Author Topic: Blue Cheese Anyone?  (Read 5200 times)

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Offline goodsamaritan

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Blue Cheese Anyone?
« on: May 30, 2012, 09:10:23 pm »
The first time I made high meat, for me it tasted like blue cheese.

Any primal dieter into blue cheese?

Is blue cheese raw or not?

Is blue cheese alive with stuff in it?  Gorgonzola, etc. ?

Is blue cheese good or not?
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Offline RawZi

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone?
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2012, 10:19:24 pm »
    Blue cheese should be raw.  It's very salty though. I've only had it here in America.  Unfortunately they often pasteurize it here. I think they grow it with penicillin, that's the blue. No? My highmeat does not taste the same.
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Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone?
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2012, 01:37:51 am »
Stilton is raw, blue cheese. It tastes very good. I also find that "high-meat" tastes very much like raw, aged cheese.
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Offline goodsamaritan

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone? - THERMISED cow's milk?
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2014, 10:56:50 am »
I chanced upon a blue cheese brand Emborg Danablu and the ingredients say THERMISED cow's milk.

Apparently this is a kind of very quick thing not as harmful as pasteurization.

"Thermisation (US: Thermization), is the heat treatment of raw (unpasturised) milk to reduce number of micro-organisms, usually for the purpose of cheesemaking. It is a less severe treatment than pasturisation. Thermised (US: Thermized) milk is raw milk that has been heated for at least 15 seconds at a temperature between 57 degrees C and 68 degrees C."

https://www.cookipedia.co.uk/recipes_wiki/Thermised_%28milk%29

Please share your experiences with THERMISED milk or in this blue cheese or any raw blue cheese...
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Offline Inger

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone?
« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2014, 03:01:37 am »
I never eat thermised cheese... it is not raw... and lack the benefits of a real raw aged cheese.. like Roquefort.  Why not buy Roquefort? It is 100% raw.. and so very delicious... t is about the only cheese I eat.. and I do it seldom.. but sometimes I do crave it and then I buy it... and eat the whole piece like an ice cream... I only buy me 150-200 gram because of that...lol

Offline eveheart

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone?
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2014, 03:21:29 am »
Apparently this is a kind of very quick thing not as harmful as pasteurization.

"Thermisation (US: Thermization), is the heat treatment of raw (unpasturised) milk to reduce number of micro-organisms, usually for the purpose of cheesemaking. It is a less severe treatment than pasturisation. Thermised (US: Thermized) milk is raw milk that has been heated for at least 15 seconds at a temperature between 57 degrees C and 68 degrees C."

Reducing the number of micro-organisms in milk prior to cheese making is done for the convenience of the cheese maker who is using manufactured cultures. If the milk has none of its own micro-organisms (bacteria, yeasts), then the resulting cheese is very uniform from batch to batch. Heating the milk to  temperatures below pasteurization may optimize the process for the cheese maker and make the milk slightly less "cooked" tasting, but if the goal is raw, thermization is out of the question. I think of it like taking a 15 second bath in 50 - 68 C water... Comfy?

Before they made up this silly word - thermizing - homemakers used to call it scalding the milk.
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Offline goodsamaritan

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone?
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2014, 08:36:30 am »
Wow, thanks ladies!

Scalding!

Will look for Roquefort cheese.
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Offline ivanrk

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone?
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2018, 06:56:00 am »
Stilton is raw, blue cheese. It tastes very good. I also find that "high-meat" tastes very much like raw, aged cheese.

The whole point of making high meat in my understanding is to make bacteria predigest meat to amino acids - the same is with aged cheeses thats why the taste is the same. But blue cheese is too salty and not very aged - i think to be closer to high meat the cheese should be aged at least 1 year or better 2 years - it should be very hard even crumbly like real parmeggiano reggiano or very matured cheddar.

Offline dair

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Re: Blue Cheese Anyone?
« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2018, 03:12:59 pm »
I remember many years ago, before going raw/fruitarian/salt-free, I sort of liked blue cheese. I tried it again a couple of month ago, it was a very good quality cheese, and raw,  but I wanted to spit out my first bite, so disgusting with all that salt, really disgusting.