Author Topic: Young children and meat  (Read 6652 times)

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Metallica

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Young children and meat
« on: June 03, 2008, 06:30:12 am »
Why do you think young children generally do not eat meat..

i have a 2 year old nephew who rarely eats meat, he only eats it if its mixed in with something else... this is quite common among young children..

the only reason i can think of is that hunter/gather children are usually weaned to the ages of 4-5, this is probably why children love sweet foods and carby foods because of the sugar, breastmilk is decent amount of sugar... after weaning they change over to meat/plant based diet.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2008, 09:36:21 am »
Makes sense, but then again the kind of meat they are served these days is not natural so maybe that's why they shun it. Who knows, maybe young kids in Inuit or other raw meat consuming tribes really like meat at a young age. I think I did hear reports of that, of young kids eating seal fat like candy and even enjoying the high meat.

Offline TheWayCreatesTheWarrior

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2008, 03:21:00 pm »


at what age are teeth prominant enough for chewing meat?

i just assume that if you havent developed a full set of teeth yet, maybe your body doesnt send out the signals to want meat.
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xylothrill

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2008, 04:07:11 pm »


I haven't heard of them doing that with meat so much as I have heard of it with vegetables. Maybe it IS because they're weaned too early or maybe it's because it's cooked and is too lean rather than fatty. If there's any kind of instinct involved, rabbit starvation would be a good enough reason for kids to shun lean meats as a survival instinct/innate skill.

Craig

Offline Nicola

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2008, 05:41:31 pm »

at what age are teeth prominant enough for chewing meat?

i just assume that if you havent developed a full set of teeth yet, maybe your body doesnt send out the signals to want meat.

I thought one does not have to chew meat - at least one person on this forum bolts it down. I have watched (on TV) Inuit kids eat (chew? bolt down?) frozen fish.

Nicola

Satya

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2008, 08:11:56 pm »

at what age are teeth prominant enough for chewing meat?

i just assume that if you havent developed a full set of teeth yet, maybe your body doesnt send out the signals to want meat.

This is why traditionally, women - and men too :) - would chew up liver and such for the younglings, until they could handle softer meats on their own.  Eggs are pretty easy to eat raw too ... just drink.



xylothrill

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2008, 09:16:14 am »
This is why traditionally, women - and men too :) - would chew up liver and such for the younglings, until they could handle softer meats on their own.  Eggs are pretty easy to eat raw too ... just drink.




Eating some eggs would also give you the calcium that's lost during the bleeding of animals. Magnesium is not tested for in the blood because it doesn't reside there, much like potassium. It resides in the tissues and cells themselves. Sodium and calcium are tested for because they do indeed reside in the blood. So, maybe a couple of eggs and a pinch of sea salt, without over-doing it, would a suitable substitute for what we don't get in bloody animals.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2008, 10:01:20 am by Craig »

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2008, 03:08:50 am »
Eating some eggs would also give you the calcium that's lost during the bleeding of animals. Magnesium is not tested for in the blood because it doesn't reside there, much like potassium. It resides in the tissues and cells themselves. Sodium and calcium are tested for because they do indeed reside in the blood. So, maybe a couple of eggs and a pinch of sea salt, without over-doing it, would a suitable substitute for what we don't get in bloody animals.

How would we eat the eggs? I only like eggs blended with dairy or cooked, not a fan of the "Rocky style" egg consumption.

Offline Nicola

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2008, 04:03:55 am »
The Bear:

My direct experience with young babies is that they always instantly take to raw or rare meat, and vigorously reject any and all vegetation. A pediatrician told me at the time of my second kid that a human baby has the ability to digest only two things at birth- human milk and raw meat in paste/chewed up form (so long as not offered with too high a fat level).


Offline Nicola

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #9 on: June 06, 2008, 04:28:17 am »
Eating some eggs would also give you the calcium that's lost during the bleeding of animals. Magnesium is not tested for in the blood because it doesn't reside there, much like potassium. It resides in the tissues and cells themselves. Sodium and calcium are tested for because they do indeed reside in the blood. So, maybe a couple of eggs and a pinch of sea salt, without over-doing it, would a suitable substitute for what we don't get in bloody animals.

Is the no sodium in the meat? (Sorry, I must have a salt tick) The Bear:

Salt is not good in your food, it is a chemical- and will damage your skin and your kidneys over time. It also interferes with fat metabolism. When I was a dancer, I used no salt in anything, I drank huge amounts of plain water during class, and never had a bit of problem, whereas the other dancers scarfed salt tablets like candy and still had problems- plus their clothes dried out with a heavy salt rime on them. The skin and the kidneys are forced to shed excess salt and cannot quickly stop, however if you eat at least 30 gm of meat a day you will get all the salt you need, the urine and sweat can go as low as a few parts/billion of salt to conserve it.

Salt is an addiction. It is culturally induced induced by the need to add some salt for flavour in vegetables. When I gave up salt, the only food that I ate which seemed to need salt was eggs, but after a few years this passed- unsalted butter made the difference- without that added fat eggs are definitely very bland. Take care to only buy and use unsalted butter. Salt in butter is there as a preservative, thus the level is very high. Unsalted butter is a bit more expensive because only very fresh cream can be used to make it, whereas soured cream, neutralised with soda is used to make 'regular' butter that is then preserved with salt. The very best and tastiest butter possible is made at home by shaking pure cream, and separating the resulting delicious near-white butter from the whey.

Taking in more salt than you body needs is very, very bad for you. If your sweat tastes salty, you have too much intake. Both the skin and the kidneys dump salt, but cannot 'change gears' quickly. Both organs are affected by passing salt. The salt content of sweat and urine can go down to a few parts per million, to conserve the saline balance of the bodies tissues. It only takes about one ounce of any meat/day to supply all the sodium your body requires. for normal saline balance. I sometimes sweat so proficiently that I need to drink 3 or four litres of water in less than an hour. I have no effects of low salt, and my sweat is never salty. I used to watch the other kids in ballet class scarfing slat tabs, while I just drank water, my shirt was very wet, but dried out normal but theirs were rimed with a heavy white salt crust,indicating that the massive excess of alt was simply being dumped. If they did not eat the salt tabs when drinking water, they fainted.

If addicted to salt, just like with any other addiction, when you stop using, you will experience 'side effects', such as everything suddenly seeming tasteless and bland. If you persist, salt becomes vile-tasting, and food without salt very tasty (but not (sodium-deficient) veggies-tasteless by nature, but which we are not talking about here).

It takes several days for your body to stop dumping salt through the skin and kidneys and begin conserving it, so when quitting, be aware of your salt balance- you may experience light headed-ness and the other classic signs of low sodium, if necessary take a tiny pinch- but try to stop all salt as quickly as you can tolerate it. Salt was a significant cause of my grandfather's demise at 91 from kidney failure. I consider it a chemical poison. Only vegetarians have a salt-deficiency in their diet.


Muscle cells need calcium to function, therefore heavy red-meat consumption supplies calcium in abundance and in the most assimulatable form possible. The way archeologists can easily separate stone-age-diet Eskimo/Inuit skulls from modern Inuit (western-diet) skulls is by the former's extremely dense bone structure (coupled with evidence of no caries).


xylothrill

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #10 on: June 06, 2008, 10:56:05 am »
Nicola,

I agree sodium is toxic in large amounts but not the tiny amounts needed to prevent deficiency.
The bear does eat eggs and 6 raw eggs contain 1837.1 mg of sodium. That's quite a bit!

Craig

xylothrill

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Re: Young children and meat
« Reply #11 on: June 06, 2008, 02:58:59 pm »
How would we eat the eggs? I only like eggs blended with dairy or cooked, not a fan of the "Rocky style" egg consumption.

Kyle,

Just drink them! Do you like eggnog? People have been drinking it for centuries and I think AV may even have a recipe for it. There really isn't much of a taste. I use to try to avoid them when I found out about the high calcium to magnesium ratio but since learning about the calcium and sodium in blood, which is hard to come by, I've though about adding some back into my diet. It doesn't take much - only two eggs to bring the ratio of Ca:Mg in a pound or so of meat to 1:1. Just like anything, you'll get used to it. Bronson doesn't like raw liver and I didn't either at first but now I like it.

I saw something on television somewhat recently about a man stuck out to sea in a broken down boat. It was on one of the educational channels but can't find a link to it on the web. He survived on raw fish flesh but after a while the flesh wasn't enough. He started craving ALL parts of the fish he caught including the eyeballs! He said he craved them as well as the innards and they tasted good. It was explained how the body has a feedback system that realizes what it needs and connects it to what you've eaten that has those nutrients in it. The body then sends signals to crave these items when needed and you'll relish the taste.

I believe that one of the problems with our "modern" SAD diets is the fortification of processed foods coupled with the mixing of several foods at one sitting. This makes it nearly impossible for the body to discern exactly where those nutrient are coming from. So this throws our natural craving and hunger mechanism out of whack especially when we are deficient in something. The body doesn't know what to crave to get the nutrients it need so it craves food in general. I'm sure it was on one of the informational channels so there must be a link about it on one of their sites somewhere.

Craig



« Last Edit: June 06, 2008, 03:05:08 pm by Craig »

 

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