Author Topic: School killings  (Read 23829 times)

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Offline Brad462

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Re: School killings
« Reply #75 on: December 21, 2012, 06:31:28 pm »
Why is columbine survivor mark taylor being held against his will and forcibly drugged?

http://columbinefamilyrequest.org/mark-taylor-defense-fund/mark-taylor/
I'm actually a really nice guy, once you get to blow me.

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Offline Paleo Donk

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Re: School killings
« Reply #76 on: December 21, 2012, 11:38:20 pm »
Theres also this other troubling idea I have with concealed carrying in that there could be a so called 'vaigra' effect where those carrying or more likely to find something to f*** up than those not carrying. I think there's a good chance that having a gun makes one more likely to find a reason to use it and then go back and justify those means. The killing of Trayvon Martin is perhaps a perfect example. I'm unclear of the details but the killer could have likely taken a different path to confront the teenager if he wasn't carrying. I cannot see how having a gun does not consciously or subconsciously change a person's actions when it comes to confrontations.

This story illustrates my point well - http://blogs.miaminewtimes.com/riptide/2012/12/after_shooting_a_whiney_costum.php

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: School killings
« Reply #77 on: December 22, 2012, 02:33:22 am »
There was a huge outcry re the Trayvon Martin case solely because he was black. It turned out later that the perp was a criminal and had certainly been up to no good at the time. Even worse, the US media tried to lie and portray it as an illegal attempt by a white person  to commit a vigilante act on  a supposedly innocent black person. Yet it quickly turned out that the "white" vigilante was actually mixed-race, once his photo was made available to the public,  and yet they still insisted on him being called "white hispanic" when "Hispanic" was the correct term.
I love that "stand your ground" law. I wish I could have used it in the UK against a couple of teenaged boys who fled after burgling my home.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2012, 03:00:35 am by TylerDurden »
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Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #78 on: December 22, 2012, 02:39:38 am »
I read that the shooter was a vegan.  Maybe instead of blaming guns we should blame fruit for this tragedy.
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Offline Iguana

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Re: School killings
« Reply #79 on: December 22, 2012, 03:17:42 am »
I read that the shooter was a vegan.  Maybe instead of blaming guns we should blame fruit for this tragedy.
Wheat, coffee and dairy, not fruits !

Quote
Trigger Foods and Opioids

Pieces of milk and wheat proteins (peptides) can act like the body's own narcotics, the endorphins, and were described by Zioudro, Streaty and Klee as "exorphins" in 1979. Other food proteins, such as gluten, results in the production of substances having opiate- (narcotic) like activity. These substances have been termed "exorphins." Hydrolyzed wheat gluten, for example, was found to prolong intestinal transit time and this effect was reversed by concomitant administration of naloxone, a narcotic-blocking drug. Digests of milk proteins also are opioid peptides. The brain effects of exorphins may contribute to the mental disturbances and appetite disorders which routinely accompany food-related illness. The possibility that exorphins are addictive in some people is a fascinating lead which needs further exploration.

Another mechanism, similar to dependency on food-derived neuroactive peptides such as exorphins, would be a dependency on gastrointestinal peptides, released from the bowel during digestion. Deficiencies in the bowel production of regulatory addictive peptides, such as endorphins, would likely be associated with cravings and compulsions to increase food ingestion. Eugenio Paroli reviewed the peptide research, especially the link between food and schizophrenia. He suggested: "The discovery that opioid peptides are released by the digestion of certain food has followed a line of research that assumes pathogenic connections between schizophrenic psychosis and diet."

Coffee and Tea

Coffee makes us speedy, irritable, sleepless, and often causes heartburn or ulcers. The removal of caffeine is supposed to reduce some of these undesirable effects. Coffee is an addicting beverage. If you consume more than 3 cups per day, you are likely to experience unpleasant withdrawal if you stop. The minimal suffering includes a headache, irritability, and fatigue. The popular idea that the bad effects of coffee are caused by one chemical, caffeine, is misleading. The 500 or so other chemicals in coffee include aromatic or phenolic chemicals and many are probably neurotoxic; other chemicals are allergenic. Coffee is also a crop with high pesticide residues. Coffee is definitely allergenic and makes some people obviously sick.
 

Quote
The origins of agriculture: a biological perspective and a new hypothesis
by Greg Wadley and Angus Martin
published in Australian Biologist volume 6: pp 96-105, June 1993

Pharmacological properties of cereals and milk

Recent research into the pharmacology of food presents a new perspective on these problems.
Exorphins: opioid substances in food

Prompted by a possible link between diet and mental illness, several researchers in the late 1970s began investigating the occurrence of drug-like substances in some common foodstuffs.

Dohan (1966, 1984) and Dohan et al. (1973, 1983) found that symptoms of schizophrenia were relieved somewhat when patients were fed a diet free of cereals and milk. He also found that people with coeliac disease -- those who are unable to eat wheat gluten because of higher than normal permeability of the gut -- were statistically likely to suffer also from schizophrenia. Research in some Pacific communities showed that schizophrenia became prevalent in these populations only after they became 'partially westernised and consumed wheat, barley beer, and rice' (Dohan 1984).

Groups led by Zioudrou (1979) and Brantl (1979) found opioid activity in wheat, maize and barley (exorphins), and bovine and human milk (casomorphin), as well as stimulatory activity in these proteins, and in oats, rye and soy. Cereal exorphin is much stronger than bovine casomorphin, which in turn is stronger than human casomorphin. Mycroft et al. (1982, 1987) found an analogue of MIF-1, a naturally occurring dopaminergic peptide, in wheat and milk. It occurs in no other exogenous protein. (In subsequent sections we use the term exorphin to cover exorphins, casomorphin, and the MIF-1 analogue. Though opioid and dopaminergic substances work in different ways, they are both 'rewarding', and thus more or less equivalent for our purposes.)

Since then, researchers have measured the potency of exorphins, showing them to be comparable to morphine and enkephalin (Heubner et al. 1984), determined their amino acid sequences (Fukudome &Yoshikawa 1992), and shown that they are absorbed from the intestine (Svedburg et al.1985) and can produce effects such as analgesia and reduction of anxiety which are usually associated with poppy-derived opioids (Greksch et al.1981, Panksepp et al.1984). Mycroft et al. estimated that 150 mg of the MIF-1 analogue could be produced by normal daily intake of cereals and milk, noting that such quantities are orally active, and half this amount 'has induced mood alterations in clinically depressed subjects' (Mycroft et al. 1982:895). (For detailed reviews see Gardner 1985 and Paroli 1988.)

Most common drugs of addiction are either opioid (e.g heroin and morphine) or dopaminergic (e.g. cocaine and amphetamine), and work by activating reward centres in the brain. Hence we may ask, do these findings mean that cereals and milk are chemically rewarding? Are humans somehow 'addicted' to these foods?

Everyone interested in paleo diet should have read the entire remarkable paper by  Greg Wadley and Angus Martin. The above quotes are only excerpts.
« Last Edit: December 22, 2012, 03:28:17 am by Iguana »
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline Brad462

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Re: School killings
« Reply #80 on: December 25, 2012, 01:59:21 am »
 ;D  It would be hilarious to see him get deported.  Fucking wanker.
US petition to deport Piers Morgan hits 31,400
http://news.yahoo.com/us-petition-deport-piers-morgan-hits-31-400-112219264.html
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Offline ys

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Re: School killings
« Reply #81 on: December 25, 2012, 02:56:48 am »
Quote
I think the solution rests with some new gun laws. For example no clips holding more than 10 bullets. Who needs 30 bullets in their clip any way? No automatic weapons, assault weapons, etc.

You are totally missing the point.  This is only treating symptoms, not the cause. This guy could have walked in with 6-round shotgun and kill as many defenseless people if not more.  A 12g buckshot shell is much deadlier in point blank range than 22 cal rifle bullet.  He'd have all the time in the world to keep reloading and no one would stop him.  It takes about 20 sec to reload 6 shells in the shotgun.  Maybe even less since he was carefully planning the whole thing.

Also, remember that guy in the 60's that killed 13 people and wounded more than 30 in Austin.  He used a low capacity bolt-action hunting rifle.

All those gun restricting laws are purely political BS.  They have no real effect on violent crime while depriving law-abiding citizens of their rights.

Quote
I think there's a good chance that having a gun makes one more likely to find a reason to use it and then go back and justify those means.

It's called being mentally unstable.  These kind of people should never be allowed to handle weapons unsupervised.  No sane person would ever use his weapon for any reason besides self defense.

Piers Morgan has unbelievably stupid face.

Offline Michelle

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Re: School killings
« Reply #82 on: December 26, 2012, 02:36:38 am »
Anyone else find it odd that one of the side effects of almost all anti-depressants is suicidal thoughts? That's something that has always set of a red flag to me. Maybe these medications dilute the fear the death, thus making these people more susceptible to either killing themselves or killing others. Who knows.

Most of my friends are taking zoloft and ativan, and they're all  in their early 20's, a naturally stressful time in most people's lives, including mine. I wish more people knew the importance of dealing with the source of their issues. Even doctors say that these drugs are not meant for life-long treatment, but how do they expect people to get off these things if all their issues come rushing to the surface the second they stop taking them? They also come with terrible physical and mental withdrawal symptoms. It's a total trap.

Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #83 on: January 07, 2013, 10:59:50 pm »
Cheers
Al

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: School killings
« Reply #84 on: January 08, 2013, 12:04:14 am »
Raw-al, that was hilarious.

It's becoming more and more true, though.  I've heard that the Oregon mall shooter wasn't able to kill very many people partly because the mall employees and customers knew how to respond.  People are starting to adapt to the reality of having a shooter show up. 

Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #85 on: January 08, 2013, 12:34:28 am »
CK, that was a good chuckle...

Here is an email I got from a 'southern boy' friend of mine that I worked with at one time. He and I exchange jokes. I have no idea if it's true and I don't have the time to check because I am using someone else's computer. I do not share his enthusiasm or his notions at all.

"  CONSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENT TO OWN A GUN

Vermont State Rep. Fred Maslack has read the Second Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, as well as Vermont 's own Constitution very carefully, and his strict interpretation of these documents is popping some eyeballs in New England and elsewhere.

Maslack recently proposed a bill to register "non-gun-owners" and require them to pay a $500 fee to the state. Thus Vermont would become the first state to require a permit for the luxury of going about unarmed and assess a fee of $500 for the privilege of not owning a gun. Maslack read the "militia" phrase of the Second Amendment as not only the right of the individual citizen to bear arms, but as 'a clear mandate to do so'.

He believes that universal gun ownership was advocated by the Framers of the Constitution as an antidote to a "monopoly of force" by the government as well as criminals. Vermont ’s constitution states explicitly that "the people have a right to bear arms for the defense of themselves and the State" and those persons who are "conscientiously scrupulous of bearing arms" shall be required to "pay such equivalent."

Clearly, says Maslack, Vermonters have a constitutional obligation to arm themselves, so that they are capable of responding to "any situation that may arise."

Under the bill, adults who choose not to own a firearm would be required to register their name, address, Social Security Number, and driver's license number with the state. "There is a legitimate government interest in knowing who is not prepared to defend the state should they be asked to do so," Maslack says.

Vermont already boasts a high rate of gun ownership along with the least restrictive laws of any state .... it's currently the only state that allows a citizen to carry a concealed firearm without a permit. This combination of plenty of guns and few laws regulating them has resulted in a crime rate that is the third lowest in the nation.

" America is at that awkward stage. It's too late to work within the system, but too early to shoot the bastards."

This makes sense! There is no reason why gun owners should have to pay taxes to support police protection for people not wanting to own guns.

Let them contribute their fair share and pay their own way. Sounds reasonable to me! Non-gun owners require more police to protect them and this fee should go to paying for their defense!"
« Last Edit: January 08, 2013, 02:40:06 am by TylerDurden »
Cheers
Al

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: School killings
« Reply #86 on: January 08, 2013, 12:47:26 am »
There's no way that's accurate.

Offline ys

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Re: School killings
« Reply #87 on: January 08, 2013, 03:21:46 am »
Awesome idea.  Swiss already have something similar.

Offline Projectile Vomit

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Re: School killings
« Reply #88 on: January 08, 2013, 03:47:33 am »
There's no way that's accurate.

The information is accurate, although quite dated. That bill was introduced over 10 years ago, and didn't go anywhere. In fact, it killed Maslack's political career. After introducing the bill around 2000-2001 he promptly lost his 2002 re-election bid despite being a long-time incumbent with the full support of the Republican Party. After the loss the Republicans wouldn't touch him and he tried to reclaim his seat in 2004 as an Independent, but failed. In 2006 he tried to run as a Republican again but couldn't even win the party's primary.

Here's another article that offers more information (from The American Prospect)

Quote
Vermonters have long stood behind their right to bear arms, boasting some of the highest rates of gun ownership and the least restrictive gun laws in the country. Currently the only state that allows its citizens to carry a concealed weapon without a permit, it may soon be the first to require a permit for the unarmed in its ranks. In what could be the most extreme interpretation of the Second Amendment's tricky syntax yet, a Vermont state legislator recently introduced a bill requiring all unarmed Vermont citizens to pay $500 for the privilege of not owning a gun.

Under the bill, adults who choose not to own a weapon would be required to register their name, address, Social Security number, and driver's license number with the state. Those of military age, with the exception of police and members of the armed forces, would be required to pay the $500 fine. Representative Fred Maslack proposed the bill not to encourage Vermonters to protect themselves against crime (Vermont's crime rate is very low), but to demand that citizens do their part in defense of liberty. According to Maslack, "There is a legitimate government interest in knowing who is prepared to defend the state should they be asked to do so."

But defend the state against what? Vermonters, Maslack told me, have a constitutional obligation to respond to "any situation that might arise." Federal tyranny? Yup. Abuse of power by other states? Sure. "There could be a natural disaster that would send thousands of people into the state." Maslack's implication seems to be that in the event of such an influx, Vermonters ought to be able to shoot anyone coming over the border on sight. Good thing New Hampshire's tsunami season is short.

It's true that the Vermont constitution states explicitly that "the people have a right to bear arms for the defense of themselves and the State" and that those persons "conscientiously scrupulous of bearing arms" shall be required to "pay such equivalent." And Vermont does have a proud history of citizen militias, going back to the days of Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. But citizens' armies have not been needed in Vermont since the early days of this country's founding, when they were occasionally called upon to send New York State tax collectors back over the state line. To refresh Vermonters' dormant militia expertise, Maslack has also introduced a bill requiring compulsory military training as a prerequisite for a high school diploma in the state.

More important to Maslack than safeguarding against excesses of government, though, is upholding the letter of the law. With Vermont in the spotlight over gay marriage, Maslack says members of his state should look more carefully at the rights and obligations spelled out in the Constitution. If homosexual couples can sue the state because they are denied the benefits that accompany legal marriage, he says, then surely someone can sue over the unheeded militia mandate. "You can't ignore the duties and invoke the privileges."

Given that Second Amendment enthusiasts speak as much about individual freedom as they do about the joys of hunting, it's unlikely that a bill requiring mandatory gun ownership will find a groundswell of support. (Determining whether everyone possessed a gun would require some form of gun registration, something NRA types staunchly oppose.) Still, all this begs the question: If Vermont recognizes gay marriage, and gays are barred from serving in the military, would Vermonters in same-sex marriages be exempt from militia duty?

Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #89 on: January 08, 2013, 05:20:47 am »
Awesome idea.  Swiss already have something similar.
Not.
They do not have an army but they have a citizen's militia. They are allowed to take their guns home but males are expected to join the militia between the ages of 20 - 30 where they undergo military training. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics_in_Switzerland

That's a big leap from every Tom, Dick and Jane in the US etc having a "ghee whiz, how do you use that thing anyhoo", "Which is the bang bang end?" arsenal.

You can probably tell my opinion on this topic LOL
Cheers
Al

Offline cherimoya_kid

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Re: School killings
« Reply #90 on: January 09, 2013, 12:01:50 am »
The information is accurate, although quite dated. That bill was introduced over 10 years ago, and didn't go anywhere. In fact, it killed Maslack's political career. After introducing the bill around 2000-2001 he promptly lost his 2002 re-election bid despite being a long-time incumbent with the full support of the Republican Party. After the loss the Republicans wouldn't touch him and he tried to reclaim his seat in 2004 as an Independent, but failed. In 2006 he tried to run as a Republican again but couldn't even win the party's primary.


The truth is truly stranger than fiction.

Offline ys

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Re: School killings
« Reply #91 on: January 09, 2013, 05:09:27 am »
Quote
They do not have an army

Looks like they do have professional army.  From your link:
Active personnel    134,886
Reserve personnel 77,000
Fit for military service    1,510,259 males, age 16–49 (2009 est.),
                                1,475,993 females, age 16–49 (2009 est.)

Full article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_army

Quote
"ghee whiz, how do you use that thing anyhoo", "Which is the bang bang end?"
The same applies to any tool, be it a simple screwdriver or chainsaw.

Here is something refreshing
http://hotair.com/archives/2013/01/06/mom-shoots-intruder-saves-kids/


Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #92 on: January 09, 2013, 09:25:58 am »
Looks like they do have professional army.  From your link:
Active personnel    134,886
Reserve personnel 77,000
Fit for military service    1,510,259 males, age 16–49 (2009 est.),
                                1,475,993 females, age 16–49 (2009 est.)

Full article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_army
The same applies to any tool, be it a simple screwdriver or chainsaw.

Here is something refreshing
http://hotair.com/archives/2013/01/06/mom-shoots-intruder-saves-kids/



Under structure it says

"The armed forces consist of 134,886 people on active duty (in Switzerland called Angehöriger der Armee, shortly AdA, engl.: Member of the Army), of which 4,230 are professionals, with the rest being conscripts or volunteers"

I think I would rather have someone come after me with a screwdriver or a chainsaw. At least the death toll would be significantly lower. A gun is such a cowardly device.
Cheers
Al

Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #93 on: January 10, 2013, 12:27:37 am »
This was part of a mailing from an organization called Fathers and Families. The organization is fighting for the rights of fathers in the family court system in the US against the overwhelming female presence in the court system and in the formation of laws at various levels of government and the education system.

Guns don't kill people — our
sons do
By Warren Farrell, PhD, member, Fathers and Families

We need to find ways to stop the childhood injuries that lead boys to murder.

Our daughters do not kill. Why the difference? For boys, the road to successful manhood has crumbled. It's time we go beyond fighting over guns to raising our sons.

After Newtown, Connecticut, parents cried out, "What's making our children kill?" But it is not our children who are killing. It is our sons. All but one of the 62 mass killings in the past 30 years was committed by boys or men.

We respond by blaming guns, our inattentiveness to mental health, violence in the media or video games, or family values. Yes, all are players, but our daughters are able to find the same guns in the same homes, are about as likely to be mentally ill, have the same family values and are exposed to the same violence in the media. Our daughters, however, do not kill. Why the difference?

Start with suicide. Each mass murder is also a suicide. Boys and girls at age 9 are almost equally likely to commit suicide; by age 14, boys are twice as likely; by 19, four times; by 24, more than five times. The more a boy absorbs the male role and male hormones, the more he commits suicide.

No manly model.

For boys, the road to successful manhood has crumbled. In many boys' journey from a fatherless family to an almost all-female staff elementary school such as Sandy Hook, there is no constructive male role model..

Adam Lanza is reported to have gone downhill when divorce separated him from his dad. Children of divorce without enough father contact are prone to have poor social skills; to struggle with the five D's (depression, drugs, drinking, discipline and delinquency); be suicidal; be less able to concentrate; and to be aggressive but not assertive. Perhaps most important, these boys are less empathetic.

And just while their bodies are telling them that girls are the most important things in the world, these boys are locked into failure. Boys with a "failure to launch" are invisible to most girls. With poor social skills, the boys feel anger at their fear of being rejected and self-loathing at their inability to compete. They "end" this fear of rejection by typing "free adult material" into Google and working through the quarter-billion options. Online "success" increases the pain of real world failure.

Fragile fantasy success.

So, too, with these boys' relationships with video games. While girls average a healthy five hours a week on video games, boys average 13. The problem? The brain chemistry of video games stimulates feel-good dopamine that builds motivation to win in a fantasy while starving the parts of the brain focused on real-world motivation. He'll win at Madden football, but participate in no sport.

It's time we go beyond fighting over guns to raising our sons. With one executive order, President Obama can create a White House Council on Men and Boys to work with the Council on Women and Girls he formed in 2009. Why? No one part of government or the private sector has a handle on the solution.

A coordinated strategy is best developed at the White House level. The mere formation of such a council by the president alerts foundations, companies, families, teachers and therapists that our sons' "failure to launch" needs to be on their agenda. And politically, an effort to go beyond the rote ideological disagreements of the two parties could help build the unity to actually do something instead of fight to a standstill in a closely divided country.

There are few things a culture does as important as raising children. We can't continue to fail half of them.

Warren Farrell is author of Why Men Are the Way they Are. He is co-authoring a book with John Gray, titled Boys to Men.
Cheers
Al

Offline Projectile Vomit

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Re: School killings
« Reply #94 on: January 10, 2013, 02:06:58 am »
Here's something similar, a blog post entitled There's Something Seriously Wrong with Men in America. Both make good points, but also make many generalizations.


Offline ys

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Re: School killings
« Reply #95 on: January 10, 2013, 02:20:55 am »
Quote
I think I would rather have someone come after me with a screwdriver or a chainsaw.

Screwdriver, you say?  That would be a very long and painful death.

Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #96 on: January 12, 2013, 04:00:21 am »
Here's something similar, a blog post entitled There's Something Seriously Wrong with Men in America. Both make good points, but also make many generalizations.
He starts off with some good stuff and then descends into the patriarchy nonsense and the male Gods trash.
Thanks Eric
Cheers
Al

Offline raw-al

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Re: School killings
« Reply #97 on: January 12, 2013, 04:11:04 am »
Here is some stuff I read from another place. Yet more conspiracy theories. This does not represent my views or any of my friends or relatives or my descendants  ;D

"NaturalNews) What was the most deadly element involved in the mass murder of 12 people and the wounding of 58 others at the packed Aurora, Colo., theater premier of the newest "Batman" movie last summer?

Was it the AR-15-type weapon used by James Holmes? The shotgun he had with him? The handgun he used?

No.

As it turns out it was probably a psychotropic medication he was most likely taking, a point raised by Natural News' Jon Rappoport in August, just weeks after the massacre. [http://www.naturalnews.com/036648_Dr_Lynne_Fenton_psychiatric_drugs_James_Holmes.html].

Holmes had been treated by a psychiatrist

The Denver Post reported Jan. 7 that, according to newly released court papers, police removed a number of prescription medication bottles - four, to be exact - from Holmes' apartment shortly after clearing it of explosives in the days following the July 20 shootings. They also seized immunization records.

"The disclosures come in a back-and-forth between prosecutors and defense attorneys over whether those items should be subject to doctor-patient confidentiality. The judge ultimately ruled in October that prosecutors could keep the items," the paper said, adding that the names of the medications had been redacted from court documents.

This shouldn't come as a huge surprise to anyone who's been following the correlation between these dangerous psychotropic drugs and mass murder. After all, earlier reports confirmed that Holmes was indeed being seen by a psychiatrist [http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/28/us/colorado-suspect-was-getting-psychiatric-care.html?_r=1&], so there's a better-than-average chance he, too, was on one of these dangerous medications.

The same is true in the most recent shooting tragedy. We know that the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooter, 20-year-old Adam Lanza, had psychological problems. We know, from what Louise Tambascio, a family friend of the shooter and his mother, told the CBS News program, "60 Minutes," that Lanza "was on medication and everything....I knew he was on medication, but that's all I know."

But what was he taking? What was Holmes taking? That we don't know - yet.

Like us David Kupelian, the managing editor for WorldNetDaily, is asking the right questions.

"It has been more than three weeks since the shooting. We know all about the guns he used, but what 'medication' may he have used?" he wrote shortly after the Lanza murders. "So, what is the truth? Where is the journalistic curiosity? Where is the follow-up? Where is the police report, the medical examiner's report, the interviews with his doctor and others?" writes David Kupelian at WorldNetDaily [http://www.wnd.com/2013/01/the-giant-gaping-hole-in-sandy-hook-reporting/]

And yet the national debate, if you can call it that, is focused strictly on the gun control and the Second Amendment, as evidenced by Vice President Joe Biden's declaration that President Obama plans to use executive power to implement new gun control regulations via the federal agencies that fall under the Executive Branch, and New York Gov. Mario Cuomo's promise to enact in his state the country's toughest gun control laws.

As usual, though, the corporate media has failed in its role as watchdog and truth-seeker. It has been left to alternative news outlets like ours and a few others to ask those probing, important questions: What kind of drugs were Holmes and Lanza taking? Who prescribed them? And these questions: What are some of the side effects of those medications? Can such medications cause patients to become violent?

The medications-equals-violence link is well-established

Here's why it is vitally important for Americans to know what kind of medications Lanza and Holmes were taking - because of earlier, high-profile cases involving guns and psychotropic medications:

-- Columbine killer Eric Harris was taking Luvox which, like similar drugs Prozac and Zoloft are widely prescribed antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs. Luvox manufacturer Solvay Pharmaceuticals admitted that every 1 in 25 patients taking the drug developed mania, a dangerous condition leaving the patient violence-prone.

-- Patrick Purdy went on a shooting rampage in a schoolyard in Stockton, Calif., in 1989, an incident that triggered the initial push to ban "assault weapons." Purdy, who killed five and wounded 30, had been taking the antidepressant Amitriptyline and the anti-psychotic drug Thorzine.

-- Fifteen-year-old Kip Kinkel killed his parents in 1998 then went to his school, Thurston High in Springfield, Ore., the next day and fired on his classmates, killing two and wounding 22 more. He was on Prozac and Ritalin.

There are many, many more examples, but you get the point: There exists a distinct link between psychotropic drugs and violence, yet virtually no one in the public policy realm or the media (both of which depend on Big Pharma for donations or advertising dollars) wants to talk about it.

Sources:

http://www.denverpost.com

http://www.infowars.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.wnd.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/038629_James_Holmes_prescription_meds_vaccines.html#ixzz2HaC1DYee "
Cheers
Al

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: School killings
« Reply #98 on: January 14, 2013, 05:12:53 am »
While just a joke doing the rounds, it does rather summarise the typical anti-gun/Pro-Liberal approach very well:-

"The Big Difference
So what’s the difference between a Liberal, a Conservative and a Southern Conservative?

You’re walking down a deserted street with your wife and two small children. Suddenly, an Islamic terrorist with a huge knife comes around the corner, locks eyes with you, screams obscenities, praises Allah, raises his knife, and charges you and your family.
FYI: You’re carrying a concealed 9mm and your wife’s carrying her 38 Special. You’re both expert shots. You have only seconds before he reaches you and your family. So, what would you do?

... A Liberal’s answer: “I don’t have enough information to answer that question!” For example:
Does the man look poor or oppressed? Have I ever done anything to him that would inspire him to attack us? Could we run away? What is my wife thinking? What psychic impact will this have on my kids? Could I possibly swing my gun like a club and knock the knife out of his hand? What does the law say about this situation? Do our pistols have appropriate safety features? Why am I carrying a loaded concealed weapon anyway? What kind of message does this send to society and to my children? Is it possible he'd be satisfied just killing me? Does he definitely want to kill me, or would he be content just to wound me? If I were to grab his knees and hold on, could my family get away while he stabs me? Should I call 9-1-1? Why is this street so deserted? Is this our fault? We shouldn’t have come this way! We need to raise taxes and clean up this neighborhood! We need to make this a happier, healthier street that would discourage terrorist behavior! I need time to discuss this with some friends and try to come to a consensus of opinions! I’m confused!

A Conservative’s answer: BANG!

A Southern Conservative's answer: BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! Click..... (Sounds of reloading) BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! BANG! "
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline Brad462

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Re: School killings
« Reply #99 on: January 14, 2013, 07:54:32 am »
Here is some stuff I read from another place. Yet more conspiracy theories. This does not represent my views or any of my friends or relatives or my descendants  ;D


There isn't one witness that reported seeing the supposed Sandy Hook shooter kill anybody...  How can you be so sure what happened?  I guess I am one of those weirdos who doesn't believe everything the T.V. tells me...   l)

"Once again a government funded mock emergency drill was being conducted at a nearby local school at the very same time the supposed realtime shooting was taking place at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut – leaving all the fingerprints of a government staged false flag event to strip guns from the American people.
 http://theintelhub.com/2013/01/12/sandy-hook-shooting-active..."

http://www.dailypaul.com/269994/sandy-hook-shooting-active-shooter-drill-confirmed-by-law-enforcement-raises-suspicion-of-false-flag-operation
« Last Edit: January 14, 2013, 08:01:49 am by Brad462 »
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