Author Topic: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory  (Read 3894 times)

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Offline LePatron7

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AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« on: February 02, 2013, 09:23:56 pm »
Hey everyone. I was thinking about the bacteria on the meat I was cutting up this morning, and it got me to thinking about Aajonous Vonderplanitz's theory about how bacteria, parasites, and viruses eat waste.

When we make high meat, technically the bacteria on the meat are "pre-digesting" the meat or eating it? Well if you leave it to ferment for to long, doesn't it eventually turn completely to liquid?

Any way, it got me to thinking that maybe those bacteria aren't "just" for eating decaying waste. Otherwise no animals in the wild eating their natural diets would have any parasites. And our grass fed meats that we use for high meat wouldn't decompose into a liquid since they'd technically have no waste.

So I was thinking maybe those bacteria/virus/parasites eat away at you constantly, whether you're on a raw diet or not.

I'm a little confused by it all. And was hoping I could get more info.
Disclaimer: I was told I was misdiagnosed over 10 years ago, and I haven't taken any medication in over a decade.

Offline Projectile Vomit

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parasite theory
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2013, 11:30:31 pm »
I think AV's theory has some merit, although I too struggle with how far to take it.

Like human beings, each animal is unique within its species, with its own unique compliment of genetic predispositions and gene expression, and its own unique 'ideal' diet. The diet it actually has access to will deviate from this ideal to varying degrees, both in general due to where it lives and also temporally due to natural 'lack and larder' (terminology from Jon Young and Tom Brown Jr.) cycles imposed by the seasonal availability of different foods. This deviation means that no animal, even in the 'wild', actually eats its ideal diet, although it might come close, to varying degrees and at varying times of the year. So the fact that wild animals (and wild humans) do sometimes suffer from disease and parasite infestations shouldn't surprise us.

Those animals (and wild humans) that choose to live in areas that force their diet to deviate from their genetic ideal will tend to show more frequent and more severe signs of disease, and will be more susceptible to parasite infestation and bacterial/viral infection. Those animals that choose to live in areas that allow their actual diet to closely match their genetic ideal will show fewer and more mild signs of disease, and will be less susceptible to parasite infestation and bacterial/viral infection.

On the other hand though, parasites, bacteria and viruses all benefit from not killing their hosts, so if a parasite/bacteria/virus starts using human beings as a host one would expect that while those initial infestations might result in serious symptoms in the host or even death, evolution would push the parasite/bacteria/virus towards a more symbiotic relationship with its host so as to avoid ending its genetic lineage when it kills its  host.

That's my current thinking on the topic anyway. I look forward to reading what others share.

Offline LePatron7

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2013, 01:08:17 am »
Very interesting Eric. Thanks for that.
Disclaimer: I was told I was misdiagnosed over 10 years ago, and I haven't taken any medication in over a decade.

Offline Alive

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2013, 04:07:42 am »
I have noticed that, since eating high meat, if I eat high carb SMD foods and then switch back to RPD my tongue tastes like high meat. It seems as though the bacteria from the high meat get into action to digest the excess carb residues. At first I wondered if it might be a detox of stored high meat wastes, but when it happened a few times I figured it must be that the bacteria were waiting for the opportunity to feed on these waste products, and as a side effect provide a benefit to me.

A recent New Scientist magazine had an interesting article about how the liver detoxes many wastes by outsourcing the job to bacteria. Apparently the liver attaches a carb molecule to many toxins and releases them back into the bloodstream. Normally when these toxins enter intestines bacteria digest them in return for the  carbs. That's if you have an effective microbe community, but if you have a microbe imbalance then they may just take the energy molecule and leave the toxins to circulate around your body again... ... ... ...

I have been wondering if bacteria from hot areas of volcanic activity would provide benefits to cooked food eaters, since these bacteria would be the most evolved to process heat denatured compounds.

   
« Last Edit: February 03, 2013, 04:30:13 am by alive »

Offline LePatron7

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2013, 09:39:52 am »
A recent New Scientist magazine had an interesting article about how the liver detoxes many wastes by outsourcing the job to bacteria. Apparently the liver attaches a carb molecule to many toxins and releases them back into the bloodstream. Normally when these toxins enter intestines bacteria digest them in return for the  carbs. That's if you have an effective microbe community, but if you have a microbe imbalance then they may just take the energy molecule and leave the toxins to circulate around your body again... ... ... ...

Interesting stuff! Apparently, in humans, those digestive tract bacteria are definitely carb lovers.
Disclaimer: I was told I was misdiagnosed over 10 years ago, and I haven't taken any medication in over a decade.

Offline Iguana

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2013, 06:22:10 pm »
Aajonous Vonderplanitz's theory about how bacteria, parasites, and viruses eat waste.
Could anyone provide a link for this theory or shortly summarize it?
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline Projectile Vomit

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2013, 11:15:32 pm »
From discussions in AV's books We Want to Live and Recipes for Living Without Disease, his theory generally is that parasites, bacteria and viruses (PBV) feed on dead or damaged tissue in the human body, and only when this tissue proliferates because of poor diet and high toxic burdens will PBVs proliferate to the point that they cause pathogenic symptoms. Provided that we maintain a healthy diet and control our toxic exposures, our immune system will keep populations of PBVs in check and their presence will not be detrimental, and might even be beneficial since they clean out what little dead or damaged tissue remains in our bodies.

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2013, 03:23:38 am »
I have noticed that, since eating high meat, if I eat high carb SMD foods and then switch back to RPD my tongue tastes like high meat. It seems as though the bacteria from the high meat get into action to digest the excess carb residues. At first I wondered if it might be a detox of stored high meat wastes, but when it happened a few times I figured it must be that the bacteria were waiting for the opportunity to feed on these waste products, and as a side effect provide a benefit to me.

A recent New Scientist magazine had an interesting article about how the liver detoxes many wastes by outsourcing the job to bacteria. Apparently the liver attaches a carb molecule to many toxins and releases them back into the bloodstream. Normally when these toxins enter intestines bacteria digest them in return for the  carbs. That's if you have an effective microbe community, but if you have a microbe imbalance then they may just take the energy molecule and leave the toxins to circulate around your body again... ... ... ...

I have been wondering if bacteria from hot areas of volcanic activity would provide benefits to cooked food eaters, since these bacteria would be the most evolved to process heat denatured compounds.

   

Mind blown as usual, so cool!!!

Offline eveheart

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2013, 08:57:51 am »
I'm not comfortable with giving credit for that theory to AV. It just sounds like a description of decomposers in nature. I don't see any conceptual difference between animal gut bacteria and bacteria that break down a forest's vegetative material to humus. There is no special kind of waste that bacteria break down vs. some other material that breaks down in some other way.

So, yes, bacteria etc., do their jobs continually, but I wouldn't call it "eating away at you."
"I intend to live forever; so far, so good." -Steven Wright, comedian

Offline Iguana

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Re: AV's bacteria/virus/parssite theory
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2013, 05:16:56 pm »
Yes, I feel the same but thanks to Eric anyway.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

 

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