Author Topic: Using refined sugar for kombucha like using refined oil for mayonnaise  (Read 1155 times)

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Offline NuclearKnight

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Kombucha is supposed to be healthful, yet I notice all the recipes I encounter call for refined cane sugar. If bacteria and yeast can turn refined cane sugar into a healthful compound, why can't the same be said for a fermented mayonnaise recipe that calls for refined corn oil? Honey and olive oil I would prefer to use for such recipes, but I read and hear that most honey is adulterated with high fructose corn syrup and most olive oil is adulterated with hazelnut oil. I don't want to fill the pockets of food fraudsters with my money, so maybe I'll have to do without my olive oil and honey. At least lesser quality sweeteners and oils you know you get what you pay for, except I don't want to fill the pockets of these people either. My health is what I particularly do not wish to compromise, as I have done enough of that in my life. Ultimately, do you think bacteria can breath life back into dead fats like they supposedly can dead carbs, both of which are extracted with toxins at high temperatures?

Offline sabertooth

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Kombucha is easy to make... all you need is a healthy mother scoby, clean water, the herbs or teas of your choice, and a Raw form of sugar. My girlfriend makes hers with raw cane sugar, and after brewing for a month or so nearly all the sugars are converted by the scoby into a low carb probiotic drink.

You could also make make Jun ( a honey sweetened kombucha) which could be made with local raw honey.
A man who makes a beast of himself, forgets the pain of being a man.

Offline NuclearKnight

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I soak brown rice in distilled water for 14 days then drain the soaking water. The soaked rice water is then mixed with honey in a ratio of 1/4 cup honey for every 1 cup of the rice water with me shaking the jar until the honey dissolves. I start drinking it 7 days later.

Store honey always tastes, feels, and looks the exact same, smells the same and has a weak odor, regardless of the brand. The "local" honey though has specs (I'm guessing pollen), has a strong scent that varies, and tastes different each time, so I think it is legitimate.

Does anyone make a fermented mayonnaise?




 

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