Author Topic: What is the Instincto explanation for acquired tastes?  (Read 4386 times)

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Offline bharminder

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What is the Instincto explanation for acquired tastes?
« on: January 10, 2011, 02:08:44 pm »
Let's consider all the foods we're discussing are paleo foods.

How would an Instincto explain acquired tastes? That is, initially something may taste bad but after several samples over a period of time a person starts to not mind the taste of the food and eventually may come to enjoy it. If a person is following their instinct, they would never go past the first meal of that food and therefore would never develop the acquired taste. But not every food that requires an acquired taste is necessarily a bad food.....or would an Instincto say that the food is bad- for that person in that moment?

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: What is the Instincto explanation for acquired tastes?
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2011, 05:20:24 pm »
Let's consider all the foods we're discussing are paleo foods.

How would an Instincto explain acquired tastes? That is, initially something may taste bad but after several samples over a period of time a person starts to not mind the taste of the food and eventually may come to enjoy it. If a person is following their instinct, they would never go past the first meal of that food and therefore would never develop the acquired taste. But not every food that requires an acquired taste is necessarily a bad food.....or would an Instincto say that the food is bad- for that person in that moment?
The idea behind Instincto is that, on a cooked/processed- and/or non-palaeo diet, one's tastes/instincts are warped and unnatural. The idea is that once one eats rawpalaeo, one's tastes become more natural, and one starts instinctively going in for the right foods. I don't think it's all as simple as that, as one's tastes/instincts are partly determined in the womb plus there is the epigenetic effect from one's parents living on SAD diets. But the general notion makes sense as there are addictive opioids in dairy/grains and in cooked foods in general, given scientific evidence, so instincts/tastes would be warped on such non-RPD diets.
« Last Edit: January 10, 2011, 08:38:26 pm by TylerDurden »
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Offline Iguana

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Re: What is the Instincto explanation for acquired tastes?
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2011, 08:07:30 pm »
Let's consider all the foods we're discussing are paleo foods.

How would an Instincto explain acquired tastes? That is, initially something may taste bad but after several samples over a period of time a person starts to not mind the taste of the food and eventually may come to enjoy it. If a person is following their instinct, they would never go past the first meal of that food and therefore would never develop the acquired taste. But not every food that requires an acquired taste is necessarily a bad food.....or would an Instincto say that the food is bad- for that person in that moment?

I don’t know whether there are such tings as acquired tastes. I rather see that Neolithic and modern, processed, mixed, seasoned and cooked food deceive our instinct and may induce overloads in some nutrients. As long as there is such an overload, the instinct blocks the intake of further stuff containing the nutrients already in excess, but this blockage works properly with raw unprocessed stuff only – it doesn’t work correctly with processed and cooked stuff, allowing all kinds of overloads in a vicious circle.

So, if someone is under a protein overload due to massive cheese and cooked meat consumption, for example, raw meat and raw fish will remain unattractive until that overload is expunged, which wouldn't take much longer than a few days. The same applies for carbs: raw sweet potatoes and wild fruits will taste bad or won’t be edible in normal amounts as long as someone is under a carb overload.

Another point is that there are cultural and psychological blockages. We have to overcome these kind of blockages to be able to appreciate some foodstuff.

A third point is that something never eaten before can trigger a strong and perhaps dangerous reaction of elimination of other doubtful molecules having been accepted because there was nothing better available. So it’s better to start eating it in small amounts to avoid such a dangerous shock-reaction and therefore the taste of it will gradually improve along with the body's ability to handle it safely.

So, I don’t think “acquired taste” is a suitable terminology because the taste of something is always variable, like the speed of a vehicle.

The idea behind Instincto is that, on a cooked/processed- and/or non-palaeo diet, one's tastes/instincts are warped and unnatural. The idea is that once one eats rawpalaeo, one's tastes become more natural, and one starts instinctively going in for the right foods.

I would rather say that everyone’s alimentary instinct is always operational, but it doesn’t work properly with processed food and, as I said above, when there is an overload it blocks the intake of any raw stuff bound to aggravate this overload.

Quote
I don't think it's all as simple as that, as one's tastes/instincts are partly determined in the womb plus there is the epigenetic effect from one's parents living on SAD diets. But the general notion makes sense as there are addictive opioids in dairy/grains and in cooked foods in general, given scientific evidence, so instincts/tastes would be warped on such npn-RPD diets.

Toxins are transmitted form the mother to the embryo and child through the placenta and milk, but according to the experience the baby alimentary instinct nevertheless functions pretty well.
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

 

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