Author Topic: partly raw?  (Read 4835 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline High-king

  • Forager
  • *
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
partly raw?
« on: March 14, 2009, 01:25:18 pm »
So I've heard you need to eat a largely raw diet in order for the taste change to occur, but is it possible to eat a partly raw/cooked diet without losing the taste for one or the other? I doubt I'll find organic chicken around here, and I worry about salmonella

Offline TylerDurden

  • Global Moderator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 17,016
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Raw Paleolithic Diet
Re: partly raw?
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2009, 06:58:58 pm »
So I've heard you need to eat a largely raw diet in order for the taste change to occur, but is it possible to eat a partly raw/cooked diet without losing the taste for one or the other? I doubt I'll find organic chicken around here, and I worry about salmonella

Well, it is possible, but just  less likely.

If you're in Norway, you should presumably  be able to get hold of high-quality wildcaught seafood by the ton. A rawist acquaintance of mine who lives in Finland has access to reinder meats, including raw reindeer suet and marrow - I would guess that reindeer is available in Norway as well? You'd be surprised how many other kinds of raw meats are available if you're prepared to look around enough farmers' marketssearch online  etc.

Personally, I view organic-raised chicken as not too healthy, anyway, as they are nearly always raised on 100% grain diets, rather than the omnivorous diets they would eat in the wild.

Re salmonella:- This is a needless scare that was overpromoted by the media. Aajonus pointed out a current report showed  that salmonella exists in c.38% of american households without causing issues. It's not bacteria that cause the problems but the fact that people are eating unhealthy foods such as grainfed chicken etc. Anyway, there are no reported salmonella outbreaks among rawpalaeos, and never have been.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline High-king

  • Forager
  • *
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: partly raw?
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2009, 12:17:26 am »
how about eating steaks bloody rare?

Is there anyway to cure the meat which does not cause problems?

Offline TylerDurden

  • Global Moderator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 17,016
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Raw Paleolithic Diet
Re: partly raw?
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2009, 02:23:11 am »
how about eating steaks bloody rare?

Is there anyway to cure the meat which does not cause problems?

You could make beef jerky, I suppose. There are instructions in the recipe subforum(culinary creations).

Eating steaks bloody rare means the food is still lightly cooked, missing out on enzymes etc.. Some rawists say there is little damage if the meat is seared for 10 seconds on each side.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Satya

  • Guest
Re: partly raw?
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2009, 02:42:30 am »
Any raw food you can eat will be a good step in the right direction.  Most pathogenic bacteria come from cooked foods, as all the beneficial, naturally occurring bacteria are killed, allowing pathogens to grow unchecked.  Raw meats that are raised and processed in poor conditions are the real problem, if there is salmonella, campylobacter or E. coli.  If you find a reputable, non-industrial source, there probably would not be any problem.

Healthy people have more bacteria in their guts than cells in their bodies.  That said, if you are worried about pathogens in raw foods, marinating in an acid or salt will probably take care of anything.  Sally Fallon says fish parasites can be killed by marinating in acid (like lemon juice), but I have never confirmed this.  You may want to eat some lacto-fermented food with your meat to ensure you have some probiotic bacteria too.  They tend to keep any pathogens in check, by competing with them.

Searing is certainly better than cooking something well done.

Offline High-king

  • Forager
  • *
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: partly raw?
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2009, 06:38:43 am »
Okay, with disease out of the question, anyway to make meat softer? Some muscle meats, particularly pork, seem very hard to chew. I'm going on a journey and though I love jerky, I takes to long to prepare. Marination sounds good, but I doubt it will be easy to find lemons or salt or alcohol in the Norwegian wilderness.

I know steaming reduces formation of AGE, but I don't know if it softens the meat. I'll still be eating organs raw, but to increase availability I might need some cooking

Offline TylerDurden

  • Global Moderator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 17,016
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Raw Paleolithic Diet
Re: partly raw?
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2009, 06:41:17 am »
Probably best to buy some sort of food-processor/blender/grinder to soften the meats.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline Raw Kyle

  • Global Moderator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,701
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: partly raw?
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2009, 12:29:54 pm »
I used to think some meats were tough but I don't know if I changed or what but it doesn't bother me at all anymore. One thing I do with tough meat is cut it into very small pieces. I usually get cubes of meat and cut them into even smaller pieces with kitchen scissors, so if the meat is especially tough I just make sure to cut it even smaller than usual.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk