Author Topic: Sheep have no Wild Ancestors: Evolutionists and Geneticists invited here  (Read 7033 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline goodsamaritan

  • Administrator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,798
  • Gender: Male
  • Geek Healer Truth Seeker Pro-Natal Pro-Life
    • View Profile
    • Filipino Services Inc.
As you guys know lately I have been interested in ancient aliens / Annunaki being the creators of humans on Earth as a result of genetic engineering and more breeding from themselves when we became compatible.

In the ancient Sumerian stories it mentioned a curiosity that after the Great Flood of Noah's ark fame... they jump started human civilization and gave humans SHEEP from their planet Nibiru.

So I got curious and started researching for SHEEP

And this is what I came up with:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_domestic_sheep

The history of the domesticated sheep traces back to between 11000 and 9000 BC, and the domestication of the wild mouflon in ancient Mesopotamia. Sheep are thought to be one of the first animals domesticated by humans, and there is evidence of sheep farming in Iranian statuary dating to that time period. These sheep were primarily raised for meat, milk, and skins. Woolly sheep began to be developed around 6000 BC in Iran, and cultures such as the Persians became dependent on sheep's wool for trading. They were then imported to Africa and Europe via trading.

Wild Ancesters (unclear)

The exact line of descent between domestic sheep and their wild ancestors is unclear.[1] The most common hypothesis states that Ovis aries is descended from the Asiatic (O. orientalis) species of mouflon. It has been proposed that the European mouflon (O. musimon) is an ancient breed of domestic sheep turned feral rather than an ancestor, despite its commonly being cited as ancestor in past literature.[2]:5 A few breeds of sheep, such as the Castlemilk Moorit from Scotland, were formed through crossbreeding with wild European mouflon.[3]

Then I saw this:

http://retrieverman.net/2010/02/24/what-species-is-the-ancestor-of-the-domestic-sheep/

Why do the religious have to get involved in this?  Human origins thing... bible thing:

I got interested in sheep because of a disagreement I had with a particular sermon  that I heard as a young boy.  The elderly Methodist minister said that the reason why sheep and lambs were so revered in the Bible was because they had no wild ancestors. The sheep exists solely as a domestic animal for man to use, just as man exists solely for God’s purposes.

Of course, I was skeptical. I had never heard of a domestic species that had no wild variant. Animals didn’t just appear.

...

Well, it turns out that the European mouflon is actually the dingo among sheep. Just as dingoes descended from fully domesticated dogs, mouflon descend from some population of wild Asian sheep. These sheep went wild after been introduced to Europe. They first appeared in Corsica and Sardinia 7,000 years ago, and from there, they began to appear on the European mainland. For a long time, it was believed that the European mouflon was the ancestor of domestic sheep.

But it is actually the other way around. Domestic sheep are the ancestors of the European mouflon.

That is nice to know, but it still doesn’t tell us what the wild ancestor was.


Someone already made a comment about Sumerian texts and Nibiru origins in 2013:

Quote
Let us review another approach, the scientific and the historical/mythological.
I begin with the historical/mythological.
I have read the book The Lost book of Enki (by Zecharia Sitchin) where he tell us about what sumerians said about, among other things, the sheep, also known as Ovis aries. (Nowadays we know that the Holy Bible, old part at least, are legacy stories from the sumerians religion, among others the Deluge and Genesis).
Sitchin (the sumerians actually) says that the sheep come from another planet. I like his books but this time I thought that he went crazy…
But now I found a research by The Royal Society (Stefan Hiendleder and others) named “Molecular analysis of wild and domestic sheep questions current nomenclature and provided evidence for domestication from two different subspecies” and you can read this paper here: http://www.kora.ch/malme/05_library/5_1_publications/H/Hiendleder_et_al_2002_Molecular_analysis_of_wild_and_domestic_sheep.pdf
In the discussion part, page 11, you can read: “…as maternal ancestors of O. aries, the origin of haplogroup A remains unknown. ”
They, in this paper, talk about two old kind of sheep groups: A and B. Group B seems to have something common with Ovis musimon, while group A have NOT some known (in Earth?) ancestor.
Science confirm what Sitchin says, that Ovis aries (domestic sheep, cluster “A”) have not an ancestor. Not known in this planet anyway.

I also remember a teaching from "Food is your Medicine" by Henry Bieler that he recommends SHEEP in the rawest form possible for human consumption as the best meat of all time.

I look forward to all you guys and gals' research and POVs in this hunt for truth about SHEEP.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2014, 11:32:10 am by goodsamaritan »
Linux Geek, Web Developer, Email Provider, Businessman, Engineer, REAL Free Healer, Pro-Life, Pro-Family, Truther, Ripple-XRP Fan

I'm the network administrator.
My business: Website Dev & Hosting and Email Server Provider,
My blogs: Cure Manual, My Health Blog, Eczema Cure & Psoriasis Cure

Offline jessica

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,026
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
What about Rocky Mountain big horn sheep? Maybe they just didn't originate on that continent and god is just a nomadic Shepard from an extremely distant land..

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bighorn_sheep
« Last Edit: July 19, 2014, 11:16:25 am by jessica »

Offline sabertooth

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,098
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
I say its possible that pre agrarian human nomadic civilizations were responsible for the emergence of what we now know as sheep.

I imagine that around the time all the mega fauna died off, there were a number of wandering tribes that learned to capture young forest fauna, to tame ,breed, and harvest. Over the generations through selective breeding, a completely new animal emerged, with traits that supplied the needs of hunter gathering cultures. These pre historic herds peoples must have lived lightly off the land ways that very little remained for history to know them by. Living nomadically , wandering vast distances with there flocks. Having no metallic tools, stone structure, written language or any other more lasting relics, history has forgotten these people.

The original ancestors of the sheep were likely to have been hunted to extinction long ago, or perhaps they interbred with re wilded domesticated varieties, to create the kind of "wild sheep" breeds we see today.

A man who makes a beast of himself, forgets the pain of being a man.

Offline goodsamaritan

  • Administrator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,798
  • Gender: Male
  • Geek Healer Truth Seeker Pro-Natal Pro-Life
    • View Profile
    • Filipino Services Inc.
Love your ideas you guys.  This is why this forum rocks.
Linux Geek, Web Developer, Email Provider, Businessman, Engineer, REAL Free Healer, Pro-Life, Pro-Family, Truther, Ripple-XRP Fan

I'm the network administrator.
My business: Website Dev & Hosting and Email Server Provider,
My blogs: Cure Manual, My Health Blog, Eczema Cure & Psoriasis Cure

Offline juston33

  • Forager
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
veloped around 6000 BC in Iran, and cultures such as the Persians became dependent on sheep's wool for trading. They were then imported to Africa and Europe via trading.


____________________________________________________
asad

Offline TylerDurden

  • Global Moderator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 17,016
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Raw Paleolithic Diet
"O Tempora, O Mores!"

"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline PaleoPhil

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 6,198
  • Gender: Male
  • Mad scientist (not into blind Paleo re-enactment)
    • View Profile
Quote
Genetic distances and molecular datings based on O. canadensis CR and mtDNA protein-coding sequences provide strong evidence for domestications from two mouflon subspecies. ...

Likely candidates for truly wild ancestors of [haplogroup] cluster B are mouflon populations found in Turkey and western Iran. These sheep are currently referred to as O. orientalis anatolica and O. orientalis gmelini, although their subspecies status is debatable. ...

the origin of haplogroup [cluster] A remains unknown. Considering the probable subspecies relationship of the founders of both clusters of domestic sheep matrilines, mouflon (O. orientalis) populations of the eastern mouflon range are probable candidates.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1690972

Ovis orientalis anatolica


TURKISH MOUFLON (Ovis gmelinii anatolica)
>"When some one eats an Epi paleo Rx template and follows the rules of circadian biology they get plenty of starches when they are available three out of the four seasons." -Jack Kruse, MD
>"I recommend 20 percent of calories from carbs, depending on the size of the person" -Ron Rosedale, MD (in other words, NOT zero carbs) http://preview.tinyurl.com/6ogtan
>Finding a diet you can tolerate is not the same as fixing what's wrong. -Tim Steele
Beware of problems from chronic Very Low Carb

Offline jessica

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,026
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
http://savenaturesavehuman.blogspot.com/2013_03_01_archive.html



 Saiga antelope have an extremely distinctive appearance with an enlarged nose that hangs down over the mouth. Despite their common name these ungulates are thought to be intermediates between antelope and sheep.

Offline jessica

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,026
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: Sheep have no Wild Ancestors: Evolutionists and Geneticists invited here
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2015, 12:56:36 am »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Himalayan_tahr

this wikipedia article says otherwise but i have read that they are more closely related to sheep than goats.

Offline RogueFarmer

  • Chief
  • *****
  • Posts: 570
    • View Profile
Re: Sheep have no Wild Ancestors: Evolutionists and Geneticists invited here
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2015, 02:59:50 am »
Supposedly although rare sheep and goats can actually interbreed even though sheep have more chromosomes than goats.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2015, 03:04:44 am by cherimoya_kid »

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk