Author Topic: Sully's Journal  (Read 75982 times)

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Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #75 on: July 15, 2010, 08:38:14 am »
HaHA. i CAN DEFINITLY RELATE. i got some scratches from thorns too. Mosquitoes are pretty bad here too.
It doesn't bother me much either. :)
Sully

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #76 on: July 23, 2010, 03:57:16 am »
Choke cherry



http://www.wildfoods.info/wildfoods/chokecherry.html

poisonous look alikes, know your stuff before you eat!
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Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #77 on: July 30, 2010, 08:44:47 am »
Got these today, I got a lot of time on my hands. At least until I start school this fall.





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Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #78 on: August 06, 2010, 06:16:30 am »
I am making a website about wild foods. It's through a helper website weebly and it is free.
:)

I really enjoy foraging and primitive hunting. Although the only hunting I have done is with a pellet gun. I might buy a slingshot soon. I like that more. I could use rocks.
http://wildfoods.weebly.com/
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Offline raw

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #79 on: August 06, 2010, 01:56:27 pm »
sully, i do get some wild cherries. when we eat wild, it's thousand times better than those farming food. i see your hand palm is very reddish, very good. your journal is very interesting indeed!
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Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #80 on: August 06, 2010, 02:05:05 pm »
Choke cherries? I guess my palm is red. IDK why. The exercise I do is kind of rough on the hands.
Sully

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #81 on: August 09, 2010, 02:48:16 am »
Wild Plum, not ripe yet but still got some pictures.






Description:  On average they are a half an inch to an inch in diameter and range in sizes. It's shape is usually circular but can be oblong. They grow on small trees ranging anywhere from 15-30 ft. There growth and ripeness can be monitored through their change in color. When they first appear they are green and eventually turn yellow. When they are yellow they soon get red blemishes. At this point you can take them home to complete their ripening. They are fully ripe when almost entirely red.
Sully

Offline Cinna

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #82 on: August 09, 2010, 09:31:27 pm »
Happy Birthday, Sully!!! I hope you have the most wonderful birthday ever. ;D

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #83 on: August 10, 2010, 12:47:56 am »
Thanks Cinna! Hopefully someone will get me a new heavy bag. My old ones are shredded.
Sully

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #84 on: August 20, 2010, 10:52:07 am »
Some Wild Fruits

Wild Plum




Wild Grape



Sully

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #85 on: August 20, 2010, 10:54:41 am »
Elderberry
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Offline djr_81

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #86 on: August 20, 2010, 06:58:36 pm »
I've been smelling the wild grapes in the woods now for the last week. They always smell so nice when ripe.
Definitely time to harvest here in the Northeast if anyone is so inclined. :)
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Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #87 on: September 07, 2010, 07:49:34 am »
Sully

Offline wodgina

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #88 on: September 07, 2010, 08:00:33 am »
haha that was great. Your a cool guy.
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Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #89 on: September 07, 2010, 08:25:30 am »
haha thanks :),

you can even just use a fan if anyone wants to try it, since my dehydrator is only on 95 degrees Fahrenheit
that's all it is pretty much, a fan

gives some chew to some soft ground meat :D
Sully

Offline raw

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #90 on: September 11, 2010, 02:06:22 pm »
Some Wild Fruits

Wild Plum




Wild Grape




other day, my little boy asks me "ma grapes! ma grapes" , i do not pay attention him and entire day long on and off he asks that. at last i've seen those very delicious wild grapes vines just right in my own home that my son is asking me. his eyes are everywhere in the jungle.

Sully, please, tell me how do i get that wild plum's tree? i want them in my country home to grow. all wild and exotic plants fascinate me.

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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #91 on: September 12, 2010, 04:45:44 am »
I have difficulty seeing fruits like those in trees because of my partial color blindness. The other day my nephews pointed to some apples in a tree and I had trouble seeing them even when they pointed them out. So if I lived in the wild I likely wouldn't be eating much fruit. LOL
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #92 on: September 12, 2010, 05:54:02 am »
Haha yeah, but then wouldn't it be hard to see animals. They are even more camouflaged. But i guess animals move. :)

What are the details of your color blindness? What colors do you have trouble seeing etc?
Sully

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #93 on: September 12, 2010, 06:10:51 am »
Haha yeah, but then wouldn't it be hard to see animals. They are even more camouflaged. But i guess animals move. :)
Correct, grassland animals move and their camouflaged colors tend to be dull camouflaged colors (I see yummy, yummy venison :D ), like you said, rather than brilliant fruity colors like shades of red. I can see dull browns and tans like in that image perfectly fine.

I've posted before (http://www.rawpaleoforum.com/carnivorous-zero-carb-approach/does-color-blindness-suggest-a-hunter-past/) about how scientists found that color blind people can actually seeing camouflaged animals better and spotting movement better (perhaps because we are less distracted by color?) and the scientists hypothesize that color blindness developed as an adaptation that aided in spotting game animals. There was only a need for one or two spotters in each group of hunters, so it didn't become a dominating mutation (besides, if all humans became color blind then the animals humans hunt most might develop hides with colorful shades of red and green, thus canceling the benefit of color blindness), but it was an important one. In hunter-gatherer days it was a help rather than a hindrance, whereas in today's agrarian and artificial society of things like traffic lights, it has become more of the latter and is even seen as a defect instead of a special capability.

Quote
What are the details of your color blindness? What colors do you have trouble seeing etc?
Based on the color blindness tests, I have trouble seeing most of the colors other than shades of brown, yellow, blue and gray/black (if you can call that a color), especially red and green, which are the most common colorblindness colors (and make spotting motionless red apples amongst green leaves very difficult and claims that fruits are essential seem dubious).

I would be able to spot the more-yellow and black fruits you posted above. The pink and reddish ones would be tough for me. I wonder if that means that fruits with those colors might be more healthful, though that's just wild speculation and the hunting benefits of colorblindness would probably be a much larger factor behind it than any theoretical superiority of yellow and black fruits over red.

If the scientists are right about color blindness, then it is a refutation of the vegetarian/vegan nonsense about humans being natural vegetarians, not that we needed any more proof.

Here's a good quote from the earlier thread: "There are some studies which conclude that color blind individuals are better at penetrating certain color camouflages and it has been suggested that this may be the evolutionary explanation for the surprisingly high frequency of congenital red-green colour blindness."
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #94 on: September 12, 2010, 06:32:39 am »
Haha NOT FAIR! :) That's a close up pic man! I spot animals well too. Hawks, owls, foxes, deer, squirrels etc. Most people don't see em often, it's all about how much your outside.

You may be right though. Aren't wolves color blind? Maybe that helps them see prey. It prob helps them concentrate on whatever moves.

Humans would see animals that aren't moving better than wolves. They have a good sense a smell and great hearing to help hunt.

We are mostly by site, but smell can help, or tracking, and our minds.

Many animals stay still during certain times of day. Imagine that deer lying down and keeping still many yards away.

I walked through the woods during the winter, and this deer was very still. A color blind dog would have walked right past (unless it smelled it). But it stuck out for me because I could differentiate the colors.

Imagine this a mile away. Very hard to see.

btw some wild grapes i got today


Sully

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #95 on: September 12, 2010, 06:42:36 am »
To think about it. Noise often alerts me of an animals location. Actually hearing something rustle alerted me of an animal postion most of the time. Then I locked on sight after hearing its location.

Color blindness, I think there are more cons than pros for humans at least. Are blood is red, to alert us.



 
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Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #96 on: September 12, 2010, 06:45:58 am »
Haha NOT FAIR! :) That's a close a pic man! I spot animals well too. Hawks, owls, foxes, deer, squirrels etc. Most people don't see em often, it's all about how much your outside.
Outdoor experience definitely helps, but the scientists claim that color blindness helps too.

Quote
You may be right though. Aren't wolves color blind? Maybe that helps them see prey. It prob helps them concentrate on whatever moves.
Interesting--I checked and you're right. I did not know that. It makes sense.

"Although little research has been done into a Wolf's ability to see color, it is believed that they may be partially color blind. Wolves have only red and blue photo receptors in their eyes, unlike humans, who have red, green, and blue photo receptors." http://www.runningwiththewolves.org/Anatomy.htm

Quote
Many animals stay still during certain times of day. Imagine that deer lying down and keeping still many yards away.
As I mentioned, color blindness provides an advantage in penetrating camouflage too, not just in seeing movement.

Quote
I walked through the woods during the winter, and this deer was very still. A color blind dog would have walked right past (unless it smelled it). But it stuck out for me because I could differentiate the colors.
Check out that image of a deer that I posted. Where do you see brilliant reds or greens on that deer or even the cat (which I can see perfectly fine, BTW, not that cats are particularly favorite game for humans to hunt)? Again, color blindness helps to see dull camouflaged colors better, not worse.

Are you maybe confusing red-green colorblindness with total colorblindness? As I mentioned, I can see shades of brown, yellow and blue fine. It would be the pink and reddish fruits amidst very green leaves that I would have trouble seeing, not brown deer in tan, yellow or dull green grass. Plus, as I also mentioned, according to the theory, not all hunters needed to be color blind--it was just particularly useful in the spotters.

I have other features that are also associated with the hunting peoples of northern latitudes, such as red hair, some green eye color (which might be all green if my mother and I had consumed a hunter diet from the date of my conception onwards, as multiple people have reported that their eyes become greener when they eat more animal foods like krill oil, particularly raw animal foods, it seems), light skin, larger-than-avg canines (my sister's are even more pronounced), long nasal passages (which are common in carnivores and improve the sense of smell; I can often smell things that others can't) and heavily "Celtic" ancestry. I have posted about all of this stuff (except the long nasal passages, which just occurred to me) before in multiple threads.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #97 on: September 12, 2010, 06:56:11 am »
Did you read my second post?
Sully

Offline Sully

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #98 on: September 12, 2010, 06:58:20 am »
Was thinking of shades of gray vision for dogs.

But I know what you mean, lack of other colors to concentrate on animal camo like brown etc..


Wolves see red? I told you, good to see red for our blood, and blood of animals.
Sully

Offline PaleoPhil

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Re: Sully's Journal
« Reply #99 on: September 12, 2010, 07:02:12 am »
Was thinking of shades of gray vision for dogs.

But I know what you mean, lack of other colors to concentrate on animal camo like brown etc..


Wolves see red? I told you, good to see red for our blood, are blood of animals.
You're just guessing and coming up with new guesses when I refute your old ones. I see you ignored the fact that wolves can't see green. I'm sorry, but I'm not at all convinced by your claim that red-green color blindness is a hindrance to hunting. Let me know if you come across evidence to support what you're saying.
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb