Author Topic: Bacterial influence on saturated and unsaturated fat  (Read 2976 times)

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Offline NuclearKnight

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Bacterial influence on saturated and unsaturated fat
« on: April 23, 2016, 10:22:43 am »
I've been thinking that maybe fermenting walnuts can convert the polyunsaturated fats into saturated fats and fermenting coconut can convert the saturated fats into mono/polyunsaturated fats. It stands to reason that the hydrogen atoms in fats could be influenced by bacteria which produce hydrogen. Your thoughts?

Offline eveheart

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Re: Bacterial influence on saturated and unsaturated fat
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2016, 10:40:01 am »
I'm not too science-y, but are you talking about something similar to the way kefir grains change milk fat? Also, how are you fermenting the walnuts and coconuts, with a starter probiotic, in fermenting veggies, or ???
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Offline NuclearKnight

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Re: Bacterial influence on saturated and unsaturated fat
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2016, 03:31:50 am »
Walnuts are soaked then blended; Coconut meat is mashed. This is because coconuts are moist while walnuts are dry. The blending and mashing mimic chewing and give the bacteria more room to work. No need to add bacteria; they will find it if they aren't already there.

Fermented coconut becomes runnier and fermented walnuts become thicker which makes me think the fatty structure becomes saturated or unsaturated.

What are you saying about kefir grains and milk fat? I understand Lactobacillus eat the sugars, but do they eat the fat too? Coconuts and walnuts are fatty with little protein and carbs, so whatever bacteria eat those will be more fat loving than carb loving.

Offline eveheart

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Re: Bacterial influence on saturated and unsaturated fat
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2016, 03:43:58 am »
What are you saying about kefir grains and milk fat? I understand Lactobacillus eat the sugars, but do they eat the fat too? Coconuts and walnuts are fatty with little protein and carbs, so whatever bacteria eat those will be more fat loving than carb loving.

I heard that about kefir from something I read a long time ago. I ferment cabbage, so I've always tucked meats or nuts into the cabbage ferment, thinking that the L. bacteria needed the carbs in the cabbage. I'll have to try what you're doing. It sounds kinda like fermenting taro for poi. I tend to limit my ferments to the salty-water kind.
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Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: Bacterial influence on saturated and unsaturated fat
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2016, 05:20:11 am »
I've eaten plenty of fermented coconut. I don't know what it does as far as changing the fat structure, but it definitely becomes more digestible.

Offline NuclearKnight

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Re: Bacterial influence on saturated and unsaturated fat
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2016, 11:41:35 am »
Even fermented plums become more digestible with no diarrhea. The sorbitol must be eaten or altered by bacteria. I do not know if I'm arranging my ferments properly. Whether it's meat, nuts, fruits, I'm sure ancient trial and error established the right temperature, ph, bacteria along with methods to control these conditions. Much wisdom is lost and forgotten, and I must relearn at my own peril, so I see why one would add meat to sauerkraut. Sauerkraut factors are more known than say, fermented fish.


 

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