Author Topic: Dioxin in sheep liver  (Read 261 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ddk926

  • Forager
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Dioxin in sheep liver
« on: October 06, 2018, 06:23:41 am »
Hi,

just got myself some grass fed liver from my local farmers market. Now i read about sheep liver having high dioxin levels in the past. The articles mention sheep accumulating alot because of their metabolism (more so than other ruminants)

I am somewhat worried now. This seems to be a problem only in germany.

https://mobil.bfr.bund.de/cm/349/sheeps_liver_may_be_highly_contaminated_with_dioxins_and_pcbs.pdf

What do you think? Legit concern or fearmongering?

Offline sabertooth

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,926
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Dioxin in sheep liver
« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2018, 11:55:40 am »
Seems like a dubious article, that does not clearly establish proper controls, does not distinguish between factory farmed animals and pasture raised, nor does it acknowledge the plethora of other variables likely involved. 

Parts of industrialized Europe are likely contaminated, and sheep raised in these areas may accumulate higher levels of pollution in their organs....especially if the animals are being fed industrial feeds, drinking from contaminated water, living on poor overgrazed pastures.

There is some kind of false perception being sold about the EU standards being something legitimate and trustworthy. Though many organisations do provide a baseline level of oversight which prevents the most blatant forms of food contamination, generally speaking the systems of regulation, regardless of what part of the world should be viewed with scepticism and be subject to independent scrutiny.

I doubt those animals tested in this report would in any way relate to the quality of animals raised outside the scope of the standard commercial livestock paradigme. The organs of animals raised in uncontaminated areas, drinking from pure water sources and grazed on unpolluted and lush pastures should be just fine.

I encourage people to take personal responsibility in finding these pristine sources for themselves, and try at all cost to avoid having to give blind trust over to faceless regulators that oversee food production operations that are hidden from public view.
A man who makes a beast of himself, forgets the pain of being a man.

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk