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Members' Journals => Journals => Topic started by: sabertooth on August 07, 2013, 04:51:16 am

Title: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 07, 2013, 04:51:16 am
“When the student is ready the butcher will appear”

 The old fashion trade butchering is a dying art, being replaced by the assembly line and factory farming methods. There are still places to be found in the heartland of Kentucky where people produce and harvest their meat animals in a more traditional fashion. I have found a teacher who has been butchering since he was 7 years old and he is going to teach me all the skills in the trade. Perhaps I can use this thread to share some of what I learn on the way.

While driving out to slaughter a cow, we started talking about how humans are the ultimate predators. I was surprised how learned this old country butcher actually is. He begins to explain to me how it is actually best to eat meat raw, because in the raw state meat contains enzymes that enable it to be digested, and by cooking meat the body is taxed by having to produce more of its own enzymes.

We work out of an old military vehicle that has a home made crane with a wench attached to it. The set up is very nice and the work is fairly easy. From the time he drops the cow till it is skinned, gutted, quartered and put into a tank takes less than an hour. Then back at the shop we salt the hides and load the quarters into the refrigerator to hang.

I just got finished trimming out a whole beef, spent most of today learning about how to make all the cuts, and use all the equipment.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on August 07, 2013, 05:54:00 am
Definitely tell us more.  I'm very interested.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: eveheart on August 07, 2013, 10:33:16 pm
I'll be reading every word you write on this thread. I watch a lot of youtube videos on butchering. I hope you can make a video, too.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on August 07, 2013, 10:49:03 pm
that's a sweet job saber! 

we had some folks come out to kill some piggies and they had the same set up, old truck with a crane to hang and drain and clean em out, then on to a little metal table to skin, then hung in a fridge truck and sent to the butcher.

really the only way to learn all of that is hands on so its great that youre getting a paid education. 

its also great your boss know whats up with meat.  I can tell you that very few ranchers and butchers have batted an eye when I tell them I eat meat raw, most dont care, understand, have done it themselves or have had relatives who occasionally chow raw meats.  really eye opening.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: goodsamaritan on August 07, 2013, 10:59:01 pm
Witnessing your career change here... priceless!
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on August 08, 2013, 06:03:14 am


  I can tell you that very few ranchers and butchers have batted an eye when I tell them I eat meat raw, most dont care, understand, have done it themselves or have had relatives who occasionally chow raw meats.  really eye opening.

that is very interesting. It doesn't surprise me too much, though.  People generally become more relaxed around things they are very familiar with.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 08, 2013, 08:09:24 am
There is a hidden backwoods sub culture of raw meat eaters in many parts of the world.

When my boss started out working at the slaughter house all the old guys there would drink blood, as a remedy for a hang over. He said one day after a night of drinking he drank a big cup, and within minutes he started feeling much better. He will also eat some raw meats while butchering, but from habit will always sear his steaks.

He told me about why the Indians use smoke houses, to dry the meat, not to cook it. Traditional smoke houses would not get hot enough to cook meat. The purpose of the smoke was to keep insects away while the meat dried. I am going to build a smoke shack soon and start experimenting with ways to dry age meats.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: goodsamaritan on August 08, 2013, 08:53:37 am
Maybe screen technology these days will keep the insects away instead of smoke?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on August 08, 2013, 09:12:18 am
I would think the smoke and the heat created by the fire would help to lower the humidity and help the drying process, in addiction to keeping away insects.  I cant tell you how dry a house heated with a wood stove can get in the middle of a wet winter...they really evaporate moisture well.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: goodsamaritan on August 08, 2013, 09:36:53 am
In our city, the beef slaughter house butcher does the killing and the quartering.

In our wet markets we have 2 more types of butchers who process the quarters.

1. the "stripper" cuts it up in big chunks. (they usually have no personality)

2. the show / salesman butcher. - they call out to customers, smile, befriend, haggle and do their showmanship cutting up the beef exactly according to the specifications of the customers.  They even give recipe advice.

-----------

When it comes to pigs, the pigs are slaughtered in the slaughterhouse.

The stripper cuts up the pig in large parts.

And the retail showman salesman does his thing.

-----------

You could be the all of the above.  With your pole dancing training, you could flex your muscles and smile as the retail showman and have the ladies lining up to buy from you.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on August 08, 2013, 11:36:51 am
most food is precut and packaged here for convenience and storing.  there are butcher shops in very nice grocery stores that do high quality foods including grass fed meats, but those are usually only in very populated towns, but I don't think hot ladies every really line up at the butcher shop, maybe only in some very special communities.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 10, 2013, 01:04:41 am
Maybe screen technology these days will keep the insects away instead of smoke?

Thats what I was thinking to do. line the inside with screen and run a fan to dry age,

The Indians originally didn't even use smoke houses they just hung their meat on primative racks close enough to a fire for the heat to help it dry a little faster and  the smoke to keep the bugs away

most food is precut and packaged here for convenience and storing.  there are butcher shops in very nice grocery stores that do high quality foods including grass fed meats, but those are usually only in very populated towns, but I don't think hot ladies every really line up at the butcher shop, maybe only in some very special communities.



My boss was explaining how 90 percent of the work we do has to do with aesthetics. We turn a whole beef into different cuts of steaks, roast, stew meat and burger. Then his wife and this cute girl run the store front and keep the different cuts of meat all well presented in a deli case.

Got to dress out the first grassfed cow the other day. It was a big one , its dress weight was over 1000 pounds and its been hanging for 10 days. It was absolutely delicious. I got to graze on it all day, and ended up taking home 40 pounds of fat trimmings 40 pounds of suet, and 4 pounds of scrap meat I scavenged. Had to leave about 100 pounds of fat in the trash because I don't have room in my freezer for it(its a damn shame, he says we can't sell it because its done for local farmers and hasn't been properly inspected) But I can take what I want home for DOG FOOD.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on August 10, 2013, 02:51:33 am
I'm using these as reference
Part 1 - How to bone a hind quarter of beef demonstration by Master Butcher Michael Cross (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dMKziF0pNvw#ws)
Part 2 - How to bone a hind quarter of beef demonstration by Master Butcher Michael Cross (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-89ls7srE0#ws)
Part 3 - How to bone a hind quarter of beef demonstration by Master Butcher Michael Cross (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXTHKXgXATs#ws)

If you have any tips that would be great.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on August 10, 2013, 05:49:42 am
That's awesome, Sabertooth.  Your job IS your food source.  ROFL  Gotta love it.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 21, 2013, 05:44:40 am
I have been witnessing first hand the negative effects of grain finishing beef.

Some farmers will use feeding troughs full of brewers grains and corn in order to fatten them quickly and cheaply. The feed smells awful and makes cows get morbidly fat, but since they are slaughtered by the time they are 30 months old, much of the negative effects don't reach the surface.
http://www.citizen-times.com/article/20130324/BUSINESS/303240024/From-brew-moo-Cattle-feed-spent-grain-from-breweries (http://www.citizen-times.com/article/20130324/BUSINESS/303240024/From-brew-moo-Cattle-feed-spent-grain-from-breweries)

I slaughtered a twenty month old Angus the other day , fattened on brewers grains, that's knees were swollen with fluid, an early sign of arthritis. This cant be healthy, even if its not GMO

The breeding stock is usually kept on pasture and only the young animals that are to be slaughtered are given large amounts of grains. In this way farms can still keep a healthy breeding population, but most of the conventionally raised animals that are fattened for slaughter, would not be fit to eat by Raw Paleo Standards.

At least not every animal we process is grain fed, there is a wild bull that's been raised on pasture that we are going to hunt down in a couple of weeks, and a 3 year old pasture cow a week after that.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on August 21, 2013, 06:11:42 am
That's interesting, that they keep the breeding stock on pasture. 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 21, 2013, 07:36:33 am
Its more than interesting, its absolutely imperative they do so.

My boss has pointed out to me that, Already there are increasing rates of infertility, as well are pelvic bone deformities in conventionally raised cattle, , and if the breeding stock were not allowed on pasture and instead fed a diet of hay, supplemented GMO grains, and protein mixes of god knows what; that would render a large percentage of the animals infertile within a few generations.

Now the farmers we service are actually using more ethical methods compared to the majority of animal producers, in as much as that most of them avoid the use of antibiotics and hormones,

Many feed lot producers will buy pasture born calfs and then began to administer the special treatment.

Its totally  unsustainable to raise breeding stock by the same methods they finish out animals destined for human consumption. Animals who are to be fattened up by CONVENTIONAL methods become so sick and unbalanced that they would soon succumb to disease and die before they would be able to breed healthy offspring. 

My main point is that the majority people in america are eating these feed lot animals and the hormones , antibiotics , and GMOs that are proven to cause severe issues in the breeding stock of farm animals are being ingested by the breeding stock of humanity.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: PaleoPhil on August 21, 2013, 08:52:57 am
It's the same story with bees too, and all other species. The queen bees that are raised near-wild, without being fed any HFCS crap, are the heartiest, and are much sought after by beekeepers throughout the US.

Sabertooth, you rightly point out that humans are eating mostly crap and are degenerating as a result. We are the only species in history which embraces its own destruction and willingly accelerates it.

Humans, the first suicidal species. Not even lemmings were this foolish.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 22, 2013, 08:29:26 am
To the credit of our species and the will to survive inherent in all whom are truly alive, there are those among us who still retain remnants of our primal drives, as well as the intelligence by which to plot out an alternative courses of action.

We must not be carried away by the suicidal compulsion of the fallen masses of our species,
We must diverge from the mainstream and blaze a new trail away from the ruins of a post neolithic world.
Take whoever will come with us, and leave the rest to fend for themselves.

It is in our nature to follow the call of the wild which beckons certain members of a species at critical times to schism from the main branches of the evolutionary tree, as it has done with all former breeds of hominids who came before us.

If these grandiose, big picture, machinations hold elements of truth, and the ways of modern man are inevitably leading up to an evolutionary cull-de- sac,  where our descendants are doomed to flounder in a post humanistic genetic decay; then I put my hope in the notion that there must be those among us who are instinctively intact beings of great spirit that are willing and able to alter course and re wild the species.

Big picture aside, I think there is much we can do as individuals to prevent the insane methods of modern food production from harming those around us. Save whom ever you can, by getting educated and spreading the word through the grass fed roots. Try having fun along the way.


 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 23, 2013, 09:08:04 am
I helped slaughter a steer last week with a broken front leg, after skinning it I seen that the leg was covered in a yellow viscous liquid. My boss said it was pus, full of healing antibodies. He also told me that when wounds are like that you have to throw out the liver because it always tastes  foul.

Later today we tried to salvage what meat we could from the leg. What was really odd was that the meat throughout the animal had a different texture and was dark and purplish. The smell was very odd, and the yellow puss ran through the other joints of the animal. The healing process altered the composition of the entire animal.

I tried a piece and it had a weird after taste, and since it was one of those brewer grain finished monsters I decided it wasn't fit to eat, even if it was technically safe.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Dr. D on August 23, 2013, 10:13:17 am
The same thing happened with my roadkill deer. Everything tasted odd and was purple. The dogs didn't mind though.

I was wondering what the yellow pus was also. Thanks.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 27, 2013, 01:12:58 am
I went out to Russel Springs to get a Sheep. The lady is really eccentric, but one soon gets use to eccentric farmers. Animal lover, tree huggers often take much better care of their animals than farmer Bob who sells to the local slaughter house.  If you want an animal that has been raised on pasture without the use of GMO feeds and drugs, you have to deal with far out people.

The lady's husband was sent out to help me pick out one, I told him to let me have the fattest one of the bunch and soon found a nice ram. While on the road home he called , saying that he gave me the wrong one, his wife was screaming in the background" I told him to take the one with the horns".

So I turned around and before I could get very far she called and told me to keep him then hung up on me.

Then while almost home the husband calls back and ask me if the one I got was a male. "Yes; he has balls". He explained that the  other males were all castrated and destined to be culled, but the one I picked was intact and to be put out to stud. He was real cool about everything and we joked about how his wife was going to cut off his balls for giving away the wrong sheep.

Finding this out made me a little sad in a way. Going out to farms and taking sheep that are set aside to cull, in order to thin out a flock is a humane and decent way to harvest meat. Most male sheep that are not separated or castrated go nuts and kill the other males, so they need to be culled. But the one I picked was destined for a life of luxury, and at least a couple of years living as a stud in his prime. So as I prepared it for slaughter I cant help but feel sorry for robbing the poor boy of his destiny.

He will live on in me and together we will carry on life's purpose. For this purpose I am grateful and pay great respect to the spirit of the ram for its sacrifice.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on August 27, 2013, 11:31:50 am
I just processed 56lb one-year old.  Without head and organs it came about 22lb.  There was almost no fat.  I told the guy not to bring so young anymore.  He gets it from Amish in Indiana-Illinois border.  The good thing it was all green in the stomach. No traces of grains.

Here is my question.  How do you cut through the spine to get 2 halves for lamb chops?  I don't have band saw.  Just hack saw and knives.  Cut with hack saw as close to the spine as possible from both sides?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on August 28, 2013, 03:53:11 am
these two things popped up on my facebook feed and seemed pertinent...I didn't watch the video as I think they may have filmed a slaughter, and I don't think that an animals death should ever be filmed or photographed, like..the actual point of death, I think its disrespectful.

but it thought this was a good quote.....kind of eerie and makes me think how bad our lack of experience in basic natural survival has so changed how we perceive things, like our whole basis of society is based on the same moral judgment that is pretty unique to mankind....and just that we are a weird ass species

"I have come to the conclusion, after decades of living with animals, that dying is not painful, only the fear of death is. How does modern slaughtering work? Animals are transported over long distances, crowded in confined spaces and when they arrive at the slaughterhouse they can smell blood, fear, and death, never mind hear the screaming of the other animals. Just look them in the eyes and you know what fear of death is. This is unnecessary and unacceptable. Humane slaughter takes a little more time, but we owe it to animals. The most important thing for the animal is not to be stressed or in pain. The product will also be healthier. Humane butchering happens locally, where the animal has lived, without transportation. An animal is best killed by the human it feels most close to." -Sepp Holzer

The Good Slaughter: A Proud Meat Cutter Shares His Story | food.curated. | Reserve Channel (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3pq5MWLZyII#ws)

Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 28, 2013, 05:05:55 am
I just processed 56lb one-year old.  Without head and organs it came about 22lb.  There was almost no fat.  I told the guy not to bring so young anymore.  He gets it from Amish in Indiana-Illinois border.  The good thing it was all green in the stomach. No traces of grains.

Here is my question.  How do you cut through the spine to get 2 halves for lamb chops?  I don't have band saw.  Just hack saw and knives.  Cut with hack saw as close to the spine as possible from both sides?

We have a 1600 dollar hand held electric bone saw that we split animals with, my boss said he use to have to hand saw through the spine.

A hack saw would work, or perhaps an electric saw saw, if you cant get an actual butchers saw.

these two things popped up on my facebook feed and seemed pertinent...I didn't watch the video as I think they may have filmed a slaughter, and I don't think that an animals death should ever be filmed or photographed, like..the actual point of death, I think its disrespectful.


Why should it be disrespectful, the animal isn't even aware of being filmed. Its no worse than national geographic filming a lion hunt.

There are many ways to ensure a quick and painless death, and I agree that it is better to use humane methods when slaughtering.
Not only is it the moral thing to do, but if you let an animal get stressed and suffer it actually builds up a bitter taste in its meat from all the lactic acid and adrenalin released in the struggle.

True story believe it or not...
My boss once told me of a the time when a farmer he slaughtered for found a huge field of marijuana someone was growing on his land. He didn't want to turn it in to the authorities because they would come in and make a mess of his other crops, so he cut it into hay and fed it to his cows. When my boss was called over to slaughter a cow he saw about 20 cows just standing around chewing their cud as calm as can be. He ask the farmer to separate the other cows so he wouldn't frighten them. The farmer told him not to bother because they were all to stoned to care.

He shot the one dead, and usually other cows will scatter and move out of the way when one is dropped with a 22, but he said these cows didn't blink an eye, they were so mellow and relaxed that they wouldn't leave and crowded around so that it was hard for him to pull the thing out to skin it.

In conclusion
So why not finish out animals on a blend of hay and cannabis. Getting an animal stoned must make it easier to handle and would cause less pain and suffering when it comes time to slaughter.

Think how tender and flavorful a marijuana finished cow would taste.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on August 28, 2013, 05:16:04 am
Was interviewed by a couch-surfing reporter from Australia the other day. He took a bunch of pictures and recorded about 45 minuets of conversation regarding the Raw Paleo Diet.

He just emailed me back
Hi Derek,

Julian here from Vice Magazine. Thanks for sharing your story with me and letting me take some photos. It was a really interesting night.

So I submitted the story to my editor and he loved it. He wanted to know if you'd be interested it being in a short documentary for our website. I mentioned that you'd done another segment for a TV channel and he wanted to know more about it. So a) would you be interested in another short news piece? And b) what was the show you were on and when was it broadcast? Could you send me the link? And were you contractually bound to them in any way?

Thanks again Derek!

Regards,
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on August 28, 2013, 05:48:05 am
There are marijuana finished pigs in Oregon or Washington state, I forget, I'll find the article and post it later.  I'd do it.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 08, 2013, 08:13:24 am
Holy sheep shit, look what I just found.

(http://i.imgur.com/wcS60wO.jpg) (http://imgur.com/wcS60wO)


The sheep I just butchered is infested with tapeworms, what should I do?
Should I tell the farmer? If I do, they might give them chemical wormers and that may pose a greater risk to the quality of the animal. At least with the worms I know that its paleo quality.

This is the third sheep I got from the farm so I am sure I have already eaten two animals that were also infected. I take no precautions with avoiding the entrails , so I probably have been exposed years ago. It worries me, that I may be infected and not even know, and the worms could be slowly growing and robbing me of my vitality. The only reason I found them is because I was experimenting with washing out the intestines with a hose, and they were flushed out.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on September 08, 2013, 08:42:00 am
what was the health of the sheep with these worms? do you feel like you lack vitality?
take an herbal wormer if you are worried but if you aren't wasting away or feeling bad I wouldn't worry to much.  take better care to avoid the entrails or at least the poop
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: van on September 08, 2013, 11:01:32 am
You might want to go on line and see how it can be transmitted to humans, and in what form,, cysts, or eggs, or segments...   I do think sheep/lambs have more parasites than cows. 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: TylerDurden on September 08, 2013, 03:07:06 pm
*sigh*, just take an anti-parasite drug such as praziquantel(?) and you`ll be fine. Tapeworms are anyway rather harmless, it`s only an unaesthetic problem if they come out of your arse in vast amounts, thus complicating the vacating of your bowels.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 10, 2013, 12:15:41 am
I Haven't noticed any worm segments in my stool, though I still don't see how it is possible I don't have a tapeworm infection, having eating dozens of infected animals, I must have picked up a few along the way...

Tyler did you have any other symptoms, besides passing out worm segments? Did the medication cause any side effects?

 I have noticed for some time I feel a little lethargic and have issues with loss of appetite, and other vague symptoms of not feeling optimal, but nothing stands out as telltale signs, and even if I do have a parasite, there is no telling exactly what it could be.

Herbal remedies are often noxious and somewhat unreliable, and I don't just want to take a medication until I am sure. Nor do I have the resources or trust in the establishment for reliable medical testing.

I am considering trying diatomaceous earth for about a month and keeping an eye on my stool for eliminated worm segments. Animal worming sites claim that just using a little daily is all that is required to deworm.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on September 10, 2013, 01:43:41 am
Let us know what happens if you try the diatomaceous earth. 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 10, 2013, 01:53:45 am
 I ordered some last night, should be in next week.

My girlfriend knows a woman who does high colonics, the women herself has suffered from parisites in the past and has found worms in others while doing procedures; she is a poop expert that can tell by looking at stool samples, if there are other issues such as poor absorption, candida, etc.

So the plan is to take DE daily for a week then get a colonic.

I'll give a report on it in about two week.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on September 10, 2013, 04:34:03 am
OK.  I'll be interested to hear how it goes.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: TylerDurden on September 10, 2013, 06:03:00 am

Tyler did you have any other symptoms, besides passing out worm segments? Did the medication cause any side effects?

  No, the medication had absolutely  no side-effects.  The tapeworms gave me an additional very painful pain in the bladder region which made me find it painful to also urinate. That, however, lasted only c.3 days before vanishing, and  tapeworms are well-known to be symptom-free most of the time.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: van on September 10, 2013, 06:44:54 am
Years ago when I came back from India with some 'friends' I tried DE,, and then switched over, can't remember the results.  BUT,  I do have reservations about DE.   Under a microscope it appears like broken glass, or so I've read.  If someone doesn't have a thick mucous coating on their intestines, small and large, I am not convinced it doesn't possible get into a fold and cause irritation.  You might try brushing your teeth or really gums with it, and look for abrasion or irritation.  I've read where the tape worm ingests it and it tears up their insides or even crawling around in it can abrade them to death.     And yes,  I too would like to know what you find out.   thanks,  Van
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on September 10, 2013, 09:28:16 am
Where in the sheep did you find it???

Tapeworms should not be in sheep.  Only cysts.  Adult tapeworm should only be found in carnivores (humans included).

Maybe these are some kind of other worms??
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on September 10, 2013, 09:42:42 am
Ok, I see it, in the intestines.

These look like Moniezia expansa which has a different life cycle than beef tapeworm.

It appears meat is safe for consumption.  You should not be infected unless meat is contaminated with feces. I would not worry.  I bet you have none of it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moniezia_expansa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moniezia_expansa)
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 10, 2013, 10:10:06 am
 Moniezia expansa seems to be the culprit. The sheep was totally pasture raised and taste wonderful, the liver is about the best I have tasted, so Im not worried about eating the animal. I just wonder if I should bother telling the farmer, I don't want to eat an animal if its just been wormed..

http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Moniezia_expansa/ (http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Moniezia_expansa/)

Which is a relief, because it apparently needs to incubate inside of a dirt mite before it becomes infectious, so even if I was exposed to its eggs, I would not get infected.

I'm going to take D.E for a week and get a colonic anyway. It seems like it would be harmless, and if I dont flush out any worms at least I will have peace of mind and a clean colon.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on September 10, 2013, 10:54:53 am
I think it is normal for sheep to have those.  I would not tell farmer anything if sheep looks otherwise healthy.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on September 11, 2013, 03:38:26 am
I was working on sheep's neck and dug out these 2 things.

My guess the small oval is the thyroid.  What about the other one?  They were next to each other.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 11, 2013, 05:45:44 am
The larger gland is the thyroid, its also referred to as sweet breads.

The smaller gland looks like a lymph node
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 11, 2013, 05:54:02 am
Bow season opened up so I got to butcher 4 deer today. I salvaged the femur bones for marrow and some buck fat.
Its feasible for me to start using deer marrow as a primary fat source for the next couple of months.

Im curious about whether to limit how much of the spinal cord and brain I consume?
Kentucky is not on the CWD list, but I still worry.

Also my boss is looking for part time deer season help, so if anyone would be interested in coming to Kentucky to butcher for two weeks?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: LePatron7 on September 11, 2013, 07:36:47 am
Im curious about whether to limit how much of the spinal cord and brain I consume?
Kentucky is not on the CWD list, but I still worry.

I noticed eating a lot of brain a while back that I got diarrhea. I'm sure the quality of the food was fine. But I think the excess cholesterol was to much for me. Brain is very high in cholesterol, even by our standards of eating mainly animal foods. 1 serving of brain (aprox. 4 oz) can have upwards of 800% cholesterol.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 11, 2013, 08:21:02 am
(http://i.imgur.com/gVsm8md.jpg) (http://imgur.com/gVsm8md)

I ran off the road the other day if you look closely you can see my passenger in the back seat unharmed.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on September 11, 2013, 08:49:19 am
is there a better way to skin so that the amount of hair left on carcass is limited?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 11, 2013, 09:23:29 am
A lamb skinner knife works good. Its a small knife with a curved blade.

There are basic a few techniques that will keep the meat clean.
Maybe you tube around for detailed instruction

keep a bucket of hot water and use it to wipe away dirt and hair on an as needed basis

The chest of the sheep are difficult to skin you kind of just have to carve it away from the breastplate.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on September 11, 2013, 09:48:33 am
sabertooth, did the tow truck driver say anything about your passenger?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 12, 2013, 05:16:27 am
No. I called the guy who sold me the sheep and he pulled me out with his truck.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 12, 2013, 06:50:05 am
(http://i.imgur.com/MU6Bv4h.jpg) (http://imgur.com/MU6Bv4h)

Stabbed myself today while cutting the tendon of a pig leg. Its a deep puncture wound that hurts like hell.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: PaleoPhil on September 12, 2013, 09:11:29 am
Flaxseed meal poultice might help--such as boil some flaxseed meal, soak a clean rag in it, let it cool, put it on the wound and tie it up with an ace bandage and wear it overnight. It helped my father when a nail went clear through his foot.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on September 12, 2013, 09:27:56 am
Put some raw honey on it. I was wondering about the odds of cutting yourself while doing that. Does your butcher boss ever cut himself?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 12, 2013, 09:42:04 am
Its happens to even the best butchers. They all have stories of being cut and stabbed.

My boss when he was 19 ran a 4 inch knife right into his gut while boning out a hind quarter. It missed his liver by an inch. He said he was in a hurry so that he could get ready for a first date. She had to meet him in the hospital, and they have been together ever since.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on September 12, 2013, 10:39:56 am
Stay safe, dude.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on September 12, 2013, 10:41:40 am
Flaxseed meal poultice might help--such as boil some flaxseed meal, soak a clean rag in it, let it cool, put it on the wound and tie it up with an ace bandage and wear it overnight. It helped my father when a nail went clear through his foot.

I've used boiled flaxseed oil (people call it linseed, but it's the same stuff) on wood plenty of times, but never knew boiled flax could be used as a poultice.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on September 12, 2013, 11:56:35 am
Last time I had a deep puncture wounds that wasn't stitch able I flushed it out with alcohol and then used some honey that I had put cayenne pepper in to infuse and put that on there and just held my hand closed for like two weeks, but I guess you could just lightly cover it.  if it doesn't stop bleeding you can use bentonite clay, but you don't really want a serious scab over it til it heal up inside, so just keep it cleanish by rinsing it if it gets too grubby but don't worry to  much.  I almost stabbed through a hand with all types of dirt and goat shit all over it, the rancher next door, an old paramedic, told me to wash my damn hands and then decided it was too deep to stitch, he was down with honey and bentonite, but it hink yours may be too deep for the clay until it heals internally a little, cant really tell from the photos.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: LePatron7 on September 12, 2013, 12:06:57 pm
My boss when he was 19 ran a 4 inch knife right into his gut while boning out a hind quarter. It missed his liver by an inch. He said he was in a hurry so that he could get ready for a first date. She had to meet him in the hospital, and they have been together ever since.

Romantic <3 lol
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 18, 2013, 08:49:04 am
Culled a cow with a rectal prolapse the other day. While skinning her my boss pointed out a big patch of scared tissue, when he said she was given a shot at one time. They vaccinate cows in the neck that is used for burger now so that scar tissue isn't found in peoples rump roast.

Which leads me to the issue of vaccines, sure you may be eating grass fed but how many of you eat animals that are getting pumped full of Genetically modified viral DNA injections? Do you Know for sure?

Got to work on a sterioded beef today. I was telling my boss how the meat had a clay like consistency. He told that it was most likely due to steroids put in the feed. It was weird how when it was ground into burger that it seemed to hold in all its moisture. Steroids cause the tissue to have a clay like   absorbency. 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on September 18, 2013, 09:00:56 am
My farmer friend from Equador, he is a native and lives in the rural indian farming villages down there, he had a scar from the vaccinations he and all of the kids in the village were given.  They all had these horrible scars from the vaccinations.

You have to know who's raising our animals.  Many are raising animals "holistically" without the use of vaccinations.  But you have to know.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: RogueFarmer on September 19, 2013, 12:22:10 pm
I am certainly not an expert but i may have researched more information on worms than anyone here so my two cents. i think the only parasite to really worry about in ruminants is liver fluke. not even sure we can get it from eating the meat. you can get it from snails, their eggs i think even their slime trail. so you could easily get it even from washed lettuce.    pig shit might even be able to kill you. at least it can cause permanent cysts in the muscles and the brain. do not ingest pig or human shit especially. canine, bear, pig, coon, rat...               

Normally cow, goat and sheep shit is fairly safe to eat. a sick animals shit may get you sick with a bad bacteria or perhaps even coccideosis a tiny parasite that is usually always present but mostly only harmful at heavy infestation levels. humans I believe can get lungworm and heartworm but i am pretty sure we don`t share the same species of those worms with ruminants. in an analogy to cars, it's like there are several makes of worms but most are by necessity specialized in a few different species so there is a different model for different animals. sheep and goats share many but cows share few with either of them. horses and pigs share none. different species are literally used sometimes by necessity to clean grasslands of parasite infestations.

If a cow eats a sheep parasite the parasite dies and visa versa. but it gets more confusing. one school of thought is that you should alternate pastures of species to keep a cleaner pasture. however studies show that when multi species grazing with cows and sheep together, the sheep have higher worm loads than in the former method yet actually grow faster than either rotating cows and sheep or by only raising sheep. this shows that cows somehow make sheep grow faster in multiple ways yet to be proven.                                 

Colonic might not worn very well at all on worms, even tape worms. tape worms are not harmful usually. worms in general are mostly harmless unless you are in a poor state of nutrition or immunity or your loaded with them. you wouldn't be loaded with them if you were not any of those first. it is probably important to ingest too many though as even healthy stock can take a hit from them. but how healthy are they? animals have actually been bred to be intolerant of them through the constant use of worm medication. now a days the parasites have become so resistant that the chemical worners barely work.                                       

How to prevent infestation in livestock? rotate pastures to allow rest, heat and dry make life in the pasture hard for worms. employ ducks, chickens and turkeys. they scratch up dung piles, making them dry out faster making them a more poor place for them to live and actually ingest a great deal of them. use herbs and poisonous plants and high tannin plants and high copper plants. birds foot treefoil, chicory, willow and poplar are supposed to help and are good every day feeds. garlic, ginger, oregano all are good tonics that kill worms. black walnut hulls and wormwood are the main herbal worm nukes. as i said also plants high in copper, saint john's wort, heliotrope work wonders  which leads me to perhaps the most important info i have to give today                               

Copper is thought of as the mineral throw switch of parasites. having a high copper blood level exiles them from the body. my secret weapon is what they use to turn pools blue. copper sulfate is one of the few chemicals my animals ever eat. it is poison and can destroy the liver. it is safe in small batches the liver can handle. somehow mixing it with calcium makes it safe, or at least dolomite does. i try to mix it with as many minerals as possible and also offer the minerals without copper. they eat more without the copper but eat the copper too. they usually know how much they need. rarely i drop a bunch in the mouth of a reluctant eater.

The best prevention is copper in the plants and a high level of nutrition. most pastures are sewn and even sprayed to prevent weeds and a lot of soil in humid climates and everywhere is low on copper. low copper is a factor in mad cow and likely human mental diseases. it also cures foot rot, ring worm, lice the shits often... they use it in fish only aquariums to kill parasites. plants, coral, crabs, starfish, octopus cannot handle it.      hope this helps                     
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on September 19, 2013, 01:05:18 pm
Interesting stuff, RogueFarmer.  You might want to break up long posts like that into paragraphs.  It's kind of hard for people who don't already know the subject to read a big block of text like that.

That's interesting about the chickens/ducks being mixed with cows to help reduce parasites. That sounds like a Joel Salatin trick.  Is it?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: RogueFarmer on September 19, 2013, 08:36:30 pm
i thought i did. bell phone does not allow for paragraph spacing it would seem. i got no problem with someone editing it for me ha! i cant at the moment. yes it is a joel salatin trick to follow cows with chickens. based of corse on natures model. i have parasitic cow birds in my pasture. not sure what exactly they eat but it seems they eat flies and peck at the cow pies. they have cow birds down south that are a type of egret that actually perch on the cows. in the ocean there are cleaner fish and shrimp that other fish make pit stops at coral reefs to get parasites cleaned off. even letting the little fish and shrimps to swim into their mouth and gills to remove them. dogs have an acid bath for to kill bacteria and parasites. aajonus said we make just as much hydrochloric acid but more in the small intestine. so do we have to be more careful? probably. the people who really ought to worry about them are those without a good source of protein, minerals and vitamins.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on September 19, 2013, 09:15:17 pm
High copper is also a factor in human mental health, or perhaps its only high copper in relation to low zinc.....but I do like the suggestion of letting them browse on saint johns wart, its called Klamath weed out here and considered an invasive species.  Wish I would have gathered much  more seed then I did, I also wish I woulda been more careful around bear, pig, and snail poop, I am pretty sure I have ingested all three.  Thanks for the info Rogue.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 20, 2013, 06:47:43 am
I don't think I have any worms, I am fairly convinced that weakness, lethargy, and low platelets are do to a reemergence of the blood parasites, I contracted years before doing any raw paleo.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 20, 2013, 07:31:11 am
(http://i.imgur.com/klrrAfr.jpg) (http://imgur.com/klrrAfr)
 This cow was 33 months, pasture raised and was as healthy as can be.

Federal regulations make us cut out the head and spine of animals 30 months or older, as precaution against mad cow.
Which is ludicrous.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on September 21, 2013, 10:53:06 pm
I finally got to the beef front leg and not too sure what's the best way to handle it.

Usually it is cut into shanks with bone in the middle using band saw.  Shanks is one of the toughest cuts and usually destined for slow cookers.

So I separated major muscles and as you can see there a lot of connective tissue.   These in turn contain smaller bundles of muscles and more connective tissue.  It is time consuming to get the toughest connective tissue out.  I can't get rid of all connective tissue in reasonable amount of time.

So how do you guys handle legs?

 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Iguana on September 21, 2013, 11:43:13 pm
Whole, like this in the lower part of the fridge:

Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on September 21, 2013, 11:46:24 pm
I think as the connective tissue ages it get brittle/dry and easier to chew through, i generally swallow whats left after i have chewed all the meat off.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Iguana on September 21, 2013, 11:52:06 pm
Yes, they do once they are like that! But you can eat it before as well... ;D And sometimes, a good knife helps  ;)


Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on September 23, 2013, 08:20:05 am
I finally got to the beef front leg and not too sure what's the best way to handle it.

Usually it is cut into shanks with bone in the middle using band saw.  Shanks is one of the toughest cuts and usually destined for slow cookers.

Iguana, that's a nice looking leg, How long as it been aging?

So I separated major muscles and as you can see there a lot of connective tissue.   These in turn contain smaller bundles of muscles and more connective tissue.  It is time consuming to get the toughest connective tissue out.  I can't get rid of all connective tissue in reasonable amount of time.

So how do you guys handle legs?

 

Yeah I just let the legs hang in he fridge and cut of what I need for feeding time.

Iguana, that's a good looking leg, How long has it been aging?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Iguana on September 23, 2013, 03:23:47 pm
2 months or perhaps a little more, I think.

Did you get my e-mail?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on October 15, 2013, 07:12:07 am
This might explain the arthritic conditions of the beef cows. 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/21/214202886/inside-the-beef-industrys-battle-over-growth-promotion-drugs (http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/08/21/214202886/inside-the-beef-industrys-battle-over-growth-promotion-drugs)
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on October 23, 2013, 09:15:17 am
I was laid off from the butcher shop today.

I think the owner is a little paranoid about German reporters calling him for permission to film.

Oh well its for the best, they weren't paying me well and I wasn't planning on staying there very long anyway.

Its nothing to be sad about, tomorrow I am going to apply to a large grass fed processing plant. Its run by the man who let us film the RTL segment at his facility. He even cut off some samples for me to eat raw on camera, and gave me a cows head.

Wish me luck, if all goes well I will be making much more money and have access to all the scraps from grass fed cows I could possibly want.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: PaleoPhil on October 23, 2013, 09:44:52 am
good luck ST
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: van on October 23, 2013, 09:54:50 am
yeah, good luck.  How about going out on your own?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: PaleoPhil on October 23, 2013, 10:01:28 am
It's interesting that German reporters are interested in you. Do you have any idea why it would turn out to be Germans vs. others? I know Germany has a long history of interest in special diets like vegetarianism and natural living. I wonder if it might be more than just coincidence.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on October 23, 2013, 10:34:57 am


It's interesting that German reporters are interested in you. Do you have any idea why it would turn out to be Germans vs. others? I know Germany has a long history of interest in special diets like vegetarianism and natural living. I wonder if it might be more than just coincidence.

Well Phil, its a convoluted story. The network RTL is under constant pressure to produce interesting story's that have an edge, and there are some characters within the network who want to push the limits of what they are allowed to show. They did a report on vampires a while back, and the higher ups tried to censor the drinking of human blood on camera.

So when the producer saw my bloody teeth in the vice article, she got the idea that animal blood would be acceptable, and since a Raw meat eater story has yet to be covered, they decided to go with it.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on October 23, 2013, 11:01:37 am
Good luck getting the new job, Saber. 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on October 26, 2013, 01:49:58 pm
I just got delivery of 220lb fore and hind quarters from Amish farms.  I paid $3.6/lb.

I think it was a little too young.  Not a lot of fat.  Unfortunately I have no space to hang it long term so I have to freeze it.  I took out as much as I can fit in my fridge to dry and the rest will go into freezer.

It took me about 1h - 1.25h to chop it up like this.  I'm getting a little faster every time.  The hardest part is memorizing location and position of the joints.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on November 01, 2013, 09:50:31 am
I participated in the butchering of 1200 birds, 50 hogs, 50 sheep, and 30 cows in three days. The butcher is back in business

This is where I need to be for sure. The plant is USDA inspected and I've spent the last two days with the inspector learning how to trim out the animals before putting them into the cooler. She has 20 years experience, is very meticulous and skilled at what she does. She has seen it all and now she is training me on what to look for as markers of health in the animals.

She doesn't know about my diet at all and when I was trimming out a lamb she ask me if I ever tried any. "Sure I like lamb" I said.

 Then she said to me and I quote
"I have even eaten it Raw".

If that isn't a sign from above.......................
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on November 01, 2013, 11:44:33 am
What do they do with organs?

USDA butcher let me take only liver, kidney, heart, and tongue.   And he put his stupid stamp on liver and heart, i had to cut stamped area out.
Did not allow me to take anything else, no lungs, no spleen, no head, nothing else.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Inger on November 01, 2013, 04:14:17 pm
Oh man ST.... priceless...! Please tell us, if you have time, what are the markers of health in an animal to look after! We have lambs too, slaughter them our self (my brothers do it) and chickens and I really have not much knowledge about these things.

I sometimes find weird stuff in the raw beef fat I eat... like some cysts? I wonder if they are not good to eat. I think I ate one tiny piece of something in my fat yesterday that tasted a bit weird.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Haai on November 01, 2013, 04:41:09 pm
I sometimes find weird stuff in the raw beef fat I eat... like some cysts? I wonder if they are not good to eat. I think I ate one tiny piece of something in my fat yesterday that tasted a bit weird.

I also sometimes see these cyst-like things in my beef fat. I am also not sure what they are. However, I noticed that in lamb legs there is always one in the same place every time, surrounded by fat. So I guess that particular one is not an abnormality. Maybe it is a gland of some sort, or a lymph node, I really don't know.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on November 01, 2013, 10:24:07 pm
I also think they are lymph nodes.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: LePatron7 on November 02, 2013, 05:41:44 am
I've seen the same thing in my beef fat. It's red, and circular. I always thought it was an artery or something. The ducks in my area love the stuff. When I have parts of the beef fat I don't want I throw it out to them.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on November 05, 2013, 05:26:23 am
What do they do with organs?

USDA butcher let me take only liver, kidney, heart, and tongue.   And he put his stupid stamp on liver and heart, i had to cut stamped area out.
Did not allow me to take anything else, no lungs, no spleen, no head, nothing else.

They keep the liver, tongue kidney, and hearts, and throw everything else out into the scrap barrels, to be rendered into dog food, cosmetics, ect.

The nodules embedded in the fat are lymph nodes, at least that's what the inspector told me they were.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on November 05, 2013, 05:36:43 am
New question?

I went into the whole foods today and one of the managers recognized me from the article and told me how they would soon have an opening for a meat cutter. The whole store knows who I am, having been a regular for some time I have made friends with some of the people there. It would be a good work environment, and they offer meat cutters 14 dollars an hour.

I am only making 9 where I am at now, and would only be likely to get up to 11 per hour for the first year. The work is also extremely demanding and physically hard labor for relatively low pay.

The problem is I would like to learn more at the plant before moving on. I have the opportunity to become an expert slaughterer, inspector, and meat cutter where I am at now, but If I stay,  I may miss out on the opportunity to make a living wage at a much better job.

Should I stay or should I go? 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: TylerDurden on November 05, 2013, 06:02:35 am
Go, money is everything, sadly.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on November 05, 2013, 07:12:43 am
I worked for whole foods for 5 years.  You do make good money, but the corporate shenanigans that go on behind the scenes were pretty intense and way too much for me to handle.

It really depends on who you work with though.  A lot of people really make working at WF their whole lives, many relationships and high school hierarchical type antics, but your store and department may be a little different then that.  You make the most profit share in the meat department, you could easily make more then $14 an hour, plus they offer some really good health bene's that you may be able to use for things like massage. 

I don't know, I'd stay with the local guys and just work up to a better paying job and forgo having to delve into the anus of big corperations.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Eric on November 05, 2013, 09:25:16 am
Quote
...and forgo having to delve into the anus of big corperations.

I love that statement. I think that's worthy of becoming a T-shirt... Sorry to sidetrack the thread.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on November 05, 2013, 11:18:31 am
You can always work a side job for extra money, Saber.  If you like the people you are working with, and you are getting valuable work experience, I'd stay there.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on November 05, 2013, 09:45:11 pm
Opps yeah, I forgot to add that I really think you should stay where you can get the best education.  That way, if things were to pan out and you had your own farm, perhaps you could also do the butchering yourself.  Just think of the experience as added value.  The only thing you will learn at WFM is customer service, how to negotiate the corporate sphere, and truly how easy it is to become complacent when you think you are being well compensated.   
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on November 06, 2013, 05:29:28 am


I don't know, I'd stay with the local guys and just work up to a better paying job and forgo having to delve into the anus of big corporations.

I just delved into the anus of 2000 chickens and 100 turkeys, using an ass vac to detach the rectum. A valuable experience indeed.

There is so much to consider when making this decision.

I have this desire to learn everything about the meat business, so that one day I may be able to run my own business, supplying the skyrocketing demand for paleo quality food.

I desperately need a higher paying job right now, so I am tempted to take the job at whole foods, and put away my dreams for more money today.
Though I can see how the corporate work environment can be a trap that will prevent me from personal growth. Not to mention with all those troublesome Whole foods Girls around I might get caught up in some kind of drama.

I can stay where I am at and do some side work on my own, but then I will have very little personal time or freedom?

Damn this is a tough decision.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: van on November 06, 2013, 06:57:24 am
My guess is that you're a hard worker, that you deliver on what they pay you and more.  Have you thought about simply asking for what you want where you're at?    Chances are your boss couldn't replace you or the level of work that you offer them.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on November 06, 2013, 08:53:22 pm
I just delved into the anus of 2000 chickens and 100 turkeys, using an ass vac to detach the rectum. A valuable experience indeed.


haha, all in one day? those butt sucking machines must really make the process go quickly.  do you use one of those defeathering machines as well?  it took about 6 hours to clean 6 chickens and two turkeys by dunking them in hot water and then defeathering by hand as well as cleaning by hand.  we also collected a ton of the feathers for use for some native American ceremonial garb so it was kind of more tedious.

do you think that you might just take some time to make the decision?  i would be hesitant to jump right into the whole foods thing, like i said, the wage is just what makes you complacent with not really educating yourself of becoming self sustaining.  always know that there will be many more opportunities, just think of all the change you have experienced recently!  saying yes or no is never a permanent finalization on opportunities.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on November 06, 2013, 10:35:13 pm
Saber, could you work part-time at Whole Foods, just to make a little extra cash?  You could always go full-time later.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Iguana on November 07, 2013, 12:49:08 am
it took about 6 hours to clean 6 chickens and two turkeys by dunking them in hot water and then defeathering by hand as well as cleaning by hand. 
To eat them raw, we don't do it that way : we skin them off and the feathers come out along with the skin.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: jessica on November 07, 2013, 05:20:46 am
To eat them raw, we don't do it that way : we skin them off and the feathers come out along with the skin.

unfortunately my work and life aren't exactly congruent.  but I do get free raw organs.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: goodsamaritan on November 07, 2013, 06:13:43 am
Check out this chicken plucking machine.

The Chicken Plucker Machine (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8W0B74WT3s#ws)
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on November 14, 2013, 10:53:53 pm
http://www.lex18.com/news/ram-on-the-run-during-lexington-s-rush-hour/ (http://www.lex18.com/news/ram-on-the-run-during-lexington-s-rush-hour/)
The Ram that got away :(
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on November 15, 2013, 08:15:46 am
http://www.lex18.com/news/ram-on-the-run-during-lexington-s-rush-hour/ (http://www.lex18.com/news/ram-on-the-run-during-lexington-s-rush-hour/)
The Ram that got away :(

Was that one you were planning on slaughtering? 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on November 15, 2013, 09:56:03 am
I plead the 5th.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on November 15, 2013, 12:51:27 pm
You have brightened my day. 

Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: goodsamaritan on November 15, 2013, 02:27:16 pm
Why did the police have to kill the ram? 
That doesn't sound logical.
Is it because they were too lazy to catch it or call the city pound?
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: ys on November 16, 2013, 02:42:22 am
Quote
Why did the police have to kill the ram?

Don't even ask.  It's a liability issue.  It's the land of lawyers here. 
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on November 16, 2013, 03:44:26 am
Where have all the cowboys gone?

Its sad to live in city where the local police working with animal control cant even corral a sheep.

What a waste, it would of sustained me a month, if I didn't already owe a bunch of fines I might of tried to come forward to claim it, luckily the production crew reimbursed me for the loss and bought me another one.

http://www.lex18.com/videos/ram-runs-loose-along-new-circle-road/ (http://www.lex18.com/videos/ram-runs-loose-along-new-circle-road/)
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: cherimoya_kid on November 16, 2013, 11:55:49 am
Is your Great Ram Escape going to be part of the show about you?  ROFL
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: RogueFarmer on December 04, 2013, 05:35:57 am
Yeah, a couple years ago in Ohio there was a guy who supposedly turned all his animals loose and the police killed him and shot almost all of his animals with bullets, which included 10+ wolves, 10+ lions, 10+ tigers, 10+ bears and a bunch of others. Why do police have tasers instead of tranquilizer guns?  Why were none of the animals captured humanely? Makes me think we don't get the real story because the man was not still around to defend himself and the cops were able to spin it any which way but loose.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Eric on December 04, 2013, 06:35:57 am
Quote
Yeah, a couple years ago in Ohio there was a guy who supposedly turned all his animals loose and the police killed him and shot almost all of his animals...

Not exactly an accurate retelling of the story. The man was deep in debt and marital problems and opened the cages of his exotic animals just before he committed suicide with a .357 Magnum. Read more about the story here (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/11/05/ohio-man-who-freed-exotic-pets-was-deep-in-debt/), or search for other reports which seem to tell a similar story. I originally heard about this from a friend who used to work at an exotic animal rescue center in Indiana, next door to Ohio.

Large, potentially dangerous animals aren't exactly the easiest thing to capture live or find secondary homes for, so I completely understand why the police felt the need to shoot and kill most them. The story I linked to tells what the responding officers encountered when they responded to the farmhand's call.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: RogueFarmer on January 10, 2014, 05:44:20 am
Not exactly an accurate retelling of the story. The man was deep in debt and marital problems and opened the cages of his exotic animals just before he committed suicide with a .357 Magnum. Read more about the story here (http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/11/05/ohio-man-who-freed-exotic-pets-was-deep-in-debt/), or search for other reports which seem to tell a similar story. I originally heard about this from a friend who used to work at an exotic animal rescue center in Indiana, next door to Ohio.

Large, potentially dangerous animals aren't exactly the easiest thing to capture live or find secondary homes for, so I completely understand why the police felt the need to shoot and kill most them. The story I linked to tells what the responding officers encountered when they responded to the farmhand's call.


Who isn't in debt? And I call total BS to your statement. Tranquilizer guns work.

Why were the cops the first on the scene, no calling for animal control? Why was he talking to a depute four days earlier?

Why wouldn't the guy think about his wife? She fought the police department and eventually all of the living animals were returned to her.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: TylerDurden on January 10, 2014, 04:58:08 pm
it is absolutely unforgiveable to shoot dead wild animals simply on the vague claim that they might be dangerous. Tranquillizer guns should be used instead, I quite agree. There was a nasty incident recently  where a very young snow leopard  escaped from an austrian zoo and was immediately shot dead by a warden.  There simply has to be a law which debunks the whole notion that one can kill wild animals on the vague, stupid assumption that they are always dangerous to humans.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: andvanwyk on January 30, 2014, 07:50:59 pm
Sabertooth, thanks for your insightful views and very interesting posts! I have enjoyed reading through most of them (and on other topics).

Recently I got a butcher to get me some raw beef thyroid from a healthy animal. Unfortunately he didn't know which part of the glands in the neck was the thyroid exactly so he just cut all the parts from the neck and packaged it for me. I was hoping you might be identify it for me? Some of it is the thymus I believe and the other part is the thyroid. My assumption is that the smaller thingy is the thyroid.

Thanks

Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: Haai on February 09, 2014, 08:23:41 am
Where in the sheep did you find it???

Tapeworms should not be in sheep.  Only cysts.  Adult tapeworm should only be found in carnivores (humans included).

Maybe these are some kind of other worms??

Over the past couple of months I've eaten several wild kangaroos. I've seen tapeworms in at least two of them. I was quite surprised to find that even the liver of one of them, which looked like a very healthy liver on the outside, was chockablock full of tapeworms. Pretty much every hole/vessel in the liver contained tapeworm.
I think it must be very normal for animals to contain parasites, and I think it would have been very normal for Palaeolithic man to have parasites. Nevertheless, I couldn't bring myself to eat the liver that was full of tapeworms (fed it to dog lol), however I have eaten one that only had one or two tapeworms in it (which I removed), with the knowledge that I would probably end up ingesting tapeworm or cysts that I hadn't seen.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: FRANCIS HOWARD BOND on June 10, 2014, 11:58:59 pm
The sheep I just butchered is infested with tapeworms, what should I do?
Should I tell the farmer? If I do, they might give them chemical wormers and that may pose a greater risk to the quality of the animal. At least with the worms I know that its paleo quality.
QUOTE:
This is the third sheep I got from the farm so I am sure I have already eaten two animals that were also infected. I take no precautions with avoiding the entrails , so I probably have been exposed years ago. It worries me, that I may be infected and not even know, and the worms could be slowly growing and robbing me of my vitality. The only reason I found them is because I was experimenting with washing out the intestines with a hose, and they were flushed out.
REPLY:
I hope now you have found the culprit and identified it as safe, and I understand you have since been completely cleared of any symptoms for take off, you will enjoy all your flight with all other sheepish aspects down to the last of the entrails including every bit of stomach and intestines or poo etc. with no further doubts or fears for safety?   Good munching!
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on June 11, 2014, 05:57:56 am
I was told that the most common tape worm infections in sheep are of a type of worm that needs an intermediate host to begin its life cycle, and so is not infectious directly to humans.

I have eatten infected animals for years without issue.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on June 11, 2014, 06:01:51 am
http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/tapeworms.html (http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/tapeworms.html)
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: thehadezb on January 29, 2019, 05:08:24 am
@sabertooth Do you have any advice to notice if my lamb carcass is fatty enough? Where I should look and/or touch to determine the amount of subcutaneous and intramuscular fat? Is mutton fattier than lamb? I want to eat a cut of lamb that is well balanced in fat to meat ratio to avoid adding external sources of fat such as butter, which one do you recommend?

I don't know if this question have been answered before. Hope you could share your knowledge with us.
Title: Re: The Butcher
Post by: sabertooth on January 29, 2019, 08:55:58 am
My advice would be to eat mutton and not lamb...most pasture raised lamb being sold on the market does not contain enough fats to sustain my diet. I go after the fattest, fully mature, pasture raised animals I can find.

I can usually tell by just looking at the Animals how much fat they have to offer. Sometimes it can be difficult if they have a full coat of wool to hide behind, and I will try to tell by feel, the fattest Animals that are for sale.

Fully grown mutton that is properly nourished, and from a stocky built meat breed, like a dorper or katahdin, should have copious amounts of fat throughout the whole animal.

The fattest purly pasture raised sheep I have had were from older ewes that have been left unbred for at least a year...not having to nurse young lambs will allow the animal to pack on maximum levels of fatty goodness. Older Rams will also get really fat if they are seperated from the females....not constantly chasing tail and fighting for mates, they tend just to eat all day and put on fat.