Author Topic: pig organs  (Read 4481 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline svrn

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,884
    • View Profile
pig organs
« on: December 25, 2012, 05:04:07 am »
i found some pork that doesnt get any grain at all and it tastes great and makes me feel incredible. Im still a bit squeamish about the pig organs though. anyone eat these before? How are they?
-----------

Offline cherimoya_kid

  • One who bans trolls
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 4,513
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2012, 01:56:05 pm »
Healthy diet=healthy pig=healthy organs.  As long as the pig is eating a good diet, and isn't exposed to lots of environmental toxins, you should be fine.

Offline Iguana

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,022
  • Gender: Male
  • Eating tuna fish
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2012, 02:41:52 am »
What are those pigs fed with?  -\
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline svrn

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,884
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2012, 08:45:40 am »
nothing. they are left to fend for themselves on the land. i guess that means grass acorns root crops. he told me they also give em some stuff like whey.
-----------

Offline eveheart

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,315
  • Gender: Female
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2012, 09:55:54 am »
nothing. they are left to fend for themselves on the land. i guess that means grass acorns root crops. he told me they also give em some stuff like whey.

Does it strike you as odd that the farmer's "story" keeps changing? How did "nothing" turn into "stuff like whey?" Last time I looked at a pig pasture, there wasn't any whey on it. Whey is a liquid.
"I intend to live forever; so far, so good." -Steven Wright, comedian

Offline svrn

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,884
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2012, 11:59:30 am »
he said nothing in terms of grains and then added that they got whey. Either way, I think I am able to taste and feel whether or not certain foods are clean and this pork seems pristine to me just like the beef I get there
-----------

Offline Iguana

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,022
  • Gender: Male
  • Eating tuna fish
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2012, 03:09:20 pm »
Either way, I think I am able to taste and feel whether or not certain foods are clean and this pork seems pristine to me just like the beef I get there

You'd be very lucky if "able to taste and feel whether or not certain foods are clean" because after decades of 100% raw paleo we are still unable to do that. Even the ones on raw paleo nutrition ever since their birth are unable to perform such a task.  Animals obviously can't either.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2012, 11:49:08 pm by Iguana »
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline Eric

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,002
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • EricGarza.info
Re: pig organs
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2012, 11:05:52 pm »
Accidentally posted this on another thread, when I meant to post it here:

Pigs are omnivores, so they aren't eating just acorns, roots, etc. They're eating rodents, amphibians and reptiles if they can find them, insects, all sorts of things. Pigs carry a lot of parasites, including some (tapeworms, a few large nematodes, others) that tend to become pathogenic in people. We don't have the history with pigs that we have with grazing animals that has allowed us to adapt to many of their parasites so they don't become pathogenic.

Read about a serious condition called cysticercosis, as an example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cysticercosis
Eric Garza
Check out my podcast, YouTube channel , and website

CitrusHigh

  • Guest
Re: pig organs
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2012, 01:14:37 am »
I agree with you Iguana in the sense that if these pigs were getting a few handfuls of soybeans each day, you probably wouldn't be able to sense that, and to me that would be something I wouldn't want in my pigs feed.

However, if you were to clone a sheep for example, and feed one offspring all conventional, and then let the other free range on grass and forest, and everything else equal, in terms of handling, processing, etc I guarantee you will be able to perceive the difference, whether by taste, texture, appearance, odor, touch, or any combination thereof. And I think it's this second kind of cleanliness troll is talking about. If you're paying attention when dealing with differently reared animals over the years the patterns are easy enough to recognize. A friend and I were just discussing this recently.

I'm in california right now and it's been kind of a bitch to get grassfed meats in my budget, but only because the nature of my visit has prevented me from investing the usual amount of time I'd put in to sourcing quality food. So I ended up buying some conventional meat, I mean the bottom of the barrel for a while for my dog just to keep him fed. I haven't dealt with that kind of meat in a long time. I see when I go in to the supermarket, but haven't handled it much in the last 4 years or so. I immediately noticed a few things. The meat look devitalized, was soft and squishy instead of resilient, had a mildly foul odor, was slimy, and just 'looked' unhealthy. I've noticed this for years with meat, eggs, dairy, fruits, veggies, herbs, there is a recognizeable pattern when something is of quality. Not something that would be easy to convey though, best learned through experience and one's own awareness and curiosity.

And what is at play here is that there is more toxicity, less vitality (literally: antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, etc) so the conventional meat breaks down a lot faster once cut off the animal because the cells of the flesh are less able to sustain and protect themselves from death/starvation/oxidation caused by the loss of blood-borne nutrients. There are other factors too, my grassfed meat tends to be fresher because of the nature of it and it's supply avenues, whereas most conventional meat, like what you'd get from safeway has been dead quite a while before it makes it to the shelf, and had god knows what done to it along the way.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2012, 01:38:58 am by Thoth »

CitrusHigh

  • Guest
Re: pig organs
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2012, 01:21:20 am »
In response to eric, there are those of us who have been eating raw pig for many years, organs specifically in my case, heart, liver, brain... all the parasite hot zones, with seemingly great results and no harm to speak of.

If you fear parasites then you should be worming yourself monthly because your way of life invites them. But they aren't the bad guys, you're barking up the wrong tree. And we've probably had a long ass history with pigs, we've probably been eating them all through evolution. It's absurd to claim otherwise.

Online TylerDurden

  • Global Moderator
  • Mammoth Hunter
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,993
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Raw Paleolithic Diet
Re: pig organs
« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2012, 02:44:39 am »
I know. There are far too few parasitic infestations reported by RVAFers for it to be considered a serious problem. And any symptoms tend overwhelmingly to be of a minor nature, easily fixed anyway with anti-parasitical drugs.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

CitrusHigh

  • Guest
Re: pig organs
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2012, 05:54:50 am »
Also, have you noticed that pig problems show up in people who are likely high in toxicity and very unhealthy to begin with. That is simply the trend you see. This creates an environment perhaps where eggs cross the blood/brain barrier more easily, or are not destroyed, or perhaps the brain calls in certain parasites, "hey, there's a bunch of shit to clean up in here, can you help?" parasite says "yeah, but the damage is extensive, too much work to do" and to make matters worse, the unwary person keeps living the life that brought them the trouble in the first place as opposed to say, immediately going on a highly available diet of raw high meat, pastured eggs, FCLO, whatever, etc . Too many variables, but that is the trend.

Offline Suoaei

  • Forager
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2012, 01:21:13 am »
I have eaten fresh raw pig heart and liver. I share them with my cat :) The heart has almost a crunchy texture, but the flavor is just like meat.  I sometimes mix it in with a pork sirloin dish, can barely tell it's there.
I actually have quite a strong craving for the liver--it smells really good for me--but I can't stand to chew it just yet. So I actually swallow the pieces with some raw milk. I know it's supposed to be better if you chew it, but the texture is so soft and the flavor so rich...I'm still squeamish about it.
In the past I have also eaten raw beef liver, I ate it every few days for almost a month. I swallowed that too, with lemon water.
It feels great and satisfies in a different way from muscle meats!

Offline svrn

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,884
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2012, 02:19:46 pm »
i think I can feel the difference between clean and unclean meat. I can actually feel pretty much every step a food item takes in my body and if something is making me feel bad I can feel exactly what it was. Dont believe me , see if I care :)
-----------

Offline Iguana

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,022
  • Gender: Male
  • Eating tuna fish
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #14 on: December 30, 2012, 04:04:20 pm »
Pigs are omnivores, so they aren't eating just acorns, roots, etc. They're eating rodents, amphibians and reptiles if they can find them, insects, all sorts of things. Pigs carry a lot of parasites, including some (tapeworms, a few large nematodes, others) that tend to become pathogenic in people. We don't have the history with pigs that we have with grazing animals that has allowed us to adapt to many of their parasites so they don't become pathogenic.

Read about a serious condition called cysticercosis, as an example: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cysticercosis
Eric, that’s a problem of domesticated animals fed wheat, heated, processed food and cooked leftovers as well of wild animals having access to our garbage.

Hundreds of “instinctos” in Europe have been eating pork and pigs organs ever since around 1970 and I’m not aware of a single case of parasites infestation with that. But those pigs were raised and fed exclusively with raw food and without any wheat.

 
I agree with you Iguana in the sense that if these pigs were getting a few handfuls of soybeans each day, you probably wouldn't be able to sense that, and to me that would be something I wouldn't want in my pigs feed.

However, if you were to clone a sheep for example, and feed one offspring all conventional, and then let the other free range on grass and forest, and everything else equal, in terms of handling, processing, etc I guarantee you will be able to perceive the difference, whether by taste, texture, appearance, odor, touch, or any combination thereof. And I think it's this second kind of cleanliness troll is talking about. If you're paying attention when dealing with differently reared animals over the years the patterns are easy enough to recognize. A friend and I were just discussing this recently.
Yes, it’s likely that you can perceive a difference between meats if one of the animals has been really, really badly fed. But otherwise we can’t until we have digested it, experienced nightmares and got unwell next. That’s the real problem. 
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 04:12:31 pm by Iguana »
Cause and effect are distant in time and space in complex systems, while at the same time there’s a tendency to look for causes near the events sought to be explained. Time delays in feedback in systems result in the condition where the long-run response of a system to an action is often different from its short-run response. — Ronald J. Ziegler

Offline svrn

  • Mammoth Hunter
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,884
    • View Profile
Re: pig organs
« Reply #15 on: December 31, 2012, 03:22:55 am »
I can feel the entire process that a food takes in my body, all the way up to a pin in my leg or nightmares and know why it happened. As far as how accurate my feelings are and how low the levels of poor feed I c an dtect this I do not know. I just think if my senses tell me its good enough then it probably is.
-----------

 

SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk