Author Topic: Hunting  (Read 47027 times)

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Offline stevesurv

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Hunting
« on: August 07, 2008, 06:08:45 am »
Does anyone here hunt? I'm taking my hunter's safety course in September and plan to start killin' deer and hogs in October. Depending on how successful I am, it should cut my food bill way down. It makes sense to me for one to be able to hunt there own food. Besides, given the current state of the U.S. economy, I feel much better not having to depend on someone else for sustenance.

Offline ezekiel

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2008, 06:25:43 am »
i don't hunt, but i would like to....i was thinking about finding birds eggs in spring time.....but that might be risky because birds may eat insects contaminated from sprays and lead in the soil

Offline PaleoKyle

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2008, 06:36:00 am »
I was just thinking about hunting this past week. I have a month off during hunting season, and was looking at places to get some deer. Where would you hunt? I would most likely go to North central Pennsylvania. Would you try to dismantle the deer yourself?

My dream is to make a fresh kill and eat the organs on the spot like our paleo ancestors. It is also one way to finally get a brain.  ;D

Offline ezekiel

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2008, 06:37:57 am »

My dream is to make a fresh kill and eat the organs on the spot like our paleo ancestors. It is also one way to finally get a brain.  ;D
That would be my dream too.

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2008, 06:41:36 am »
I agree  ;D

Don't think I could eat that many organs though, I would have to have some people to share with! Any takers?  :D

Satya

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2008, 06:43:19 am »
I don't hunt yet, but I have taken hunter safety and have a compound bow.

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2008, 06:44:36 am »
What do you guys think about setting traps for squirrels in my yard?
Would that even be worth it, or are they like rabbits with not enough fat?

Do you think paleo man used traps?

Satya

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2008, 06:48:39 am »
Evidence is that paleo wo/man used traps, for fish and land game.

Offline PaleoKyle

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2008, 07:01:41 am »
What do you guys think about setting traps for squirrels in my yard?
Would that even be worth it, or are they like rabbits with not enough fat?

Do you think paleo man used traps?

Unless you live in a very remote spot, I would be worried about what the animal had been eating.

Maybe you could dig a ditch in your back yard and cover it with twigs and branches and then try to coax a deer across it by playing highway noises on the other side.
 ;D

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2008, 07:06:37 am »
i lol'd  :D

Yeah, what you mentioned was a concern of mine as well.
Where I'm staying at right now (with my parents over summer) is a golf course community.
The golf course shut down maybe a year and a half ago and has been allowed to grow wild ever since.
I loved taking walks on the courses and riding my bike on the paths in all its overgrown glory.
However, they decided to reopen the course this September, so lately there's been a whole lot of mowing and cutting and digging and spraying and it's just SO not cool!  >:(  haha

Offline stevesurv

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2008, 09:42:19 am »
I was just thinking about hunting this past week. I have a month off during hunting season, and was looking at places to get some deer. Where would you hunt? I would most likely go to North central Pennsylvania. Would you try to dismantle the deer yourself?

My dream is to make a fresh kill and eat the organs on the spot like our paleo ancestors. It is also one way to finally get a brain.  ;D


Yes I'm gonna get me couple of big bites out of the liver of whatever animal I kill. I will be cleaning it in the field with the help of a couple new friends of mine who's lease I'll be hunting on and load the big chest freezer I'll have with me.

Offline akaikumo

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2008, 01:32:26 pm »
I agree  ;D

Don't think I could eat that many organs though, I would have to have some people to share with! Any takers?  :D

Suddenly I'm seeing organized hunting sessions  8)
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anais Nin

Offline stevesurv

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2008, 07:33:14 pm »
Suddenly I'm seeing organized hunting sessions  8)

That would be the bomb diggity.

Offline Dan

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2008, 04:39:06 pm »
I've been looking for this topic, but I was too scared to start it!

What I've had of wild game has been excellent, except a deer that got way too warm (that was a long time ago), and wild geese that were just too ...wild... tasting.  I've only ate a few things raw, but the best so far was antelope (the raw was an accident).  Deer is good, and I have all sorts of birds in the freezer to try. 

I haven't figured out what to do to get enough fat from deer though.  All the muscular fat (at least on my last one) was very sticky, almost impossible to eat, and when cooked, practically turned into super glue that could stick a spatula to a skillet.  The other fat was a giant slab over the hind part of the back.  Is that what we should be eating?  I wussed out on the marrow too, because of the smell.  I'm not sure what's normal.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2008, 04:44:46 pm »
Yeah,the fat on the back is fine to eat.

As for the marrow, I found deer marrow to be the best-tasting of all marrows(no doubt due to wild foraging enhancing nutrient-levels). Admittedly, the creamier marrow(from the lower leg, according to Stefansson)  needs to be stored almost immediately in the fridge at high temperature as it deteriorates quite quickly, otherwise. The drier marrow from the humerus/femur should last a little longer before needing refrigeration(but doesn't taste as good as the former).
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
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Offline Dan

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2008, 05:04:28 pm »
It was about 20 degrees F when I cleaned it, and was only thawed at the edges when I butchered it (40 degrees).  The only reason I was anywhere near the marrow was I didn't know what I was doing, but it was a more distinctive smell than the rest of the deer.  I'll be sure to try it next year. 

Offline Dan

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #16 on: August 09, 2008, 08:26:09 am »
I was wondering if anyone else has an urge to do this.


It was posted in the exercise topic.

Humans hot, sweaty, natural-born runners

Monday’s cool-weather marathon wouldn’t bring down game
By Alvin Powell
Harvard News Office
Hairless, clawless, and largely weaponless, ancient humans used the unlikely combination of sweatiness and relentlessness to gain the upper hand over their faster, stronger, generally more dangerous animal prey, Harvard Anthropology Professor Daniel Lieberman said Thursday (April 12).

http://www.physorg.com/news95954919.html








Offline akaikumo

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #17 on: August 09, 2008, 01:29:48 pm »
That would be pretty damn cool.
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anais Nin

Offline TruthHunter

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Re: Hunting - Practical
« Reply #18 on: August 11, 2008, 09:48:20 pm »
Someone commented on  collecting  wild  bird eggs.  This is likely to be highly illegal as most birds are protected. Unless you live in a heavy agricultural area, pesticides aren't much of an issue.  I wouldn't want to eat city pigeons though, though with baiting, they would be easy to snare.
There used to be a lot of hunting, but costs and crowding have cut way back. Unless you can hunt on national forest land in your own state(USA at least) licenses and leases can make it a rich man's game. 

In the south bag limits on deer in some counties are amazing - nearly unlimited. Wild hogs are unprotected, but very wary.  Unless you are a very good hunter with good locations, it can be pretty hit and miss - mostly miss. Unless you are very experienced it can be very time consuming to scout out locations and actually find something.  In some areas(Texas) feeding is allowed, which guarantees success.  However, nearly all hunting is on leased land.  Its not unheard of to sneak a salt block to encourage showing up.

A group effort can be useful. join a drive.

In squirrel used to be common fare in the south. They could never be hunted to scarcity.  Ugh! - Rats with tails!  :)  If you put out bird feed and don't make it too squirrel proof you can get almost unlimited squirrels. Just don't let them see others in the traps.

If costs are your concern, I would go Neolithic and raise your own. Rabbits are quiet and can be raise in the city.  Chickens are a bit noisy.  Doves are pretty quiet.  You could raise quail and feed them on earthworms and crickets to get away from a totally grain fed meat. I would look into aquaponics as a way to raise both fish and Veggies.

I don't think I will go this way though I could. I have deer moving through my backyard nearly every morning. Also rabbits and plenty of turtles, alligators,and fish in my pond and the nearby canal.  I'm too much of a Vegetarian!
I really don't enjoy ending another life even to eat, though I have hunted and fished at times.

John

Satya

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Re: Hunting - Practical
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2008, 10:25:37 pm »
I'm too much of a Vegetarian!
I really don't enjoy ending another life even to eat, though I have hunted and fished at times.

John,

If you are not interested in consuming animal products, then why have you joined a board whose members eat mainly raw animal foods?  Is it to debate us on our choices? 

If you are seriously interested in pursuing a diet with raw animal foods, yet find some ideological issues with it, I highly recommend that you read The Ethics of Eating Meat, by Charles Eisenstein.  He has picked apart the usual arguments, and he was very instrumental in helping me dispel some of the vegan myths when I went back to eating animal foods after about 8 years vegetarian (almost 6 years ago). 

http://www.westonaprice.org/healthissues/ethicsmeat.html

BTW, my kids are so happy to be omnivorous again; and I am so glad that I was an omnivore from before conception well into over age 5 for the yougest. 
« Last Edit: August 11, 2008, 10:27:26 pm by Satya »

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #20 on: August 12, 2008, 02:07:48 am »
Quote
I'm too much of a Vegetarian!
I really don't enjoy ending another life even to eat, though I have hunted and fished at times.

You do realize that the plants you eat are alive right?
And that they got their nutrition from dead animals.

I'll never understand the ethical reasonings of a vegetarian.
A life is a life is a life.

Satya

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #21 on: August 12, 2008, 02:24:41 am »
You do realize that the plants you eat are alive right?
And that they got their nutrition from dead animals.

Keith, fruitarians eat only the fruit of a plant, which would fall off anyway.  But it is true that the cycle of life is beautiful in that plants feed off of decaying animals, animals eat the plants, other animals eat them ...  And don't forget about all the bacteria, yeasts and other beings.  Life requires death.  Period.

Offline boxcarguy07

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #22 on: August 12, 2008, 02:27:45 am »
And don't forget about all the bacteria, yeasts and other beings.  Life requires death.  Period.

I sure haven't forgotten about those little guys! How could I? They are my friends  ;D
We're only as healthy as the health of the soil

Offline Dan

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Re: Hunting - Practical
« Reply #23 on: August 12, 2008, 04:10:38 pm »
Someone commented on  collecting  wild  bird eggs.  This is likely to be highly illegal as most birds are protected. Unless you live in a heavy agricultural area, pesticides aren't much of an issue.  I wouldn't want to eat city pigeons though, though with baiting, they would be easy to snare.
There used to be a lot of hunting, but costs and crowding have cut way back. Unless you can hunt on national forest land in your own state(USA at least) licenses and leases can make it a rich man's game. 

In the south bag limits on deer in some counties are amazing - nearly unlimited. Wild hogs are unprotected, but very wary.  Unless you are a very good hunter with good locations, it can be pretty hit and miss - mostly miss. Unless you are very experienced it can be very time consuming to scout out locations and actually find something.  In some areas(Texas) feeding is allowed, which guarantees success.  However, nearly all hunting is on leased land.  Its not unheard of to sneak a salt block to encourage showing up.

A group effort can be useful. join a drive.

In squirrel used to be common fare in the south. They could never be hunted to scarcity.  Ugh! - Rats with tails!  :)  If you put out bird feed and don't make it too squirrel proof you can get almost unlimited squirrels. Just don't let them see others in the traps.

If costs are your concern, I would go Neolithic and raise your own. Rabbits are quiet and can be raise in the city.  Chickens are a bit noisy.  Doves are pretty quiet.  You could raise quail and feed them on earthworms and crickets to get away from a totally grain fed meat. I would look into aquaponics as a way to raise both fish and Veggies.

I don't think I will go this way though I could. I have deer moving through my backyard nearly every morning. Also rabbits and plenty of turtles, alligators,and fish in my pond and the nearby canal.  I'm too much of a Vegetarian!
I really don't enjoy ending another life even to eat, though I have hunted and fished at times.

John



It is getting harder to find places to hunt these days, but you can still do it a lot cheaper than buying meat outright.  Licenses aren't too bad, if you go for that type of stuff (I'm just trying to be realistic here), and to be affordable, you'll have to do something other than leases.  Homegrown veggies and some meat might be an option with older folks, things like that.


If you learn how to shoot well, and have even the foggiest clue about where things like deer are in you area, it's almost impossible to miss, provided you're not trophy hunting or something.




Offline stevesurv

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Re: Hunting
« Reply #24 on: August 12, 2008, 06:12:48 pm »
It's especially cheaper if you hook up with some very kind folks who already have a lease and a rifle to borrow. From what I hear about their lease, that land hadn't been hunted on for about five years, so it's prime right now. Yippee! Meat on the table, baby.

 

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