Author Topic: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)  (Read 5724 times)

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Offline goodsamaritan

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How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« on: February 18, 2013, 09:55:23 pm »
Nice talk.

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_buettner_how_to_live_to_be_100.html

Dan thinks it's more about the people we are friends with, hang out with.

If the internet gets better and we have more video and there are more of us raw paleo dieter friends... we could then support one another and live longer and better.
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Offline TylerDurden

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2013, 02:47:33 am »
 No one has yet managed to decipher all the things that  make people live longer, really. Obviously, modern medicine has allowed people to live longer and the lower stress of modern life  has helped also. I am not convinced, though, that  socialising makes one live longer as the much older people I've seen who were the least affected by ill-health were also the ones who were self-sufficient and didn't need others' support.

Offline eveheart

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2013, 02:54:08 am »
In one often quoted study of centenarians, neither diet nor exercise were contributing factors to longevity. The top 5 were:
  • Has a circle of friends
  • Resolves anger quickly
  • Has some form of spirituality
  • Refrains from worry
  • Forgives quickly
"I intend to live forever; so far, so good." -Steven Wright, comedian

Offline Adora

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2013, 04:04:47 am »
Most think of themselves as making healthy choices, by there own evaluation. But, I agree with Eve, every able older adult is most remarkably peaceful and indepentant of  thought and action, though not often demonstrative about it. Those few that are more outspoken/lively are full of good humor.
    99y/o reciently in hospital. Adorable gentleman, retrieved my pen from the floor, when I dropped it, before I could stop him, and I moved quickly. Insisted I call him by his first name, say that his father was Mr. So and So. He was tall, built sturdy with good tone and sharp whit. He couldn't come up with any reason he was healthy. He said it's not genetics, my kids are all sick, and in fact, the 2 I met looked older than him.
    Most seem to enjoy life, no matter what they are doing or what's going on.
Diet is important, but I agree attitude trumps it.
know thyself and all of the mysteries of the gods and the universe will be revealed.
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Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2013, 04:18:46 am »
The average centenarian grew up on a farm and ate way better growing up than most people do now a days.

They might even have been eating higher quality meat than what people on this forum get, back then.

I have been meaning to write about it for a while, but what people called "beef" back then was totally different, even from modern grass fed beef and modern grain fed beef is like veal in comparison.

Offline tests

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2013, 09:36:19 am »
I don't really care to live till 100. Quality of life > quantity IMO.

Offline Dr. D

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2013, 10:42:22 am »
I don't really care to live till 100. Quality of life > quantity IMO.

I agree. I'm not looking for diet health to live to 100. I'm seeking to improve my day to day enjoyment. If a diet will make me lose weight but make me feel sick while doing it, I don't want it. If I stay the same weight while rpd, but can clear my head and get back the joy I once had, I will maintain this diet for life very easily.
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Offline tests

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2013, 04:03:47 pm »
I agree. I'm not looking for diet health to live to 100. I'm seeking to improve my day to day enjoyment. If a diet will make me lose weight but make me feel sick while doing it, I don't want it. If I stay the same weight while rpd, but can clear my head and get back the joy I once had, I will maintain this diet for life very easily.

I agree. I want a diet that gets rid of my skin problem, makes me feel alive

Offline raw-al

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #8 on: August 10, 2013, 04:20:17 am »
The average centenarian grew up on a farm and ate way better growing up than most people do now a days.

They might even have been eating higher quality meat than what people on this forum get, back then.

I have been meaning to write about it for a while, but what people called "beef" back then was totally different, even from modern grass fed beef and modern grain fed beef is like veal in comparison.
Gotta go with you on that one. The only centarian I know grew up on a farm, then worked for a company when I knew him. He walked to work about 9.9 Kms (6.1 miles) often. He appeared to be travelling just under the speed of sound. ;)

As Eve and Adora mentioned this guy was a well spoken, gentle and rarely said any disparaging about others. He and his wife (died at 98) also put up with a bunch of us teenagers in the basement playing everything from Grand Funk Railroad, to Zep for all our high school years with nary a complaint. That takes courage under fire.

He pushed his wife around in a  wheelchair on their walks before she died. He only left his house at age 96 or 98 because cooking was too hard for his wife basically.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2013, 07:28:32 pm by TylerDurden »
Cheers
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Offline political atheist

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2017, 09:15:20 pm »
Singh shot to fame when, at the age of 93, he completed the 26.2 mile(42km) distance in 6 hours and 54 minutes. This knocked 58 minutes off the previous world best for anyone in the 90-plus age bracket.

Singh is 172 cm (5 ft 8 in) tall and weighs 52 kg (115 lb). He attributes his physical fitness and longevity to abstaining from smoking and alcohol and to following a simple vegetarian diet.
He has been quoted as saying: "I am very careful about different foods.

My diet is simple:
- phulka(unleavened flatbread)
- dal(dried lentils, peas, and beans)
- green vegetables
- yogurt
- milk

I do not touch parathas(layers of fried dough), pakoras(is a fried snack), rice or any other FRIED food.

I take lots of water and tea with ginger.

I go to bed early taking the name of my Rabba (God) as I don’t want all those negative thoughts crossing my mind."

Speaking about the marathon, he said: "The first 20 miles are not difficult. As for last six miles, I run while talking to God."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fauja_Singh

Offline surfsteve

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Re: How to Live to be 100+ (Join our Forum)
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2017, 09:40:24 am »


Emma Morano, of Verbania, Italy, has celebrated her 115th birthday.

She was born on 29 November 1899.

Here is a pre-birthday report from yesterday, roughly translated in to English:

In his ride through the centuries this girl of 1899 reminds us of the importance of simplicity. Starting right from the diet that brought her to reach this milestone special breakfast with an egg and toast, pasta for lunch with a pound of minced raw meat and a jar of fruit; 15 to the second egg and some cookies. At 18 still noodles at midnight a little 'banana lyophilized.

"How am I? Well, quiet - responds -. As a Pope. " The difference is that she is in the chair to tell, but from the day of his birth to now the chair of Peter took turns eleven popes. By Leo XIII to Francis. Needless to investigate, however, the Pope Argentine. The expression is the same when you hear the name of the Prime Minister today, Matteo Renzi: "No, I do not know them. Television has been so long since I watch more, Rete 4 hours watching me tired. The King? Yes, I remember him, and even the Queen. " The tribute of memory is to Vittorio Emanuele III, ascended the throne a year after the birth of Emma, ??29 November 1899 in the village of Vercelli Civiasco. Of course, today there is a republic and Emma knows: the prefect Francesco Russo this year will deliver the greetings of President Napolitano who has been awarded, with Prime Minister Monti, the title of knight. The diploma is on display on the counter in the kitchen, next to the only box of medicines. "The doctor - smiles near the radiator - is once a month for the controls, I have just received the results of the analysis, it's all right." The flu vaccine? Never done, confirms Dr. Carlo Bava.

For many years Emma Morano does not go out of her apartment Pallanza. It is therefore within the walls of the home world of the grandmother of Europe arrived to put out 115 candles. Regular hours, two eggs a day and a pound of raw ground beef: this is the secret of longevity that repeats to anyone who goes to see.
http://z3.invisionfree.com/The_110_Club/index.php?showtopic=11341




I’m sure that many of us read with interest the announcement on Tuesday - by Survival International, an indigenous rights group working in the Amazon – that the world’s (assumed) oldest living person is about to celebrate her 121st birthday.  Maria Lucimar Pereira is one of the Kaxinawá tribe, and lives in the western Brazilian Amazon. She says she will spend her birthday, on September 3rd, with her family.

If you have an interest in the paleo diet or ancestral health, no doubt you will have focused, like me, on the details of her diet and lifestyle:

    Maria has never lived in a city and puts her longevity of life down to a healthy lifestyle. She only eats natural foods from the forest: grilled meat, monkey, fish, manioc (a root vegetable), and banana porridge.  She does not eat salt, sugar, or any processed foods.

Meat, fish, vegetables, fruit, no processed foods, a focus on local produce - a practically paleo approach.  Could it be that this has contributed to her longevity?  Survival’s Director, Stephen Corry, thinks so:

    All too often we witness the negative effects forced change can have on indigenous peoples. It is refreshing to see a community that has retained strong links to its ancestral land and enjoyed the undeniable benefits of this.

Although little research has been done on the link between the paleo diet and longevity, it is well known that caloric restriction extends life span and retards age-related chronic diseases in a variety of species, including rats, mice, fish, flies, worms, and yeast (as outlined in this Review Article from the Clinical Journal of American Nutrition).  What’s not clear yet is exactly what mechanism causes this to be so.

Nevertheless, is it too much of a stretch to speculate that the mechanism – whatever it is – may also be at work in the paleo diet?

Perhaps not.  Consider a study, published in 2009 in the Journal of Applied Research, entitled “Clinical Experience of a Diet Designed to Reduce Aging”.  The parts to note are, respectively, what the study subjects ate, and how the diet affected them.  In terms of eating, the diet followed wasn’t strictly paleo, but it came pretty close to it.  Study subjects were instructed to:

    1. Eat unlimited fats
    2. Restrict protein to 1-1.25g/kg lean body mass
    3. Limit carbohydrate intake to non-starchy vegetables
    4. Eat to satisfy hunger

Fats in the diet were obtained from raw nuts and seeds, avocados, olives, and olive, flax and cod liver oils.  Subjects were instructed to consume 50-80g of protein per day (depending on their body weight) from sardines, fish, eggs, chicken, turkey, wild meats, tofu, unprocessed low-fat cheeses, and vegetable burgers.  Whilst some of the foods consumed – the last three items, for example – don’t pass the paleo test, the bulk of the diet did.  The macronutrient ratio also bore a close resemblance to the paleo profile: 30% of calories from protein, 10% from carbohydrate, and 60% from fat.

Interestingly – given that the study subjects were not required to consciously restrict their caloric intake – the results of their post-study blood work indicated blood chemistry changes that closely parallel those experienced in calorie-restricted diets, and presumed to be associated with increased markers of longevity. Insulin dropped by 40%, glucose by 8%, leptin by 48%, triglycerides by 28%, free T3 by 11%, and blood pressure by 10% systolic and 11% diastolic.  The study’s authors note:

    Similar findings were reported in caloric restricted rodents, monkeys, humans,
    and centenarians. It has been suggested that the reduction in T3 and
    body temperature could alter the aging process by reflecting a reducing
    metabolic rate, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation.

Of course, one study does not a proof make.  Nonetheless, it’s interesting – and encouraging – to consider that following the paleo diet could result in the positive metabolic effects of caloric restriction without the associated hunger and possible malnutrition.  We all know that the paleo diet can be highly satisfying – could it be life-extending too?

Whatever the answer to that question - I’m sure you’ll join Paleo Diet News in wishing Maria Lucimar Pereira a very happy, healthy 121st birthday for Saturday!

http://paleodietnews.com/2046/longevity-and-the-paleo-diet/



 

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