:50:28 pm »
Many thanks Wattlebird for teaching me your instinctive eating and mindfulness practices - I had a fantastic time wandering in nature and eating to full nourishment :D

I have been continuing what you taught - to typically have two meals a day, with breakfast late morning and dinner in the evening. With each meal starting with animal foods and eating each type of RAF one by one until content, then applying the same principle to greens, nuts, fruit, and following up with a little salt. Ths is leaving me very satisfied and happy to go many hours before the next meal.

Today's breakfast was at noon and consisted of beef, fish, liver, pak choy, pealed soaked almonds, grapes, bananas, and salt. It's now 6 pm and I'm still not hungry. I've had excellent energy and when taking kids to the park started to climb and swing a bit like a monkey :D

Hi Alive
Would that be a chimpanzee or a bonobo?  ;)
I enjoyed every moment, thats for sure.
Kindest wishes, J

Offline Wattlebird

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Re: Feasting
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2012, 01:52:33 pm »
I'd love to eat some raw fresh sea urchin like that.

Hey CK,
should you ever find yourself in Oz, make your way to the South Coast of NSW. We can eat sea-urchin til we stop!
Kind wishes, J

 

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