Author Topic: how does mineral content of vegetables compare to meat  (Read 3482 times)

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Offline fuggles

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how does mineral content of vegetables compare to meat
« on: April 08, 2010, 09:05:43 am »
i make a simple of soup of simply boiling celery and adding in a carrot

if I made the same soup with mashed up chicken bones, which is higher in minerals ?

because i heard celery is high in minerals also, and I heard it was a good way to get them in my diet since i am deficient at the moment

Offline kurite

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Re: how does mineral content of vegetables compare to meat
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2010, 10:14:02 am »
The one with chicken bones heres an article about it.
http://www.westonaprice.org/Broth-is-Beautiful.html
"A government big enough to give you everything you want is a government big enough to take from you everything you have."

Offline fuggles

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Re: how does mineral content of vegetables compare to meat
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2010, 05:17:15 pm »
thanks

thats all a bit complicated

cant you just turn the bones into powder and throw them in vegetable soup ?

Offline Roselene

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Re: how does mineral content of vegetables compare to meat
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2010, 06:27:00 pm »
i make a simple of soup of simply boiling celery and adding in a carrot

if I made the same soup with mashed up chicken bones, which is higher in minerals ?

because i heard celery is high in minerals also, and I heard it was a good way to get them in my diet since i am deficient at the moment

I never heard of cooked celery on a RAF diet other than Susun Weed.  She's an herbalist.  She makes herbal tinctures and calls ripe fruit cooked.  She says to cook vegetables to make them digestible and I guess eat meat raw.  She specifies that it's vegetables that need cooking and that she does eat a little animal food and recommends to eat her way.  She has some good information on her sites, but you likely know that.  Your diet is like hers.  Do you call fruit too ripe too?  

Do you juice raw vegetables and drink them?  Are carrots paleo?  A paleo medicinal herb I presume.

I don't recommend the chicken broth you propose.  What are your intentions other than minerals?  What minerals is your health deficient in?

Offline Sitting Coyote

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Re: how does mineral content of vegetables compare to meat
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2010, 12:35:39 am »
One big issue that I think you're missing is how vegetables are grown and how that influences mineral content. 

Vegetables grown in depleted soil will be mineral deficient, no matter what type of vegetable they are.  Most of the vegetables you buy at the grocery store--even organic ones--have been grown on land that is probably quite depleted of its minerals.  Hence, most commercially available vegetables are deficient.

Wild plants are generally more mineral dense.  Meat is mineral dense because animals concentrate minerals through eating lots of whatever plants or other animals, and retaining some of the minerals in their various tissues.

If you are mineral deficient, I'd recommend incorporating wild foods into your diet, particularly animal foods.

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: how does mineral content of vegetables compare to meat
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2010, 08:24:38 am »


Vegetables grown in depleted soil will be mineral deficient, no matter what type of vegetable they are.  Most of the vegetables you buy at the grocery store--even organic ones--have been grown on land that is probably quite depleted of its minerals.  Hence, most commercially available vegetables are deficient.

Wild plants are generally more mineral dense.  Meat is mineral dense because animals concentrate minerals through eating lots of whatever plants or other animals, and retaining some of the minerals in their various tissues.



Brixing fruits and veggies generally is a pretty good indicator of their relative nutritional content. Some grocery store fruits/veggies are actually high quality.  Some are very low in nutrition. A $40 Brixmeter/refractometer will tell you the difference.  Take a look at www.crossroads.ws.

 

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