Author Topic: Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol  (Read 2612 times)

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Offline NuclearKnight

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Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol
« on: April 15, 2016, 12:07:43 pm »
I like mashing ripe fruit in a jar and waiting until it becomes bubbly, fizzy, and foamy. They often smell alcoholic but instead taste pleasantly sour. Not once have I became drunk. Might there be friendly yeast that aid in metabolism that are missing in conventionally scorched alcohol?



Offline dariorpl

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Re: Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2016, 07:29:51 pm »
As I understand it, wine (and therefore also wine vinegar) is produced by stirring the mixture very frequently. That encourages yeast to form. Yeast are tiny organisms that won't be disturbed by stirring. Mold on the other hand likes to form large structures that get broken up when you stir. Therefore, if you don't stir, you get mold rather than yeast, and mold doesn't seem to produce the same alcohols that yeast does. And it creates a particular taste of it's own, which most people don't like in their wine, so they avoid it by stirring the mixture.
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Offline ciervo-chaman

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Re: Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2016, 06:17:51 am »
I do like to make that too!

Plums are great tasting and acid mmmm!! Yum

What fruits have you tried and tasted best?

Offline dair

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Re: Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2017, 11:59:38 pm »
First a little note about vinegar... I have heard that actually you need a mushroom to make real vinegar (a bit like kombucha). I once forgot an apple cider vinegar for more than one year in a hot place, there was on the surface, a mushroom...
I also have heard some crazy stories that if you want real vinegar, you need the help of some flies, who will land on the surface of the liquid with dirty feet, and these have bacteria (the ones on their feet), that are necessary to make real vinegar.
One can only imagine where those feet have been...

Offline dair

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Re: Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2017, 12:10:03 am »
Found this explanation on a fermentation forum:

Re: fruit flies
Postby music on Fri Nov 08, 2013 9:01 am

Fruit fly carry acetobacter on their feet, the bacillus that will create a vinegar mother. Let them be for a while, then filter them out. Once they have created the mother, there is no further use for them, exclude them if you can, but they'll do no real harm. If you want to make vinegar from beer or wine, invite the fruit flies in for a party.

Offline Apani

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Re: Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2017, 03:07:13 am »
As I understand it, wine (and therefore also wine vinegar) is produced by stirring the mixture very frequently. That encourages yeast to form. Yeast are tiny organisms that won't be disturbed by stirring. Mold on the other hand likes to form large structures that get broken up when you stir. Therefore, if you don't stir, you get mold rather than yeast, and mold doesn't seem to produce the same alcohols that yeast does. And it creates a particular taste of it's own, which most people don't like in their wine, so they avoid it by stirring the mixture.

Huh. I've been making "mead" at home by mixing honey and water and I did notice small white bodies which would disappear upon stirring.

Offline dair

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Re: Rotten fruit alcohol versus conventional alcohol
« Reply #6 on: Today at 02:38:40 am »
If you live in a hot climate, fermentation occurs easily: in Asia I would get ripe mangos ripen some more, and then, they would become real soft and would have this fizzy, slightly sour taste, really delicious. Waiting too long is a bad idea, as the acidic taste would take over and the fruit taste disappear. Durian can also work, if it us just slightly fermented. I would get an energy boost of these kinds of fruits.