Author Topic: Lex's Journal  (Read 556744 times)

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coconinoz

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #75 on: July 26, 2008, 03:24:30 am »

lex says:
"when I'm exercising there is no surplus of free fatty acids around to create a new triglyceride as the FFAs are being used by the muscles for fuel."

lex & all in the know:
could you please elaborate on muscle fuel? what are the conditions leading to & the results of the muscles using glucose, ketones, fatty acids?

thanks & ve well


Offline iamdj

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #76 on: July 26, 2008, 03:31:17 am »
Firstly, I like to say, congrats, to all of you for trying diets that go against the modern diet. Cleary the, classic modern diet, refined grains, and the like has caused an epidemic of health problems.

I first came to this blog because of Ted Slanker's emails. I someday hope to afford grass-fed beef only.

I think Cheryl makes some great points, I'm also sure that Lex will look into his PH levels if he hasn't already.

My view on the Paleo diet is that while I believe that our ancestors, the earliest, must have eaten meat raw. At some point, after the discovery to make fires on demand, they might have started cooking their food, or at least tried it. I have no evidence of this or any idea why they may have cooked their food. Curiosity? Increased time before spoilage? Taste? But, also I can only imagine that they ate berries, nuts, grubs, bugs, seeds, root vegetables and perhaps even certain green leaves. I thought I read once that the ICE MAN, they found a few years back had a sack of seeds on him. I could be wrong.

I don't have any issues with the RAW meat versus cooked idea, other than certain pathogens that might be killed by cooking. I don't understand the raw meat ONLY approach. Do I have this right? Is this forum for those who eat raw meat only?

I'd like to hear or read more about this approach. Specifically as to why you choose not to eat ANY vegetables.

Thanks!

Dave ;D

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #77 on: July 26, 2008, 05:08:54 am »
This forum is for people that eat a primarily raw animal food based diet as far as I know.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #78 on: July 26, 2008, 05:21:47 am »
The board as a whole is for people who eat at least a little raw animal food - only a small minority really eat only raw meats/organ-meats and nothing else - most include lots of raw meats/organ-meats in their diet  but also include some raw carbs(fruit, and to a lesser extent, raw veg). Most members on these kind of forums eat either mostly raw or all-raw.

If you look at all the palaeo evidence, you'll find that meat was at the very least the primary portion of the diet(plus some berries and similiar roughage, to a much lesser extent). That's one of the many reasons why Wrangham's idea re cooked-tubers supposedly being a major part of the Palaeo diet has been so soundly rejected by most palaeoanthrologists.

The Ice Man I think you're referring to was "Otzi" found in the Alps.He was from only 5,000 years ago, long (c.7,000 years) after  the Palaeolithic era ended. It was only in the Neolithic that seeds and grains and tubers etc. were eaten in large quantities.
Any man can make mistakes, but only an idiot persists in his error. Marcus Tullius Cicero

Offline iamdj

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #79 on: July 26, 2008, 05:42:18 am »
Thanks, everyone.

I find all of this fascinating.

I guess you'd have to call me a Neolithic eater, then. (not really 'cause I still cook my food)

None the less, I wish you all long and healthy journey. Congrats on you courage to go against the grain. Pun intended.

Dave

xylothrill

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #80 on: July 26, 2008, 08:46:01 am »

Although if he hasn't had any pH tests (which I would find hard to believe knowing Lex a little by now) then perhaps he should.

Lex's urinary pH is normal. See 2008 blood test in first post. Also, he experienced an increase in bone density when eating an even higher amount of protein than before this experiment, 32% of calories vs 20%. Studies that concluded that protein leads to bone loss were conducted with fractionated protein, not whole, raw animal protein with all of its fat soluble vitamins and cofactors that make minerals more bioavailable.

Craig 

Offline akaikumo

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #81 on: July 27, 2008, 08:58:54 am »
Lex, what do you usually eat? I know the ratio, but what are you eating to get the fat/protein?

I don't think I've seen what your meal plan looks like, but if you've written it already I'd appreciate it if someone would link me to the post.
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anais Nin

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #82 on: July 27, 2008, 09:05:28 am »
Lex, what do you usually eat? I know the ratio, but what are you eating to get the fat/protein?

I don't think I've seen what your meal plan looks like, but if you've written it already I'd appreciate it if someone would link me to the post.

http://www.rawpaleoforum.com/general-discussion/fat-ratio-experiment/msg1593/#msg1593

here you go  :)

xylothrill

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Re: Guests! Lex's Journal
« Reply #83 on: July 27, 2008, 09:53:44 am »
http://www.rawpaleoforum.com/general-discussion/fat-ratio-experiment/msg1593/#msg1593

here you go  :)

This reminds me... I've enabled the viewing of attachments by GUESTS and moderators (please don't ask)

Lex's attachments are in the first post of this thread and throughout.

Craig

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #84 on: July 27, 2008, 01:08:36 pm »
I didn't post yesterday as it was a very busy day with a lot of commitments.  I didn't even jog.  Just no time.  I had an early dental appointment at 7am for the dentist to replace a 40 year old 3-tooth bridge and the day just went down hill from there.  I knocked out a tooth when I was 12 years old when a dog chased me on my bicycle and in trying to fend him off I ran right smack dab into the back of a parked pick-up truck.  This was in the 1963.  I had a bridge put in 1969 when I turned 18.  I guess the glue finally gave up and I had to get a new one.

I want to thank everyone who posted in my absence and especially those that were able to answer some of the questions in my absence.  I do see a couple still hanging in the wind so to speak so forgive me as I attempt to address those.

could you please elaborate on muscle fuel? what are the conditions leading to & the results of the muscles using glucose, ketones, fatty acids?

On this one I'm a bit like Will Rodgers - "all I know is what I read in the newspapers" - and the truth is that you can probably get a much more detailed answer from Wikipedia or some of the better muscle building sites.  Speaking from the 20,000 foot view, the muscles can use glucose, fatty acids (FFA's) or ketones as fuel.  As we generally eat a high carb diet, our muscles have adapted to using glucose as their primary fuel source.  FFAs are just fat molecules as they've been broken down by digestion or from body fat.  This is the second easiest fuel for our muscles to use if glucose becomes scarce.  I think I read somewhere that people who run marathons quickly run out of glucose (stored as glycogen in the muscle tissue and liver) and for about 2/3s of the race their muscles switch over to burning FFAs.  The belief is that the switchover happens when they "hit the wall" and if they persist (and have trained long enough to teach their body to do this which can take months) and push through the wall the body switches to FFAs for the duration of the race - using FFAs released from the breakdown of body fat while they are running.  Finally the muscle cells can burn ketones which are a form of carbohydrate formed from FFA's in the liver.  It takes a good bit of doing to get the muscle cells to switch to ketones as their primary fuel as it takes both a significant increase in mitochondria in the cells as well as the manufacture of a specific enzyme to assist in the metabolism of the ketone bodies.  Since our normal modern diet is very high in carbs, the cells don't develop the extra mitochondria and the ability to make the enzyme goes dormant.  It can take several months to get everything back in production and when that happens, the muscles cells can no longer efficiently utilize glucose or FFA's.  At this point if we suddenly switch back to a high carb diet we will go through the same issues we faced converting to ketones as the body tears everything down and restructures to use Glucose and FFA's again - the whole thing is sort of a round robin catch-22. 

The switch from a glucose/FFA based muscle fuel to ketones (or visa versa) is a rather expensive proposition as far as the body is concerned and it will do everything possible to avoid the switch.  Even though we may eat no visible carbs, about 58% of all the protein we eat is converted to glucose and as long as we are eating enough protein to provide the minimum amount of glucose and FFA's the muscles won't switch to ketones even though they may be plentiful in our blood and/or urine.  Hope this helps.

There are a few things I recommend that you do before committing to your experiment long-term. ....First, I would read McDougall's Medicine: A Challenging Second Opinion

Hi Chery, I've actually called and talked with both Dr.John & Mary McDougall as well as Dr. Barry Sears one-on-one about their theories and how they came to their conclusions.  These are very intelligent individuals.  The problem is that their theories are just their interpretation of the data they've collected under the conditions that they've engineered. This journal is loaded with my theories based on the data I've collected under conditions that I've engineered.  Most all of this is just our best guess as to what we think is happening based on what little we know or can accurately measure. My own experience does not support either McDougall’s or Sear’s findings.  One major problem is that none of them has done a long term study of what happens when your remove carbohydrates from the diet. They all play it safe with making sure to recommend x% of fresh fruits and vegetables to meet the vitamin and mineral needs of the body. None of them has done a study where they eliminated all foods other than meat and fat.  I did this starting about 3 years ago.  My doctor warned me about all the deficiencies I'd face as well as the kidney issues, the acidic blood issue and on and on.  None of this has materialized in 3 years and my blood tests get better and better each year as do my vital signs.

Second, I recommend that you investigate the following items to see how your regimen is affecting them:

1. blood PH... amino acids and fatty acids, when consumed in excess, make the blood PH go down, and the body may dump calcium from the bones into the blood stream to compensate. Since leafy greens are rich in calcium, it might be vital to add them to help buffer your PH and spare your bones. Basically, by eating grass-fed meat, you are eating animals that did in fact have alkaline diet, bur you are inverting your PH by eating the animals rather than the leafy greens. I recommend a bone scan periodically too, to make sure you are not dissolving your vertebra and setting yourself up for crippling injuries or fractures.

How do you know this? Is it because a guru in current fashion declares so in his latest book?  How does he know?  The reason I'm so skeptical is that based on x-rays my bone density has increased over the last 5 years and more than 3 of those years have been meat and fat only.  Milk is supposed to be loaded with calcium, however, most of the people that I know with bone density issues are heavy consumers of dairy products - at their doctor’s insistence - yet their bones continue to deteriorate.  Greens measure rich in calcium when tested with reagents in the laboratory, the question becomes, is this calcium available to the body - or are there anti-nutrients that block its absorption.  What role does blood glucose and insulin play in the proper absorption of nutrients?  By the way, my bone integrity was confirmed by an orthopedist.  I broke my finger a little over a year ago (compound fracture).  It healed in record time and after 8 weeks when he normally puts people with my injury in therapy, he was amazed to find that I already had 90% movement back and the break was completely healed.

free radicals... long chain fatty acids of the saturated variety are not as bad as unsaturated in this respect, but basically any fat that is heated to cook it is damaged and will end up with dangling bonds. The dangles represent spare or missing electrons that can cause the cooked (broken-down) fatty acids to react with (glom on to) other molecules, causing them to also become reactive, resulting in long tangled chains or bursts of additional dangling bonds, and cross-linked proteins. Cross-linking causes connective tissue to become less flexible (hydrogenated oils are worst in this respect) and also can cross-link right into DNA, potentially activating growth genes that might start the cell reproducing uncontrollably in a tumor. This is basically a process of 'oxidation' or burning when these burnt fats get into your system and start reacting with your own cells, and anti-oxidants serve to terminate the long chains of free radicals by donating or accepting an electron without damaging a cell in the process. Again, leafy greens are rich in anti-oxidants. The animals you are eating had the benefit of the leafy green to protect them from cancer and connective tissue damage, but you do not.

Again I must ask how you can be so sure about what happens in the body related to the various fatty acids.  I eat my fats raw for the most part so what does that mean and how do you know?  The cross linking I've researched only happens in the presence of blood glucose and high insulin levels and again this is only a theory - no one really knows.  What makes you think that leafy greens will protect you from cancer and connective tissue damage.  I've seen this stated many times but I've found no research that supports it - and worse, books that reference studies that supposedly support it, when you actually read the study itself, you find that any link is tenuous at best and often missing altogether.

I just hope that your experiment is not causing you too much damage.

I assure you that some of the worst damage I've ever done to myself was to blindly follow the writings teachings of the latest diet gurus, and I've followed many of them.  I no longer do this.  I now do my own research, my own experiments, and when things aren't working I'm not afraid to take the exit and try another path. I get an annual physical and to be honest, at age 57, I'm in better shape than the 30 something doctor that performed my last physical.  Blood tests, vital signs, energy all have improved dramatically since early 2005 when I started this paleo adventure.

These extreme diets may produce all sorts of interesting effects, but just because some test results get 'better' does not necessarily mean that you are healthier. I encourage you to try reading many different sources and getting a more wholistic view of what you are doing to your body, just in case you are robbing Peter to pay Paul with your dietary changes rather than actually building equity in your health.

Who could I possibly read that would know anything about a totally zero carb diet?  I read constantly and this Journal is an effort to document the findings in Gary Taubes book Good Calories/Bad Calories.  Taubes admits he doesn't know but his research lead him to his conclusions.  I'm doing my best to test some of his insights and theories.  There is really no one else in the popular press doing stuff like this.  Stephen Phinney has done some work with athletes on Zero Carb diets and he disproved most of the myths you've repeated in your post.  Unfortunately, Phinney's work isn't in the best selling diet guru section of the local book store.

Skepticism is a rare quality to have, just remember to be skeptical of everything in equal measure so that your mind stays open to the possibility that you too are in error, and that there may be more to the picture than just doing the opposite of conventional wisdom to maximize health.

Believe me when I say that there is no one more skeptical than me.  I question everything and everyone.  I take nothing at face value and if I find something is not working I won't hesitate to change it.

Hmmm.. I remember reading something about futile cycles. It has something to do with the body getting rid of energy and increased heat is a result or side-effect. I can't recall the details or how it works though.

Dr Eades discussed futile cycles in his response to an e-mail asking about where all the calories consumed in a high fat diet go.  I read through this work and again it is just a theory.  It started as a possible theory to explain homeostasis - that the body will do useless work to create heat to keep our body temperatures at 98.6 deg.  Eades just extrapolated this idea and suggested that the body might be doing this same thing to use up all those extra calories we eat as fat.  It makes no sense to me.  Start with the original premise of the theory - that the body does useless work to keep body temperature constant.  Now take a simple observation (near and dear to my heart of late) that jogging a mile will raise my body temperature and cause me to break out into a sweat and yet all I've consumed is about 100 extra calories.  Many of us consume several thousand extra calories per day as part of our high fat diet.  Now if the body was burning 1,000s of extra calories per day in futile cycles (remember futile cycles keep the body warm) I figure I should be shriveled up, burned to a crisp, and glowing so hot you'd need sunglasses to look at my remains. 

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #85 on: July 27, 2008, 01:36:37 pm »
Lex, the way I understood the explanation of the burning of extra calories is that the body will work to use them, which results in heat production, not to keep the temperature constant but to use the calories. Constant body temperature is something the body does no matter what, and if you don't have enough calories to keep that up you are not long for this world. If you are running every day then I would surmise your body would have less extra calories to burn off with heat-producing busy work. Is this anywhere near your experience?

In other words, if you were to consume twice as many calories as you do now (force feed yourself) and lower your energy use (or simply not increase it) then your body would overwork certain systems to use up those calories more often, resulting in hot flash type symptoms.

Offline akaikumo

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Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #87 on: July 27, 2008, 01:48:50 pm »
I grabbed a snail from the garden as I headed out to help set my jogging pace.  Together we completed 3 full miles, and I'm proud to report that I won by a full length!  Ten minute miles as usual so nothing to write home about but going from nothing to 3 non-stop miles in a week and a half is better than I expected.  I really believe that I could have done 5 without much effort, but will probably keep it around 2-3 since I'm not trying to break any distance records.  I think the next step, is to follow Satya's suggestion and up the intensity rather than just add more and more of the same slow pace.  I'll keep it at 3 miles slow jog for next week just to make sure that I'm solid there and then maybe the following week jog the first 2 and do intervals on the last mile.  Now for intervals we're not talking 10 second 100 yard dash here.  Just picking up the pace from a 10 minute mile to maybe a 6 or 7 minute mile and hold it as long as I can - then walk until I've recovered enough to do it again, repeating as many times as I can in the 3rd mile.  Comments and suggestions welcome. 

BG rose again today.  It was 88 about 30 minutes after jogging (9am) and it is 105 now (10:30pm). 

Ketones are still at level 4+ but I did see a dip at one point in the day to level 3. Not sure if this was just a bad test strip or if it was a true drop.

BP was 111/54 about 3 minutes after jogging and dropped to 98/57 when I was resting later in the day.

One of the posts above was concerned about pH levels.  I do monitor urine pH and it is always acidic at between 5.0 and 5.5.  I looked up the medical evaluation from Steffansson's 1 year all meat diet and it showed that both Anderson and Steffannson's urine pH dropped to around 5.0 while eating only meat and fat.  My levels are consistent with these findings.  I have no way to find my actual blood pH so rely on my annual blood test which is posted in the first entry of this journal for that information.  It has been within normal range the last 2 times tested.

Lex

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #88 on: July 27, 2008, 02:22:02 pm »
Constant body temperature is something the body does no matter what, and if you don't have enough calories to keep that up you are not long for this world. If you are running every day then I would surmise your body would have less extra calories to burn off with heat-producing busy work. Is this anywhere near your experience?

In other words, if you were to consume twice as many calories as you do now (force feed yourself) and lower your energy use (or simply not increase it) then your body would overwork certain systems to use up those calories more often, resulting in hot flash type symptoms.

Hi Kyle,
My point was that the idea of futile cycles was initially proposed as an attempt to explain what the body does to maintain body temperature - it just does useless work that creates additional heat when needed.  The second point was that Dr. Eades extended this idea to suggest that futile cycles could also be used to explain how the body used up extra un-needed calories without storing them as fat.  My point is that if enough heat is created by burning an extra 10 calories per minute for 10 minutes (100 cal total) to raise my core temperature such that I break out into a sweat in an attempt to cool my body down, how could this possibly account for using up thousands of extra calories eaten in a high fat diet.  We'd all be dripping wet with sweat as our bodies desperately tried to keep cool.  I've also found that I tolerate both heat and cold much better than I did eating a high carb diet.  Yes, I often wake up warm at night and throw off any covers, but unlike a hot flash, I really don't need covers to start with and mostly put them on from habit.  So it appears that my metabolism is generating more heat, but it also seems to tolerate hot weather better also which seems a bit of a contradiction.  My wife's hot flashes on the other hand were intense in nature and rather short in duration.  You could also measure her body temp rise at these times.  Even though I feel warm my body temp stays stable.

Also, there's the problem that if futile cycles burn all these excess calories when eating a high fat diet then why isn't the same true when eating excess calories as carbs.  If futile cycles are part of the homeostasis loop then they must be called into play no matter what the fuel source is.

Just some random thoughts as I truly know nothing at all about this.  Its just that what I've been told didn't make sense to me and this may be because I'm only seeing a small fragment of the picture.  If there truly is documented existence of the futile cycle I'd love to read the research on it.  Until then I remain a bit skeptical.  The good thing about it is none of this depends on whether I believe it or not.  Whatever is happening will happen regardless of what I think or believe.  Kinda like gravity, you can insist that it doesn't exist, but it governs every physical movement you make whether you believe in it or not.  We are not given a choice when it comes to autonomous body functions - they just happen - and that's a good thing.

lex

coconinoz

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #89 on: July 28, 2008, 01:15:57 pm »
thanks so much for your explanation of muscle fuels, rex; really appreciate it -- looks like we people on this forum give you a great opportunity to exercise your finger muscles (run by glycogen, ketone, ffa or good will)

i've done a little reading on the subject, yet my level is still free weekly local paper whereas yours must be nyt or better...

1 thing that has caught my attention is that fast twitch muscle fibers (used in weight training & sprinting) are said to be fueled by their own glycogen or ketones; those ketones are generally supposed to be endogenous but i've speculated in the metabolism of lipids thread that they could also be dietary ketones
the slow twitch muscle fibers (endurance), on the other hand (or foot for that matter), are said to be fueled by ffa

so now my question is how a certain foodstyle could make it possible to optimize the enjoyment of both types of muscle fibers; i tend to think there must be a way to do it
i'd like to gather data from both what the experts say & what the paleo/raf eaters experience

incidentally, i read gary taubes' gcbc from a to z; his ch15 on hunger & exercise i found the weakest
now i want a book just like that but focused on raf & with a better ch15, of course


« Last Edit: July 28, 2008, 01:18:39 pm by coconinoz »

coconinoz

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #90 on: July 29, 2008, 11:31:46 am »
here's a couple of relevant links:

~ a somewhat detailed description of both muscle fuels -- glycogen/ketones vs ffa, i.e. carbs vs lipids -- based on the findings of many research projects
1 of his conclusions is that in 24 hr to several weeks after the exercise the effects of both types of fuel will even out
this is found in his article in 3 parts (& he also has another article on if, incidentally)
http://alanaragon.com/articles.html

~ a rather technical paper on the thrift genes/enzymes/hormones focused on the cycles of feast-famine & exercise-inactivity
http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/reprint/96/1/3

p.s.
myself, i think not only exercise & intermittent/fractal meal cycles but also exposure to outdoor (mountain or ocean) air, sun, tree shade, river/lake/ocean water or walking on grass/sand do make a difference -- for example, lying on the grass basking in the sun has similar effects as some exercise...


« Last Edit: July 29, 2008, 11:53:58 am by coconinoz »

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #91 on: July 29, 2008, 12:40:04 pm »
Hi Coconinoz,
I worry when people think I have a high level of knowledge of much of anything.  Most of what I write is just my thought process in trying to rectify what I am experiencing with what little I know.  For all practical purposes it is probably nonsense.  What I think sets me apart is that I'm willing to try things out for myself and document my findings along the way.  The measurements I publish (BG, BP, Heart Rate, Ketones, etc) are accurate.  My reasoning as to why they are what they are is mere speculation.  The real problem is that there is very little unbiased research being done so we are pretty much on our own if we decide to deviate from the status quo.

As for Gary Taubes, don't judge him to harshly.  Afterall he's a journalist not a researcher.  It is his willingness to buck the system and publish a book that doesn't tow the party line that may get others interested in actually doing useful formal research in a much neglected area.

Thanks for the links.  I'll try to read them tomorrow.

Lex

Offline lex_rooker

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #92 on: July 29, 2008, 01:00:23 pm »
Since I cheated and didn't jog on Friday I decided that I should at least make a show of it Sunday so I slogged out about 2.5 miles.  This morning I felt pretty good and had no trouble completing 3 miles at my usual slow pace.  I try to speed things along a bit now and then but quickly run out of steam and have to slow down - though I never actually stop and walk.  We'll see if I'm able to improve my performance over time.

My guess is that there are two things at work here, one I haven't really exercised for many years, and the other is diet.  As I remember from my running days in the 70s and 80s, it takes about 90 days for additional blood cells to mature once you start a regular exercise program and so I'll be interested to see if I have a significant improvement around the 3rd week in October.

BG was 91 before my jog today and dropped to 83 after the jog.  This is interesting as my BG would drop into the 60s during the first week I started jogging.  It has been slowly creeping back up to the same levels as it was before I started the increased activity.  Not sure what to make of this.

Ketones were off the chart at level 4+ as usual and I see no change in them after exercise.  I'm guessing that with my diet so high in fat, my body is discarding much of the extra energy by converting the excess FFAs into ketones so that they can be eliminated.  I've never read anything that described how the body could eliminate FFAs directly once they entered the blood stream, however, there is much written about ketones being eliminated through the kidneys and lungs.

With the 10 point drop in BG after jogging it seems my muscles are still using glucose even though I don't eat any carbs at all an protein is only about 100g per day.  The fact that overall glucose seems to be rising still has me wondering if I may be burning a significant amount of FFA's as muscle fuel and that the glucose created from the breakdown of the triglyceride is what is keeping it in the high 80s to mid 90s.

Lex

xylothrill

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #93 on: July 30, 2008, 12:09:29 am »
With the 10 point drop in BG after jogging it seems my muscles are still using glucose even though I don't eat any carbs at all an protein is only about 100g per day.  The fact that overall glucose seems to be rising still has me wondering if I may be burning a significant amount of FFA's as muscle fuel and that the glucose created from the breakdown of the triglyceride is what is keeping it in the high 80s to mid 90s.

Lex

Lex,

This time you sped things up until you had to slow down. As opposed to your last update, you were probably going anaerobic this time and were using glycogen stores. You're BG probably went down to replenish some of those stores. The glycerol molecule will be converted to glucose until your body's requirements are met. The rest will be recombined with fatty acids to reform TGs. I read this somewhere, GCBC perhaps? Charles also explained it very well on the livinlavidalowcarb forum before it got hacked. It stuck out in my mind because I couldn't figure out why my own serum TG didn't fall as quickly as I expected. They probably would have fallen more quickly had I been raw low-carb, keeping my body at the glucose burning threshold, vs zero carb. But, for me that would be like an alcoholic only drinking two drinks a day.   

Craig

Offline Daryl

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #94 on: July 30, 2008, 11:21:23 am »
I just noticed that this is the second most popular thread having 529 unique views - second only to a much older thread.
Not many people are posting in it but they sure are reading it!
I'm one of the "lurkers"  ;D I'm finding this absolutely fascinating!

Lex, thank you for charting all of this.

Offline Daryl

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #95 on: July 30, 2008, 07:17:29 pm »
I thought I read once that the ICE MAN, they found a few years back had a sack of seeds on him. I could be wrong.

That was Tommy Chong, I think.  :o

Offline Daryl

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #96 on: August 02, 2008, 10:54:58 am »
I hope I didn't kill the journal  ???

xylothrill

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #97 on: August 02, 2008, 11:37:38 am »
I hope I didn't kill the journal  ???

No, Daryl, you haven't killed his journal. Lex normally updates at least once a week and then spends some time replying to questions. He will get back, I assure you. He would never leave us hanging without an explanation.

Craig

xylothrill

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #98 on: August 02, 2008, 11:41:13 am »
I'm one of the "lurkers"  ;D I'm finding this absolutely fascinating!

Lex, thank you for charting all of this.

Sorry, I should have welcomed you! Welcome Daryl!
I'm glad you find this as fascinating as I do!

Craig

Offline Daryl

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Re: Lex's Journal
« Reply #99 on: August 02, 2008, 05:57:20 pm »
Sorry, I should have welcomed you! Welcome Daryl!
I'm glad you find this as fascinating as I do!

Craig
Thanks, Craig  ;D  It's like watching a scientist at work, on one of my favorite subjects.