Author Topic: The Butcher  (Read 29595 times)

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Online sabertooth

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #50 on: September 12, 2013, 06:50:05 am »


Stabbed myself today while cutting the tendon of a pig leg. Its a deep puncture wound that hurts like hell.
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #51 on: September 12, 2013, 09:11:29 am »
Flaxseed meal poultice might help--such as boil some flaxseed meal, soak a clean rag in it, let it cool, put it on the wound and tie it up with an ace bandage and wear it overnight. It helped my father when a nail went clear through his foot.
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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #52 on: September 12, 2013, 09:27:56 am »
Put some raw honey on it. I was wondering about the odds of cutting yourself while doing that. Does your butcher boss ever cut himself?
« Last Edit: September 12, 2013, 10:39:35 am by cherimoya_kid »

Online sabertooth

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #53 on: September 12, 2013, 09:42:04 am »
Its happens to even the best butchers. They all have stories of being cut and stabbed.

My boss when he was 19 ran a 4 inch knife right into his gut while boning out a hind quarter. It missed his liver by an inch. He said he was in a hurry so that he could get ready for a first date. She had to meet him in the hospital, and they have been together ever since.
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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #54 on: September 12, 2013, 10:39:56 am »
Stay safe, dude.

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #55 on: September 12, 2013, 10:41:40 am »
Flaxseed meal poultice might help--such as boil some flaxseed meal, soak a clean rag in it, let it cool, put it on the wound and tie it up with an ace bandage and wear it overnight. It helped my father when a nail went clear through his foot.

I've used boiled flaxseed oil (people call it linseed, but it's the same stuff) on wood plenty of times, but never knew boiled flax could be used as a poultice.

Offline jessica

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #56 on: September 12, 2013, 11:56:35 am »
Last time I had a deep puncture wounds that wasn't stitch able I flushed it out with alcohol and then used some honey that I had put cayenne pepper in to infuse and put that on there and just held my hand closed for like two weeks, but I guess you could just lightly cover it.  if it doesn't stop bleeding you can use bentonite clay, but you don't really want a serious scab over it til it heal up inside, so just keep it cleanish by rinsing it if it gets too grubby but don't worry to  much.  I almost stabbed through a hand with all types of dirt and goat shit all over it, the rancher next door, an old paramedic, told me to wash my damn hands and then decided it was too deep to stitch, he was down with honey and bentonite, but it hink yours may be too deep for the clay until it heals internally a little, cant really tell from the photos.

Offline LePatron7

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #57 on: September 12, 2013, 12:06:57 pm »
My boss when he was 19 ran a 4 inch knife right into his gut while boning out a hind quarter. It missed his liver by an inch. He said he was in a hurry so that he could get ready for a first date. She had to meet him in the hospital, and they have been together ever since.

Romantic <3 lol
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Online sabertooth

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #58 on: September 18, 2013, 08:49:04 am »
Culled a cow with a rectal prolapse the other day. While skinning her my boss pointed out a big patch of scared tissue, when he said she was given a shot at one time. They vaccinate cows in the neck that is used for burger now so that scar tissue isn't found in peoples rump roast.

Which leads me to the issue of vaccines, sure you may be eating grass fed but how many of you eat animals that are getting pumped full of Genetically modified viral DNA injections? Do you Know for sure?

Got to work on a sterioded beef today. I was telling my boss how the meat had a clay like consistency. He told that it was most likely due to steroids put in the feed. It was weird how when it was ground into burger that it seemed to hold in all its moisture. Steroids cause the tissue to have a clay like   absorbency. 
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Offline jessica

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #59 on: September 18, 2013, 09:00:56 am »
My farmer friend from Equador, he is a native and lives in the rural indian farming villages down there, he had a scar from the vaccinations he and all of the kids in the village were given.  They all had these horrible scars from the vaccinations.

You have to know who's raising our animals.  Many are raising animals "holistically" without the use of vaccinations.  But you have to know.

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #60 on: September 19, 2013, 12:22:10 pm »
I am certainly not an expert but i may have researched more information on worms than anyone here so my two cents. i think the only parasite to really worry about in ruminants is liver fluke. not even sure we can get it from eating the meat. you can get it from snails, their eggs i think even their slime trail. so you could easily get it even from washed lettuce.    pig shit might even be able to kill you. at least it can cause permanent cysts in the muscles and the brain. do not ingest pig or human shit especially. canine, bear, pig, coon, rat...               

Normally cow, goat and sheep shit is fairly safe to eat. a sick animals shit may get you sick with a bad bacteria or perhaps even coccideosis a tiny parasite that is usually always present but mostly only harmful at heavy infestation levels. humans I believe can get lungworm and heartworm but i am pretty sure we don`t share the same species of those worms with ruminants. in an analogy to cars, it's like there are several makes of worms but most are by necessity specialized in a few different species so there is a different model for different animals. sheep and goats share many but cows share few with either of them. horses and pigs share none. different species are literally used sometimes by necessity to clean grasslands of parasite infestations.

If a cow eats a sheep parasite the parasite dies and visa versa. but it gets more confusing. one school of thought is that you should alternate pastures of species to keep a cleaner pasture. however studies show that when multi species grazing with cows and sheep together, the sheep have higher worm loads than in the former method yet actually grow faster than either rotating cows and sheep or by only raising sheep. this shows that cows somehow make sheep grow faster in multiple ways yet to be proven.                                 

Colonic might not worn very well at all on worms, even tape worms. tape worms are not harmful usually. worms in general are mostly harmless unless you are in a poor state of nutrition or immunity or your loaded with them. you wouldn't be loaded with them if you were not any of those first. it is probably important to ingest too many though as even healthy stock can take a hit from them. but how healthy are they? animals have actually been bred to be intolerant of them through the constant use of worm medication. now a days the parasites have become so resistant that the chemical worners barely work.                                       

How to prevent infestation in livestock? rotate pastures to allow rest, heat and dry make life in the pasture hard for worms. employ ducks, chickens and turkeys. they scratch up dung piles, making them dry out faster making them a more poor place for them to live and actually ingest a great deal of them. use herbs and poisonous plants and high tannin plants and high copper plants. birds foot treefoil, chicory, willow and poplar are supposed to help and are good every day feeds. garlic, ginger, oregano all are good tonics that kill worms. black walnut hulls and wormwood are the main herbal worm nukes. as i said also plants high in copper, saint john's wort, heliotrope work wonders  which leads me to perhaps the most important info i have to give today                               

Copper is thought of as the mineral throw switch of parasites. having a high copper blood level exiles them from the body. my secret weapon is what they use to turn pools blue. copper sulfate is one of the few chemicals my animals ever eat. it is poison and can destroy the liver. it is safe in small batches the liver can handle. somehow mixing it with calcium makes it safe, or at least dolomite does. i try to mix it with as many minerals as possible and also offer the minerals without copper. they eat more without the copper but eat the copper too. they usually know how much they need. rarely i drop a bunch in the mouth of a reluctant eater.

The best prevention is copper in the plants and a high level of nutrition. most pastures are sewn and even sprayed to prevent weeds and a lot of soil in humid climates and everywhere is low on copper. low copper is a factor in mad cow and likely human mental diseases. it also cures foot rot, ring worm, lice the shits often... they use it in fish only aquariums to kill parasites. plants, coral, crabs, starfish, octopus cannot handle it.      hope this helps                     
« Last Edit: September 20, 2013, 01:56:01 am by cherimoya_kid »

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #61 on: September 19, 2013, 01:05:18 pm »
Interesting stuff, RogueFarmer.  You might want to break up long posts like that into paragraphs.  It's kind of hard for people who don't already know the subject to read a big block of text like that.

That's interesting about the chickens/ducks being mixed with cows to help reduce parasites. That sounds like a Joel Salatin trick.  Is it?

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #62 on: September 19, 2013, 08:36:30 pm »
i thought i did. bell phone does not allow for paragraph spacing it would seem. i got no problem with someone editing it for me ha! i cant at the moment. yes it is a joel salatin trick to follow cows with chickens. based of corse on natures model. i have parasitic cow birds in my pasture. not sure what exactly they eat but it seems they eat flies and peck at the cow pies. they have cow birds down south that are a type of egret that actually perch on the cows. in the ocean there are cleaner fish and shrimp that other fish make pit stops at coral reefs to get parasites cleaned off. even letting the little fish and shrimps to swim into their mouth and gills to remove them. dogs have an acid bath for to kill bacteria and parasites. aajonus said we make just as much hydrochloric acid but more in the small intestine. so do we have to be more careful? probably. the people who really ought to worry about them are those without a good source of protein, minerals and vitamins.

Offline jessica

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #63 on: September 19, 2013, 09:15:17 pm »
High copper is also a factor in human mental health, or perhaps its only high copper in relation to low zinc.....but I do like the suggestion of letting them browse on saint johns wart, its called Klamath weed out here and considered an invasive species.  Wish I would have gathered much  more seed then I did, I also wish I woulda been more careful around bear, pig, and snail poop, I am pretty sure I have ingested all three.  Thanks for the info Rogue.

Online sabertooth

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #64 on: September 20, 2013, 06:47:43 am »
I don't think I have any worms, I am fairly convinced that weakness, lethargy, and low platelets are do to a reemergence of the blood parasites, I contracted years before doing any raw paleo.
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Online sabertooth

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #65 on: September 20, 2013, 07:31:11 am »

 This cow was 33 months, pasture raised and was as healthy as can be.

Federal regulations make us cut out the head and spine of animals 30 months or older, as precaution against mad cow.
Which is ludicrous.
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Offline ys

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #66 on: September 21, 2013, 10:53:06 pm »
I finally got to the beef front leg and not too sure what's the best way to handle it.

Usually it is cut into shanks with bone in the middle using band saw.  Shanks is one of the toughest cuts and usually destined for slow cookers.

So I separated major muscles and as you can see there a lot of connective tissue.   These in turn contain smaller bundles of muscles and more connective tissue.  It is time consuming to get the toughest connective tissue out.  I can't get rid of all connective tissue in reasonable amount of time.

So how do you guys handle legs?

 

Offline Iguana

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #67 on: September 21, 2013, 11:43:13 pm »
Whole, like this in the lower part of the fridge:

« Last Edit: September 22, 2013, 12:01:01 am by Iguana »
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline jessica

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #68 on: September 21, 2013, 11:46:24 pm »
I think as the connective tissue ages it get brittle/dry and easier to chew through, i generally swallow whats left after i have chewed all the meat off.

Offline Iguana

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #69 on: September 21, 2013, 11:52:06 pm »
Yes, they do once they are like that! But you can eat it before as well... ;D And sometimes, a good knife helps  ;)


Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Online sabertooth

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #70 on: September 23, 2013, 08:20:05 am »
I finally got to the beef front leg and not too sure what's the best way to handle it.

Usually it is cut into shanks with bone in the middle using band saw.  Shanks is one of the toughest cuts and usually destined for slow cookers.

Iguana, that's a nice looking leg, How long as it been aging?

So I separated major muscles and as you can see there a lot of connective tissue.   These in turn contain smaller bundles of muscles and more connective tissue.  It is time consuming to get the toughest connective tissue out.  I can't get rid of all connective tissue in reasonable amount of time.

So how do you guys handle legs?

 

Yeah I just let the legs hang in he fridge and cut of what I need for feeding time.

Iguana, that's a good looking leg, How long has it been aging?
« Last Edit: September 23, 2013, 08:26:57 am by sabertooth »
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Offline Iguana

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #71 on: September 23, 2013, 03:23:47 pm »
2 months or perhaps a little more, I think.

Did you get my e-mail?
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline jessica

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #72 on: October 15, 2013, 07:12:07 am »

Online sabertooth

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #73 on: October 23, 2013, 09:15:17 am »
I was laid off from the butcher shop today.

I think the owner is a little paranoid about German reporters calling him for permission to film.

Oh well its for the best, they weren't paying me well and I wasn't planning on staying there very long anyway.

Its nothing to be sad about, tomorrow I am going to apply to a large grass fed processing plant. Its run by the man who let us film the RTL segment at his facility. He even cut off some samples for me to eat raw on camera, and gave me a cows head.

Wish me luck, if all goes well I will be making much more money and have access to all the scraps from grass fed cows I could possibly want.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2013, 11:01:21 am by cherimoya_kid »
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: The Butcher
« Reply #74 on: October 23, 2013, 09:44:52 am »
good luck ST
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

 

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