Author Topic: Rendered lamb fat  (Read 211 times)

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Offline hereandnow

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Rendered lamb fat
« on: January 13, 2018, 09:54:15 pm »
How bad is it, compared to raw, if rendered at a low temperature (120C) over 4-5 hours in an oven?

I have some raw lamb fat which I am finding unpalatable to eat in its raw state.

I guess I want to know if rendered fat is acceptable or a complete 'no-no' from a nutritional standpoint.

Also, in case someone has tips to make raw lamb fat (suet) palatable that would be greatly helpful to me.

Thank you.



Offline van

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2018, 11:24:00 pm »
run it through a meat grinder, and then place amounts to be eaten now in a bowl in a  cook pan of water with lid on it.   Heat the water to just where it begins to feel uncomfortable to your hand,, about 104 F.  Let it sit for about 20 minutes,,  the solids will begin to separate from liquid fat.  Both are tasty at his point. 

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2018, 01:30:52 am »
I personally have always hated the taste of raw suet, lamb suet or otherwise. Even worse, it seems to, soon after, give me yellow diarrhea of sorts, giving the impression that  my body does not want to absorb it.I therefore look for other kinds of raw fat such as raw brain, raw marrow and raw fat on muscle-meat. I always loved the taste of raw white fat on leg of lamb, though always hated the taste of raw white fat on beef etc. Admittedly, raw  legs of lamb from New Zealand tend to have it all cut off, so buy from farmers' markets or direct from farms.

Generally speaking, 104F/40C is the max one should heat anything to, if you want to avoid the heat-derived toxins etc.
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Offline hereandnow

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2018, 02:53:30 am »
run it through a meat grinder, and then place amounts to be eaten now in a bowl in a  cook pan of water with lid on it.   Heat the water to just where it begins to feel uncomfortable to your hand,, about 104 F.  Let it sit for about 20 minutes,,  the solids will begin to separate from liquid fat.  Both are tasty at his point. 

Thanks Van. Would rendering the fat be significantly inferior (nutritionally speaking) compared to the method described by you above?

Offline hereandnow

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2018, 03:05:22 am »
I personally have always hated the taste of raw suet, lamb suet or otherwise. Even worse, it seems to, soon after, give me yellow diarrhea of sorts, giving the impression that  my body does not want to absorb it.I therefore look for other kinds of raw fat such as raw brain, raw marrow and raw fat on muscle-meat. I always loved the taste of raw white fat on leg of lamb, though always hated the taste of raw white fat on beef etc. Admittedly, raw  legs of lamb from New Zealand tend to have it all cut off, so buy from farmers' markets or direct from farms.

Generally speaking, 104F/40C is the max one should heat anything to, if you want to avoid the heat-derived toxins etc.

Thanks TylerDurden. Given these heat limits, rendering the fat may not be the best approach.

I also love the raw fat on leg of lamb.

I have a couple of follow-up questions:
How well, according to you, does a raw leg of lamb (with the fat on) do as far as protein-to-fat ratios are concerned?
Is raw brain all fat? How does it taste? Does one have to consider any special factors while eating raw brain as compared to eating other parts of the animal?

Thank you for your time.

Offline van

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2018, 04:02:26 am »
most if not all of us here are raw, and wouldn't consider typical rendering, due to believed damages to the fat.  Obviously millions have done it for thousands of years though. 
   Yes, look for back fat and not suet.

Offline hereandnow

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2018, 05:33:55 am »
most if not all of us here are raw, and wouldn't consider typical rendering, due to believed damages to the fat.  Obviously millions have done it for thousands of years though. 
   Yes, look for back fat and not suet.

Is back fat more palatable? Thanks.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2018, 07:09:34 am »
Thanks TylerDurden. Given these heat limits, rendering the fat may not be the best approach.

I also love the raw fat on leg of lamb.

I have a couple of follow-up questions:
How well, according to you, does a raw leg of lamb (with the fat on) do as far as protein-to-fat ratios are concerned?
Is raw brain all fat? How does it taste? Does one have to consider any special factors while eating raw brain as compared to eating other parts of the animal?

Thank you for your time.

Raw brain is, apparently, at least 60% fat. It, admittedly, does not taste much, it's rather bland in fact. For tasty fat, I look for raw tongue, raw fatty fish like swordfish and the (wet version of) raw marrow. No need for extra preparations. I get raw pig's brain from the local supermarket. Since it's not 100% pastured pork, I don't eat it that often, though.

No idea re fat/protein ratios as regards raw lamb. I  also eat some raw carbs, not being raw, zero-carb, so do not worry much re such ratios.It always seemed more than fatty enough for me. Mind you, the farmer in question did not cut off most of the white fat, like they do in the supermarkets. When buying raw, grassfed meat, I always wince when the butcher automatically starts cutting off the white fat.

In recent times, I have been regretting my past criticisms of raw, zero-carb diets  re my own experiments with RZC. In those days, I was under the impression that one could go RZC(all-raw)-animal-food diet as long as the protein/fat ratios were properly maintained. What I think I failed to grasp was that the amount of protein also needed to be greatly reduced as well. Maybe I should experiment with RZC again  after the latest water-fasting I'm doing.
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Offline Eric

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Re: Rendered lamb fat
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2018, 07:58:59 am »
The taste and texture of animal fat changes substantially over the course of the year. I've found that suet tastes quite good when the animal is slaughtered in the summer after it's been eating the first fresh, green grass of the season for a couple months. Suet from cattle slaughtered at this time, around late June or early July, has the taste and consistency of fine butter. But as the season progresses, and as cattle (or other ruminants) are forced to eat drier and drier forage, their fat becomes dominated by longer chain fatty acids and it becomes more waxy and crumbly. It still tastes good, at least to me, but I'm not fond of the texture. So when I buy suet, I focus specifically on getting fat from animals slaughtered in June or very early July. Once they've left that window, I do not buy their suet.

Back fat is generally of better consistency, though I can't say that I notice a difference in taste. Back fat is often, but not always, less crumbly or waxy than suet is. So back fat from an animal slaughtered in August might still be okay.

Another thing you might do if you want to eat raw fat but it's not palatable when you eat it by itself is to chop it up finely, or send it through a meat grinder, and mix it in with meat of some sort. You can turn this mixture into tartare, or another recipe. Finely chopped suet mixed with raw honey is quite nice too, although it's obviously sweet. The high fat concentration seems to balance out the excess sugar.
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