Author Topic: Zero-carbers question  (Read 6405 times)

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Offline TylerDurden

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Zero-carbers question
« on: December 13, 2008, 10:25:39 pm »
Here's a reference to a study which claims that going cooked- zero-carb(or even cooked-low-carb) wrecks your memory. Can't say that I've ever suffered from memory-loss after going raw zero-carb and low-carb doesn't harm me either, but I was wondering what others have experienced re this(perhaps this only affects cooked-low-carbers:-


"Atkins-style low carb diets 'can cause memory loss'
Atkins-style low carbohydrate diets made popular by a string of celebrity devotees can cause memory loss, a new study suggests.
 
By Kate Devlin, Medical Correspondent
Last Updated: 1:58PM GMT 12 Dec 2008

 Slimmers struggle with memory problems after just one week on the restrictive eating plans, researchers found.

The diets, endorsed by the likes of Hollywood actress Renée Zellweger, encourage dieters to cut out carbohydrates like pasta, bread, potatoes and even some fruit and vegetables.

They have proved controversial in recent years amid claims that they can cause heart problems and other dangerous side effects.

The new research suggests that the diet can also harm the memory.

Scientists think that the findings, published in the journal Appetite, could be because of the way in which the brain uses glucose, a type of sugar obtained from carbohydrates in food, as a form of fuel.

Glucose cannot be stored, so our minds need a constant supply of the sugar to power our brain cells.

Professor Holly Taylor, from Tufts University, in Massachusetts, who led the study, said that when carbohydrates were re-introduced to the women's diets their mental function appeared to return to normal.

She added: "This study demonstrates that the food you eat can have an immediate impact on cognitive behaviour. The popular low-carb, no-carb diets have the strongest potential for negative impact on thinking and cognition."

The study monitored 19 women aged between 22 and 55, who started to follow either a low carbohydrate diet or one based on a more traditional low fat approach.

After just one week on the low carbohydrate eating plan the women started to suffer from memory problems, the results of the study showed.

There was a gradual decline in their ability to perform memory-related tasks compared to women who were on the low fat diet, the study found, and their reaction times also became slower.

However, those eating a low carbohydrate diet did perform better on short-term attention tests than those on the more conventional eating plan.

Professor Taylor said: "Although the study had a modest sample size, the results showed a clear difference in cognitive performance as a function of diet.

"The data suggests that after a week of severe carbohydrate restriction, memory performance, particularly on difficult tasks, is impaired.

"It suggests that diets can affect more than just weight."

She warned that the effects of the diet could involve more than just memory.

"The brain needs glucose for energy and diets low in carbohydrates can be detrimental to learning, memory and thinking," she said.

At the height of its popularity an estimated three million people in Britain were thought to be on the Atkins diet.

Other celebrity followers included Geri Halliwell, the former Spice Girl and Jennifer Aniston, the former Friends actress.

It recommended eating large amounts of protein while almost eliminating carbohydrates entirely, including fruit.

"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline Kristelle

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2008, 08:16:34 pm »
It's normal for memory and other functions to decline the first week or even couple of weeks on ZC. The body is adapting to a new fuel. The problem with these studies is that it's short-term and doesn't take into account the adaptation period.

I've learned, through trial and error, that the key to making zero-carb work is to eat very high amount of fat. This will make a world of difference. For the longest time, I thought my problems were caused by too much fat but it was exactly the opposite.


JaX

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2008, 05:31:43 am »
I've often had a very active mind, getting stressed out. When I'm on low carb it seems to calm me down and yes it does seem to slow down thought a little but I only find that positive.


It's normal for memory and other functions to decline the first week or even couple of weeks on ZC. The body is adapting to a new fuel. The problem with these studies is that it's short-term and doesn't take into account the adaptation period.

I've learned, through trial and error, that the key to making zero-carb work is to eat very high amount of fat. This will make a world of difference. For the longest time, I thought my problems were caused by too much fat but it was exactly the opposite.



Which cuts or organs have the most fat? I'm probably getting too much protein compared to fat, but I can't get bone marrow, so I'm left with organs and muscle meats, which both seem very lean to me. I can get lard or maybe suet but how do you eat that? Doesn't that have to be heated and melted?


Kristelle what do you think the ideal fat:protein calorie ratio is?

livingthelife

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2008, 05:52:45 am »
I can get lard or maybe suet but how do you eat that? Doesn't that have to be heated and melted?

I just started eating suet. I break it into little chunks and swallow it like pills. It's very solid at room temp. I can't eat very much this way, however, only about 1 oz at a time.

I think lard is rendered fat, meaning it's fat that has been cooked down into a paste? not raw?

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2008, 08:03:07 pm »
Lard and tallow are heated fats, suet is the raw fat.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
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Offline Kristelle

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2008, 09:29:18 pm »
You will have to find that ratio for yourself but the 80/20 ratio seems to be pretty popular. If you really can't get suet, hide-fat or bone marrow, then maybe include butter. Raw or heated, whichever you deem is more healthy. Your call!

Offline ezekiel

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #6 on: December 15, 2008, 11:57:25 pm »
I think only heated pig fat is called Lard. Heated cow fat is just called rendered fat. Unless it is rendered suet, which is called tallow.

JaX

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2008, 07:39:07 am »
You will have to find that ratio for yourself but the 80/20 ratio seems to be pretty popular. If you really can't get suet, hide-fat or bone marrow,

I still don't completely understand the distinction between these types of fats. I don't even know which meat cuts are fattier. Could you please try to lay that out for me? Maybe show your own meal plan for a couple of days, so I can get an idea of what cut/organs are eaten mostly and what fat you supplement it with.


then maybe include butter. Raw or heated, whichever you deem is more healthy. Your call!

That's a trick question! I just know it! :p

Unfortunately, where I live now I can't get raw butter, only raw milk... And I don't plan on eating ultra pasteurized butter, no matter how organic it is, by the spoonful.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #8 on: December 21, 2008, 04:19:20 am »
Suet is the more internal fat of the animal that surrounds the organs. The hide fat is what is normally associated with the trimmings around steaks and other cuts of meat. I think suet is a little softer and therefore easier to eat raw, but I just got two orders of bison fat, one the hide fat and one suet, so I'll let you know how the compare in a while. Then the marrow is totally different and by far my favorite. It's the inner fat of the long bones of the body. It's the softest of all of them and therefore easiest to eat and to my taste the most tasty. The main draw back is that you order the bones and scoop out the marrow, meaning you are paying for the per weight cost of bones that you aren't consuming, making the marrow at least twice as expensive but probably more than 3 times.

Offline avalon

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Re: Zero-carbers question
« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2008, 04:25:24 am »
I want to be thin and I can't remember what else I was going to say  :D  Wine shrinks your brain  :(

 

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