Author Topic: my so called journal  (Read 101368 times)

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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #225 on: March 06, 2011, 04:28:05 am »
plenty of scientists' careers have been ruined solely because they focused on subjects which were frowned upon by the establishment. I can't imagine, for example, that doctors who promote raw diets would be held in high esteem by the pharmaceutical industry, for example - similiarly, vets promoting a raw diet would encounter difficulties with colleagues in the pay of the pet-food-industry etc

I intend on doing just such research so I will find out if there is such a conspiracy going on.

One interesting things Dr. Breslin (my probable advisor) said is that a guy who came up with something called the Fireman's Diet or something like that was supposedly threatened by a group of cardiologists saying they would go out of business by that diet. I don't know if that's true or if that diet really would do that much, but my point is that he seems to accept that there are at least suggestions of forces against such research.

Ionnna, thanks!

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #226 on: March 06, 2011, 04:42:52 am »
I intend on doing just such research so I will find out if there is such a conspiracy going on.

One interesting things Dr. Breslin (my probable advisor) said is that a guy who came up with something called the Fireman's Diet or something like that was supposedly threatened by a group of cardiologists saying they would go out of business by that diet. I don't know if that's true or if that diet really would do that much, but my point is that he seems to accept that there are at least suggestions of forces against such research.

Ionnna, thanks!
  I don't think there is any overt conspiracy, as such.  In the case of vets, for example, veterinary courses at university and onwards are, apparently, largely funded by the pet-food industry, with much of the coursework therefore being weighted in favour , such as nutrition lessons focusing primarily on processed pet foods/grains etc. - hardly surprisingly, therefore, most vets get "trained" to ignore other viewpoints that would work better. Similiarly, doctors don't do much studying of nutrition(Aajonus says it's something like 4 to 6! hours during the course of their entire training!) yet health agencies actually once tried to ban anybody without a medical degree  from working as a nutritionist in California.

Also, I have a doctor uncle who works for the UK government, and, unsurprisingly, follows standard doctrine on every possible aspect of medicine, so frowns on homeopathy/herbal medicine etc., smiles patronisingly if I ever mention my raw diet etc. - I can't blame him having no creative intelligence as, since he is not a private doctor, he could be vulnerable to being fired if he had an original thought and, say, promoted homeopathic remedies. Some hardline fundamentalists among doctors/scientists have openly criticised such advocates of alternative medicine in public...
« Last Edit: March 07, 2011, 01:29:09 am by TylerDurden »
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Offline Dima

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #227 on: March 06, 2011, 05:04:33 am »
Just met with what will probably be my faculty adviser. He just decided last week he wants to write a grant proposal to test this diet called "nutritarian" vs. the traditional care for very sick cardiac patients at UMDNJ.

My goal as I see it now is to do a good job with that and slowly introduce to him paleolithic and maybe raw diet ideas so that I can steer his next project, or my thesis project, towards something closer to what I believe in. Any ideas?

In particular he seems convinced studies like this haven't really been done yet, clinical at least, there have been statistical studies done on populations like the China thing.

If you guys could help me find old studies or anything that I could learn about to help steer this lab towards my ideas that would be much appreciated.

I live in the area. I'll gladly be a test subject, if your ideas come to fruition!

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #228 on: March 06, 2011, 10:13:52 pm »
I live in the area. I'll gladly be a test subject, if your ideas come to fruition!

Thanks for the offer!

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #229 on: March 24, 2011, 05:56:41 am »
It's looking like I'm going to do rotations in different faculty labs in the Fall, Winter, Spring or all three. One faculty member already likes an idea of mine for a vitamin D study (that's what she does) about the difference in efficacy of vitamin D from supplements and from food. I'm trying to design it so that there are regular D2 and D3 pills being given, the spray that Mercola sells (seems like the best D supplement out there) and then some food with a measurable amount of D. The food or the Mercola supp will inevitably win in looking at blood serum levels because the food has fat in it to help it absorb, and the Mercola supp doesn't have to be digested as it's sprayed under the tongue and goes into the blood vessels there.

If she likes that and all goes well I might have something published by the end of the year or maybe next year about Vitamin D. There's also a faculty member that does a lot of Vitamin A research with a mouse lab that wants me for rotation, and a guy that does lipid enzyme research that works mostly with microbes and cells. I've also got the first faculty member I met Dr. Breslin, I almost joined his lab right away but decided to do rotations, so I'll try his lab out. And lastly there's a faculty member I wasn't able to meet but some students after hearing my interests (paleo diet etc) said I should meet him. One of his research interests was environmental toxins effecting food absorption or something like that. He has some other stuff going on that is pretty close to what I'm interested in.

Offline Ioanna

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #230 on: March 24, 2011, 07:45:14 am »
sounds great, kyle!  keep us updated on your findings!!

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #231 on: March 29, 2011, 08:07:28 am »
I've been having a stubborn skin infection. Started off looking like ringworm which I've gotten a couple of times from bjj but hasn't gone away. I had something on my hand in early December, it started going away, then in mid-December I went to Nicaragua for a week and it came back full force and I got something similar to it on other spots. They stayed for months, but by the time I went to a doctor about it they were almost completely faded. The hyper-pigmentation never went away though. Just this weekend I got those spots in other places again, and it looks like the thing on my hand might be starting up again. I tried an over the counter tolnaftate (anti-fungal) to no avail and the thing that I think eventually faded away the last batch was putting nail polish on them (definitely not ideal). So now here I am again, with faded remains of the earlier spots and new ones appearing, having no idea why this is happening. I've been pretty good about low carb recently, better than usual actually, and have been getting a good amount of fat. I haven't been doing anything particular for skin care, and I should be getting more fresh air on my skin, but it's cold here and I don't know if I could reasonably do that. I also use very little soap when showering, I only really soap my arm pits and crotch and sometimes feet cause that's the only spots that really sweat and eventually smell.

Ideas or suggestions?

Offline Josh

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #232 on: March 29, 2011, 03:07:53 pm »
I can only suggest giving up soap completely.

Also, when you say 'good' about low carb...do you mean sometimes you go off the wagon?...because I've found if I've been low carb, then have a lot it's thrown my system right out.

Offline sabertooth

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #233 on: March 29, 2011, 03:27:17 pm »
I think regular tanning bed sessions will kill of fungal infections like ring worm. If you try twice a week for a month or so you should see improvement.

I used to get ring worms around the time I got real sick, I think such infections could indicate overall lowered immunity, whatever the cause, sun bathing should boost the immune system and promote healthy skin overall. Especially after not getting much sun through the winter months.

I will also cover myself with coconut oil after each session , I think the oil protects the skin , plus it locks in the fat soluble vitamin D that's generated on the skins surface. Its also important to not let your skin get dry when you have fungal infections, and too much bathing with soap and water can strip the skin of its immunity factors and natural protective oils and leave you open to such infections.

Kill the fungus with UV rays, and then smother it out the rest of the way with a clean oil,and your ring worm should go away.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2011, 03:35:43 pm by sabertooth »
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Offline Josh

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #234 on: March 29, 2011, 04:16:58 pm »
This sounds weird, but has anyone thought about licking their skin, like other mammals?

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #235 on: March 30, 2011, 09:50:30 am »
This sounds weird, but has anyone thought about licking their skin, like other mammals?

Do they do that when infected with ringworm and such?

Offline Josh

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #236 on: March 30, 2011, 01:32:11 pm »
Ah no sorry Kyle. I was responding to the vitamin D point. Apparently mammals lick their fur to get vit D. Sabertooth seemed to imply it was on the surface of human skin which I don't know about.

Who knows though? Some people say spit has healing properties.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 03:11:22 pm by Josh »

Offline sabertooth

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #237 on: March 30, 2011, 07:31:46 pm »


The photosynthesis of vitamin D evolved over 750 million years ago; the phytoplankton coccolithophor Emeliani huxleii is an early example. Vitamin D played a critical role in the maintenance of a calcified skeleton in vertebrates as they left their calcium-rich ocean environment for land over 350 million years ago.

Vitamin D can only be synthesized via a photochemical process so early vertebrates that ventured onto land either had to ingest foods that contained vitamin D or had to be exposed to sunlight to photosynthesize vitamin D in their skin to satisfy their body's vitamin D requirement.[12]
[edit] Production in the skin
In the epidermal strata of the skin, production is greatest in the stratum basale (colored red in the illustration) and stratum spinosum (colored light brown).

Vitamin D3 is made in the skin when 7-dehydrocholesterol reacts with ultraviolet light (UVB) at wavelengths between 270 and 300 nm, with peak synthesis occurring between 295 and 297 nm.[13] These wavelengths are present in sunlight when the UV index is greater than three and also in the light emitted by the UV lamps in tanning beds. Tanning lamps produce ultraviolet primarily in the UVA spectrum, but typically produce 4% to 10% of the total UV emissions as UVB. At this solar elevation, which occurs daily within the tropics, daily during the spring and summer seasons in temperate regions, and almost never within the arctic circles, vitamin D3 can be made in the skin. Depending on the intensity of UVB rays and the minutes of exposure, an equilibrium can develop in the skin, and vitamin D degrades as fast as it is generated.[14]

The skin consists of two primary layers: the inner layer called the dermis, composed largely of connective tissue, and the outer, thinner epidermis. Thick epidermis in the soles and palms consists of five strata; from outer to inner they are: the stratum corneum, stratum lucidum, stratum granulosum, stratum spinosum, and stratum basale. Vitamin D is produced in the two innermost strata, the stratum basale and stratum spinosum.


In some animals, the presence of fur or feathers blocks the UV rays from reaching the skin. In birds and fur-bearing mammals, vitamin D is generated from the oily secretions of the skin deposited onto the fur and obtained orally during grooming.[19]

In 1923, it was established that when 7-dehydrocholesterol is irradiated with light, a form of a fat-soluble vitamin is produced. Alfred Fabian Hess showed "light equals vitamin D."[20] Adolf Windaus, at the University of Göttingen in Germany, received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1928, for his work on the constitution of sterols and their connection with vitamins.[21] In the 1930s he clarified further the chemical structure of vitamin D.[citation needed]


Vitamin D is formed just under the surface of the skin, if its exposed to UV rays, but there are co factors involved to insure optimal production and absorption. The oil on the surface of the skin along with bacteria, kind of form a protective layer of cholesterol rich co factors that are necessary for optimal vitamin D production. If you constantly wash away the layer of protective oil and bacteria on the surface of the skin then whatever vitamin D that does form just under the surface will be reduced, or leach out and not be fully adsorbed.
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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #238 on: April 01, 2011, 06:18:22 am »
I'm sure I'm vitamin D deficient but I don't think that is the sole or primary cause of these skin problems, as they have just started and I haven't made an effort to secure my vitamin D status at all my entire life.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #239 on: October 03, 2011, 11:25:32 am »
Overdue update: started school, things going ok, a bit overwhelmed with classes+teaching+lab work but I'm getting used to it

I have a faculty member talking about doing a raw meat study but it's actually about getting less energy from the meat raw in an effort to control weight. Seems misguided from my perspective but still interesting. The younger people (mostly PhD candidates vs. long term faculty) are more open to my ideas. I wish I had the journal articles and critiques of some articles available at all times to aid me in my discussions as most of the faculty pretty much buy into the "vegetarian is healthier" kind of studies results. I'm pretty certain they didn't go back and look into the raw data like Denise Minger did on the China Study, and at this point I don't have the time to really compile all of that.

There is one faculty member who although he doesn't believe what I'm talking about yet seems to have taken a liking to me personally and might be willing to bring me into his lab and fund some of my research. So for the next few months I'm going to be trying to get good grades, learn lab techniques (in rotations) and present some clear testable hypotheses that this guy would be willing to do.

I was thinking of doing something with giving people fructose vs. glucose and measuring weight and blood outcomes. Giving people a certain amount of animal fat (tallow maybe) vs. equi-caloric something else. I'd like to attack the "animal fat causes heart disease" hypothesis head on if I could.

Suggestions?

P.S. anyone remember hearing something about Eskimos dying of stroke because of too high omega 3 levels from too much fish in their diet? If I could get some medical records showing that they are having stroke because of bleeding and not because of clotting I could write a review of that.

Offline wodgina

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #240 on: October 03, 2011, 05:59:24 pm »
Good to hear you're doing something you're interested in.

I've slowly managed to get into a health related occupation. I  was working in the environmental field however lost passion. Now I'm working in occupational health.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2011, 03:09:44 pm by TylerDurden »
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Offline Ioanna

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #241 on: October 04, 2011, 01:15:33 am »
kyle, you are going to do these studies with human subjects??

re heart disease... it would be interesting if you did a side-by-side comparison with the animal fat and a plant fat source(s).  peanut oil, for example, is used to induce atherosclerosis in rats for study... not animal fat :)


Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #242 on: October 04, 2011, 10:02:46 am »
kyle, you are going to do these studies with human subjects??

The first studies are going to be small, simple and short term and yes probably on humans. The cooked vs. raw meat study starts tomorrow, on humans.

What do you think would happen in a side by side comparison with fats? Do you think the fact that the subjects are eating "junk" and are only being supplemented with this extra fat would mess up the results?

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #243 on: October 04, 2011, 03:26:25 pm »
The trouble with a short-term raw-meat study is that it is, usually, going to show negative effects for those eating raw-meat. The reason  is that many people build up huge amounts of toxins after eating cooked foods for decades, so that they often have a detox for some days/weeks after switching suddenly from cooked to raw. My own experience was that I got constant diarrhea for 2 to 3 days solid, forcing me to go to the toilet every 15-30 minutes. If I had stopped at that point, out of timidity, I would never have gotten the health-improvements I experienced some months later.
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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #244 on: October 05, 2011, 06:17:03 am »
I wouldn't be so fast to state "why" there may be a difference between short and long term performance. I do agree that long term diet studies are more informative if you're talking about health intervention studies. If you're just looking at calories absorbed though it seems pretty straight forward.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #245 on: October 05, 2011, 02:08:59 pm »
I wouldn't be so fast to state "why" there may be a difference between short and long term performance. I do agree that long term diet studies are more informative if you're talking about health intervention studies. If you're just looking at calories absorbed though it seems pretty straight forward.
  Not necessarily. I think it takes time for the body to adjust re switching suddenly to a mostly raw or mostly cooked diet.  For example, I am pretty sure, given my own experience, that the body needs to produce much less stomach acid when eating mostly raw foods. I also noticed that, after going mostly raw, I found it more difficult to swallow very dry pastry like croissants usually needing to gulp some water shortly afterwards to wash them down, yet in my cooked food days I could swallow any number of them with ease. I  suspect(?) that this is because cooked diets encourage the creation of  more mucus etc. in the throat.
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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #246 on: October 08, 2011, 10:47:58 am »
I  suspect(?) that this is because cooked diets encourage the creation of  more mucus etc. in the throat.

That might be something to look into. Kind of impossible though to get funding for that and volunteers that wouldn't cheat.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #247 on: October 08, 2011, 02:06:03 pm »
That might be something to look into. Kind of impossible though to get funding for that and volunteers that wouldn't cheat.
True. Plus, I seriously doubt that a raw-meat-consumption trial would be allowed to last very long, given irrational fears re bacteria etc.
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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #248 on: October 09, 2011, 07:30:31 am »
True. Plus, I seriously doubt that a raw-meat-consumption trial would be allowed to last very long, given irrational fears re bacteria etc.

If you did it in a clinical setting you could probably get away with keeping it going as long as the subjects were monitored and showed to not have pathogenic bacteria problems. However, this would be expensive and therefore unlikely to happen.

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: my so called journal
« Reply #249 on: October 09, 2011, 11:09:21 am »
However, this would be expensive and therefore unlikely to happen.

You got that right, IMO.  My guess is, around the time that medical science has cured all the major aging diseases (heart disease, cancer, etc.), we'll see studies about RAF. And then, it won't even matter.


 

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