Author Topic: Parmigiano-Reggiano  (Read 599 times)

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Offline primal tyler

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Parmigiano-Reggiano
« on: February 04, 2019, 12:05:43 am »
this cheese is supposed to be made from raw milk with animal rennet so that is fine but it is heated to 130 degrees Fahrenheit, so raw cheese is still a cooked food? Aajonus said dairy should not be heated past 102 degrees Fahrenheit

Offline dariorpl

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Re: Parmigiano-Reggiano
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2019, 03:25:14 am »
He also said most commercially produced so-called raw cheeses aren't really raw
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Online TylerDurden

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Re: Parmigiano-Reggiano
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2019, 03:33:58 am »
He also said most commercially produced so-called raw cheeses aren't really raw
That is partially true as some so-called "raw" cheeses  , such as "Pont-L'Eveque" are actually partially pasteurised.  But if one does one's research, one can find  genuinely raw cheeses.
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Offline dariorpl

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Re: Parmigiano-Reggiano
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2019, 04:27:40 am »
That is partially true as some so-called "raw" cheeses  , such as "Pont-L'Eveque" are actually partially pasteurised.  But if one does one's research, one can find  genuinely raw cheeses.

Research isn't enough, you have to talk to the producer and even then they may lie or may not be sure how high the temperature gets during the process.

Even harder than finding raw cheese, is finding no-salt-added raw cheese. Most of the time, if buying cheese, you have to accept that some salt will be added during the process. Especially since the only commercially available natural rennet (as far as I know) contains up to 97% salt.
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Offline norawnofun

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Re: Parmigiano-Reggiano
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2019, 03:25:37 am »
The normal body temperature of dairy animals is usually between 37-38 C and can fluctuate according to the weather. That is usually also in the temperature range that the milk would flow through the udder getting to the baby. Humans have a similar temperature range. If you have a temperature higher than around 38, it´s would be considered fever that, according to the general knowledge, kills viruses and bacteria as a consequence. It would make sense to say that raw milk heated above 38 is overheated and the enzymes start to degrade, because nature never meant to give us milk higher than that range.

According to Dr. Edward Howells book "Enzyme Nutrition: The Food Enzyme Concept", all enzymes are considered dead above 117 F (48.22 C.) So any cheese that is heated above 38 C, will degrade in enzymes, to the point where it´s a dead product. I used to eat raw cheeses thinking they were raw, especially when the package said made from raw milk. The problem is that many producers start with raw milk, then heat it up to create their cheese. So the end product cannot be called raw cheese anymore. I have noticed that many so called raw cheese producers have no clue about the true term of raw, but still use that term. The only way to find out if it´s truly raw is to contact them, ideally via email, since many sellers first need to contact the ppl in charge of the production process, and ask until what degree their product is heated to. Don´t waste your time asking if their cheese is raw. As far as I know any cheese in the US can be called raw if its below pasteurization temperature. No comment. And it´s true that almost all store bought cheeses are made with salt, sometimes even table salt. Making your own is easy, cheaper and often healthier.

Online TylerDurden

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Re: Parmigiano-Reggiano
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2019, 03:30:57 am »
In  my early days when I still consumed raw dairy, I had no problem with salted raw dairy. After all, they want to prolong the product's existence somewhat. As long as one is not consuming other salted products, I don't see the problem. The trouble also is with various countries' laws - for example, the UK allows honey to be labelled raw as long as it is "only" heated for a short time to 80 degrees Celsius, which is ridiculous.
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Offline ivanrk

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Re: Parmigiano-Reggiano
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2019, 08:38:22 am »
this cheese is supposed to be made from raw milk with animal rennet so that is fine but it is heated to 130 degrees Fahrenheit, so raw cheese is still a cooked food? Aajonus said dairy should not be heated past 102 degrees Fahrenheit

You have to find not just unpasteurised cheese - it have to be uncooked type - parmiggiano is cooked cheese. Uncooked are brie, camembert, morbier, tomme cheeses, cheddar, reblochon and many others especially french. Pecorino romano is cooked but i think pecorino sardo is not. Gouda is cooked type.
Parmiggiano is not so bad - it it is aged 30 months proteins are almost completely predigested by bacteria and it is good.
But most cheeses called parmesan are aged less than year. If it is aged at least 1 year it can be called parmiggiano but still not all parmiggiano are 24 or 30 months aged. 12 months aging period is not enough to broke down the casein - at least for parmiggiano that is made from cow milk. I am not sure about perocino romano - it is aged less than 1 year but it is sheeps milk so different type of casein and maybe easy to digest.



 

Offline Kaaris

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Re: Parmigiano-Reggiano
« Reply #7 on: February 28, 2019, 06:51:47 am »
What about Fourme d’Ambert? It’s a raw blue cheese from France. I just bought a little less than a pound of that. It’s an incredible cheese.

 

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