Author Topic: Uruguyan beef  (Read 956 times)

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Offline Iguana

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Uruguyan beef
« on: November 21, 2021, 03:56:59 pm »
Does anybody know if the beef from Uruguay is 100% grass fed ? Or is it "grain  finished" like in Argentina ?
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline dariorpl

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2022, 09:42:43 pm »
I suspect it will depend on the supplier. In my experience, both in Argentina and Uruguay, in megaurban areas, most of the beef is grain finished, and some is fully grain fed. I have limited experience with Uruguay however.

That's not to say there is no truly grassfed beef, but it's hard to come by and you should know who you're buying from.

Another thing you should consider is that much of what is called "grass-fed" or "pasture-fed" while technically may not be feedlot grain finished, might still be grain/legume fed right in the fields. For example, I know of plenty of producers in Argentina that raise export quality beef, that is usually not sold here, and they call it pasture fed. Much of this receives complemental soy and other grains along with the grasses.

Most of the grasses/pastures in many of these operations are sown however, and are often GMO and sprayed to keep out competing "weeds".

Even if they're not GMO and sprayed, it's often not grass at all, but legumes like alfalfa. Keep in mind cattle fed solely on raw green legumes, is at severe risk of dying from overproduction of foam in one of their stomachs, so they often must be treated with antibiotics and other chemicals, or have on-site emergency surgery to keep it from dying. Being fed legumes however makes them grow and put on weight faster, since legumes have a much higher protein content.

There is a chance that grain finished might be superior quality to some of these "grass fed" / "pasture fed" since most of the grain finished beef spends the first 5-6 months on truly 100% wild grasses, before being sent to the feedlot for bulking up for the last 3 months or so.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2022, 09:48:13 pm by dariorpl »
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Offline Iguana

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2022, 11:13:58 pm »
Thank you for replying!
I just found this interesting page https://dialogochino.net/en/agriculture/uruguay-strategy-boost-beef-china-lessen-footprint/
which underlines "10% of Uruguay's livestock is raised in feedlots, compared to around 70% in neighbouring Argentina"
This is confirmed here: http://uruguayanmeats.uy/five-reasons-to-believe/
and here: https://www.choicesmagazine.org/2007-1/foodchains/2007-1-03.htm
Quote
Uruguay beef serves as an example of one industry's effort to obtain international certification for its grass-fed beef production system. Certification, in conjunction with Uruguay's already highly developed cattle identification and tracking system (the DICOSE system), is viewed as central in the development of a national brand image for Uruguayan beef, analogous to that associated with New Zealand lamb.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2022, 11:22:11 pm by Iguana »
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline dariorpl

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2022, 01:38:35 am »
I wonder what they mean by 70% of argentinian beef raised in feedlots. If they mean feedlot-finished, that could certainly be correct, and an even higher number might be reasonable.

But what is typically meant by "feedlot raised" in Argentina is cattle being feedlot-fed from weaning or shortly thereafter (with the mother often also being feedlot-fed). By that standard I'd say it's probably under 30%.

Unfortunately I can't recommend a source that I trust for you to buy from. I will let you know if that changes, I plan on starting a cattle ranch/farm in Argentina soon. Part of my reason for that is that it's too hard to find reliable good sources of beef.
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Offline Iguana

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2022, 02:36:34 am »
Do you live in Argentina?

I started about a month ago to eat the Uruguayan beef that is sometimes found in supermarkets here. As far as i can tell, it's excellent and it hasn't caused me any troubles.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline dariorpl

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2022, 06:22:22 am »
I do live in Argentina. Buenos Aires.

I usually have no problems with supermarket meat, but I'm fully aware that it's grain finished.

Is the fat in the beef you eat tasty, yellow, soft and buttery? Or is it white, like a paste and tasteless? And does it vary by cut?

Is the meat soft and jell-o like, or more structured and harder to chew?

Does the meat have a lot of taste and smell if fresh? Or is it like chewing tasteless jell-o?
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Offline Iguana

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2022, 10:43:31 pm »
There was a coat of under-skin fat which I didn't eat because it was hard and not tasty. Also I don't eat the fat if i'm not 100 % sure the meat is completely alright.

I don't know what Jell-o is, we don't have it in Europe, but the meat was fine and tasty after one - two weeks hung in my fridge with a fan.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline dariorpl

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2022, 04:43:43 am »
In my experience all beef is tasty when dried like that. Was it tasty when fresh?

Jell-o is a gelatin dessert/gel, it looks like this:



What I meant when I asked if the muscle meat is like that, is that grain fed and sometimes grain finished beef will be very soft and jiggly, and lack taste.

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Offline Iguana

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2022, 04:33:28 pm »
I ate some when fresh and it was also tasty. Not soft, not at all like that jelly l, but rather like the other meats I've eaten raw, such as wild boar, deer or... kangaroo.

As far as I can tell, that Uruguayan beef is fine, totally alright.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline dariorpl

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #9 on: January 06, 2022, 08:33:14 pm »
That's good to know Iguana. Next time I'm in Uruguay I'll let you know what it was like. What area are/were you in?

If you feel like it, you could share some pictures of what it looks like, if you're still there

EDIT: Oh I'm dumb, you're in Europe and buying from Uruguay. It's highly likely that exports from Uruguay to Europe are higher quality than beef found in megaurban uruguayan supermarkets.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2022, 08:39:39 pm by dariorpl »
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Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2022, 10:02:20 am »
I have often mentioned in the past,  i hope and beleieve on this forum as well that Uruguay is a high potential country for a primal paradise, the weather is perfect for growing pasture, tons of water, temperate subtropical intermediary climate, 5 cows per human and high quality of life and low crime for a 34d world country. Also for anyone traveling in USA aldis super market here in USA has Grass fed beef from Australia and Uruguay. The Australian beef doesn't taste anywhere near as good.  They also have food grass fed steaks at 10 dollars a pound, us grown ribeys and ny strip.

Offline political atheist

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2022, 03:27:59 pm »
I have often mentioned in the past,  i hope and beleieve on this forum as well that Uruguay is a high potential country for a primal paradise, the weather is perfect for growing pasture, tons of water, temperate subtropical intermediary climate, 5 cows per human and high quality of life and low crime for a 34d world country. Also for anyone traveling in USA aldis super market here in USA has Grass fed beef from Australia and Uruguay. The Australian beef doesn't taste anywhere near as good.  They also have food grass fed steaks at 10 dollars a pound, us grown ribeys and ny strip.

It is warm/hot all year round? Can you walk around in a t shirt  or topless during winter/autumn?

Does grass grow during winter/autumn, for food for cattle/cows?
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Offline RogueFarmer

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Re: Uruguyan beef
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2022, 11:11:54 pm »
it's warm enough to walk around in a t shirt in winter/autumn though I'm not sure if it will be comfortable but the grass does grow year round yes.

 

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