Author Topic: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD  (Read 1913 times)

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Offline RogueFarmer

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Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« on: December 11, 2016, 02:14:12 am »
https://www.icmag.com/ic/showthread.php?t=312208

Balancing Soil Minerals

Hi All- Michael Astera here. I'm starting this thread hoping to get a discussion going about the connection between soil minerals and world class cannabis.

Some ICMag members know me from the soilminerals dot com website or from The Ideal Soil book, or from email correspondence and working together on soil fertility projects. I joined ICMag in 2010 but have had little time to read or post here until now. The last couple of years I've been working on several full time projects, but I promised myself I would get back to spend some time at ICMag, because cannabis growing is the cutting edge of agriculture today.

How and why is cannabis the cutting edge? Because, at least at the more refined levels, growers are concerned about aesthetics: flavor, aroma, subtle differences in physiological and psychological effects. Most of agriculture is concerned only with yield, appearance, uniformity, and perhaps shipping and storage qualities. This criticism applies just as much to organic agriculture as it does to chemical agriculture. When was the last time you ate a piece of fruit from the store that had truly outstanding flavor, sweetness, complexity? Neither organic nor chemical agriculture has much of a clue about how to grow sweet, flavorful fruit or high-protein grains or nutrient-dense tasty vegetables. Both are playing the NPK game; the only real difference is their sources of NPK and whether they are using synthetic or "natural" remedies for weeds, insects, and disease.

A further problem is plant breeding and genetics. For at least the last sixty years, fruit trees, grains, and vegetable varieties have been bred and selected solely for the attributes listed above: Yield, appearance, uniformity, and shipping/storage qualities, not flavor or nutrient content or health benefits. Cannabis growers, on the other hand, have put great thought and effort into selecting strains that produce the finest aesthetic and medicinal qualities.

I grew my first "successful" cannabis crop in 1976. At the time I was living in a small rental house in a large Midwestern city. I set out about a dozen plants, along with an equal number of Crackerjack marigolds, in the space between the sidewalk and the foundation on the side of the house. By midsummer both the cannabis and the marigolds were budding and beginning to bloom. The lawn hadn't been mowed since spring and was knee-high, so I hired a local kid to mow it one day while I was at work. When I came home I found that he had mowed the flower bed as well, thinking it was all just weeds. Luckily he hadn't raked, so I spent a frantic hour digging through the nearby grass clippings and managed to save almost an ounce of leaf and buds. Since then I have grown whenever the opportunity arose, including a few years of commercial growing and plant breeding outdoors in the Pacific NW.

In Venezuela where I now live the laws against cannabis are harsher than the US, so I grow only a vegetable garden; my involvement with cannabis growing is limited to advising others on soil fertility.

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2016, 02:24:41 am »
The Ideal Soil

My first organic garden was planted in 1973. From the start I didn't rely solely on compost, mulch, and manure, I also used the minerals that J I Rodale recommended: Jersey Greensand, Florida soft rock phosphate, dolomite lime. In the mid-1980s I added kelp meal and by the late '80s I was using glacial rock dust as well. All of these, along with manure and compost, grew nice gardens but there really was no rhyme or reason to it. I didn't test the soil and wouldn't have known what to do with the results if I had. The fog began to lift in 1999, when a friend passed along a newsletter written by Gary Kline, founder of Black Lake Organic nursery in Olympia Washington. Gary had read the works of William Albrecht and his students and followers published by Acres USA, as well as the books written by Carey Reams' students Dan Skow and Arden Andersen, and then had condensed the salient points into about 20 pages. The message was clear and I got it immediately: The source of fertility, health, and nutrition in the soil is the minerals in that soil, not the organic matter. Further, there were optimal amounts of minerals that would allow a plant to reach its full genetic potential.

Gary's newsletter inspired me to read the Acres USA books on agronomy, have my soil tested, and begin experimenting. After reading that small library (Albrecht, Walters, Kinsey, Zimmerman, Sait, Andersen, Skow, and Reams) I found that, beyond balancing the major cations Calcium, Magnesium, and Potassium to a 65:10:5 ratio, where Albrecht had left it in the 1960s, I had little idea what to do with the other primary and secondary elements such as Phosphorus, Sulfur, Sodium, Boron, Iron, Manganese, Copper, and Zinc. The books I had read did a great job of convincing me of the importance and worth of balancing soil minerals, but they didn't teach how to do it. Rather, they seemed more to be sales pitches, telling just enough to entice the reader to hire the author as a consultant.

This frustration led to almost a decade of further reading and experimentation. I sent soil samples to the lab from my gardens and from friends' gardens and pastures, paying for it out of pocket and even buying the minerals to amend their soils. From Carey Reams work I got the idea that P should equal K. From a chance remark in Graeme Sait's Nutrition Rules came the idea that Zn should equal 1/10th of P. Various college agronomy texts provided clues for optimum levels of Iron and Manganese. Through it all I was looking to tie Albrecht's base cation saturation ratios for Ca, Mg, and K with the other elements, not as absolute amounts but as ratios and proportions relative to the CEC (cation exchange capacity) of the soil. I made friends with Gary Kline and we began meeting weekly for long lunches and conversations. Starting in the 1980s, Gary had developed a line of 10 different organic fertilizers and wanted to improve them by bringing them into line with the Albrecht principles. In 2004 he asked me to do the mineral balancing and chemistry for the new versions. I felt that I had enough good results from my experiments to take a somewhat bold stance, and set the fertilizers up with the proportions that had worked best. The new fertilizer formulas performed well and got excellent customer reviews.

By 2006 I was spending much of my time writing custom soil Rx's for people in the Puget Sound region; by 2008 that had expanded to include growers from around the world. But, my goal was not to promote a consulting business; it was to spread the mineral message, and the best way to do that was to teach others what I had learned, so that they could write their own soil mineral prescriptions and, if they wished, do the same for others. In December 2009 the first edition of The Ideal Soil was published as a PDF ebook, followed a few months later by the hardcopy. Since then the principles and Ideal Soil method have been applied successfully, around the world. A revised and expanded version was published in 2014, which has since been translated into Spanish, Dutch, Swedish, and Polish.

Offline HelpMeToHelpEwe

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Re: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2016, 03:10:33 am »
Hopefully someday folks will appreciate the profound value of mineral rich soil and mineral rich food and quit thinking that taking supplements is a long term, biologically appropriate way to get those critical minerals which facilitate virtually every facet of health in terms of maintenance, fuel and cleansing.....not to mention they seem to act like receivers or transistors in our bodies making way for us to be as in touch as humanly possible with the electric universe around us in this low vibratory plane.

A friend of mine introduced me to Astera's work a while back. Then during a visit surrounding wild caught king salmon sashimi and roe he showed me his experiment of pitting Astera's made-to-order soils against your average run of the mill topsoil and side by side it was almost laughable the difference. I knew instantly which was which without him telling me and it was because on the one hand you had this supremely healthy spread of tomatoes, kale, swiss chard, herbs and lettuces and on the other hand was bug riddled sad shadows of the Astera-grown versions. Balance and nutritional (for a given system) density along with harnessing so called subtle energies (electric universe again, OhmTeslaTesla) seems to be the name of the game for producing plants (and animals and humanimals) that are shimmering exemplars of their species' (epi)genetic potentials. :) Got to love this infinite universe. No limits baby!   

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Marijuana and the future of food
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2016, 03:30:55 am »
While palaeo-era cannabis/marijuana was undoubtedly less injurious(see wild marijuana), one has to bear in mind that modern, intensively-cultivated  strains thereof are much more harmful:-

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3632804/Cannabis-addictive-smoking-harms-brain-permanently.html

If you want to experience drug "highs", then the best option, imo, is to try magic mushrooms and magic truffles. Such cannot ever be addictive, as, if one takes them more often than once or twice a week, the effects start quickly vanishing as the body quickly starts getting used to the hallucinogenic components of a drug that is, after all, just a part of Nature. More to the point, halluciongenic mushrooms are, undoubtedly, far more authentically palaeolithic than modern drugs like marijuana/cannabis.
"What is the point of growing up If you can't be childish sometimes..." - Tom Baker as Dr Who.

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2016, 04:22:07 am »
Tyler I want to make bloody money man. I want to fuckin eat bloody hell!

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2016, 04:24:04 am »
Besides you are ignoring the fact that marijuana appears to cure and treat more illnesses than any other one plant product that is consumed by humans on a regular basis.

Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2016, 04:28:44 am »
Tyler, allmost the plants almost everyone eats are domesticated, even your precious mushrooms have most likely been domesticated by someone to prefer growing on cooked rice. As far as we know a great deal of the fruits we eat don't even exist in an eddible form in the wild as you well know.

Offline HelpMeToHelpEwe

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Re: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2016, 05:16:59 am »
I'm curious Ty to how much cannabis you've consumed over your life. I used to be terribly worried that it would do significant, reversible damage, especially with regard to my elocution as I have always been exceedingly articulate in the day to day to the point that people draw attention to it frequently without solicitation (I always thought I spoke like everyone else but that was a lack of empathy and awareness..). Now, at 30, after having started using cannabis in all forms (hash from middle east, flowers from africa, the US, nederlands, canada, hawaii, and having grown many years crops myself) since the age of 15, and having ranged from smoking 6-12 times daily (used like an infant's pacifier in my darkest times) to having taken up to a year off of use at a time, cold turkey through use of will, I can tell you that quite the opposite has been true. It has almost freed up my self-imposed mental limits so that I can access my lexicon further and more rapidly. My physical health has also not but increased beyond even my wildest dreams during this time, so while I have observed that burned plant material, in the form of smoke conveys carcinogens into the meatsuit, it would appear (probably based on zillions of years of ancestors inhaling camp fires, forest fires, volcanic debris, etc) that the body is supremely capable of remediating any of the negative physiological outcomes as long as proper, biologically appropriate, molecularly intact inputs (food, air, sun, water, love) are intaken in sufficient amounts.

I would also like to dispel any rumors which are plain bullshit right now regarding modern cannabis versus ancient cannabis. The OG's and the Blue Dreams and the Skunks of today are merely shiny new recombinations. The genetic potential was likely always there in those ancient varieties and I want you to understand that out in the forests of vietnam for example, there are plants 50-100ft tall that will produce 10-50lbs of cannabis that would give many entheogens such as psilocybe strains, panaeolus strains and ergot derivatives a run for their currencies. Meaning it is a complete myth that today's cannabis are more xyz...more potent, more damaging, more yadda yadda. If the people of northern california could try some weed directly out of the jungles of thailand, africa, and vietnam, they would immediately be put to shame for the mediocrity of their modern, supposed, hi-potency advents.

The reason I'm so tired of hearing that myth repeated is because it is truly a shame that due to legal climate, virtually no one, and I mean this, with the exception perhaps of strains like Red Dragon  (a sativa, and I know of no other in the US that will yield 19 pounds if started indoors in california and then finished outdoors where it will supass the height of nearby powerlines and the effects of this strain still do not approach those grown pure, in the jungles), is growing anything even remotely close to what exists out there.

Now. I realize when we get into it, that one may consider even the ancient strains to be your definition of 'overbred', however, I would caution one with this view when, in the course of my studies on the occult which presently rule this plane, it has become readily apparent that these entheogens (cannabis, teonanctl, mescalito, etc) very well may have been essentially gifted to us as catalysts for growth and transmutations of the spirit from the base lead of the animas to the spiritual gold that exists in a unified population viz a viz Rupert Sheldrake's Morphic Resonance and studies on so called telepathy.

I do not personally feel there exists evidence in other words, that you can compare the selective breeding of cannabis with that of the modern tomato or apple for example. Though, in the pursuit of truth and accurate perception, I'm willing to be wrong if the state of things so dictate...

Offline HelpMeToHelpEwe

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Re: Marijuana and the FUTURE OF FOOD
« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2016, 05:23:36 am »
Also Rogue, you must not be that hungry since I offered your lady compensation in the form of this plant for a service she did me when I was growing in NorCal and it was rebuffed through silence.  Offer stand although I will not extend it again, it is just there...And for the sake of this forum, all local, perceived 'legalities' will be observed in said transfer...

Modified: Regarding mushrooms, those available in a city near your might be 'domesticated' but it was only 20-50 years ago that the *overwhelming majority* of present day psilocybe and panaeolus strains which are now abundant on the web, were brought out of obscurity from the cow shit fields of cambodia, india, thailand, philippines, south america, central america, mexico, etc etc ad nauseum. Meaning that while web-purchased spores may be epigenetic domestics (and short term at that with only a few hundred or thousand generations possible given the average 4-6 month maturation schedule) given the aforementioned time frame, the originals are growing RIGHT NOW in places such as Uruguay (nov-dec cubensis mushroom season) and panama. Untampered, unbred, and probably co-evolving epigenetically along with the local human and animal populations... Oh yes, I forgot strains like cyanescens which, in the PNW are STILL growing all over kingdom come, on their preferred medium of rotting wood and such. Meaning absolutely ZERO manipulation...
« Last Edit: December 11, 2016, 05:33:40 am by HelpMeToHelpEwe »

 

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