Author Topic: 'Genetic Roulette' Movie  (Read 1702 times)

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Offline raw-al

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'Genetic Roulette' Movie
« on: February 10, 2013, 07:39:29 am »
In case you haven't figured it out yet GMO's are a bad idea.

http://www.responsibletechnology.org/posts/genetic-roulette-free-screening/
Cheers
Al

Offline Eric

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Re: 'Genetic Roulette' Movie
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2013, 12:31:15 am »
This is a very well done documentary, although it wanders a bit in places and the editing makes some of the points a little less clear than they could be. I'll be showing it in one of my classes this semester, perhaps both of them.

Offline raw-al

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Re: 'Genetic Roulette' Movie
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2013, 12:32:54 am »
Which class?
Cheers
Al

Offline eveheart

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Re: 'Genetic Roulette' Movie
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2013, 02:54:26 am »
Follow-up to ballot initiative mentioned in the last 10 minutes of the video:  excerpt from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/07/prop-37-defeated-californ_n_2088402.html

Quote
California voters rejected Prop 37, which would have required retailers and food companies to label products made with genetically modified ingredients.

Millions of dollars, mostly from outside of California, were poured into campaigns both for and against Prop 37. But the donations that came in weighed heavily in favor of Prop 37's opponents.

Companies like Monsanto and The Hershey Co. contributed to what was eventually a $44 million windfall for "No on Prop 37," while proponents were only able to raise $7.3 million, reports California Watch.

Still, despite the lopsided campaign funding power, voting on Prop 37 was relatively close. As of this story's publish time (98.5 percent of precincts reporting), Prop 37 was able to gain 47 percent of California's vote.

Opponents of Prop 37 blitzed California with campaign ads on a variety of different reasons GMO labeling would be costly for consumers and punitive to businesses like small farms and mom-and-pop stores. The anti-Prop 37 movement also gained endorsements from prominent publications like the Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle -- not necessarily because the newspapers were against GMO labeling, but because of the way the ballot initiative was written.

Meanwhile, Prop 37 found supporters among celebrities, the restaurant world and food movement activists like Michael Pollan. In a piece for the New York Times, Pollan hailed its potential for igniting a nationwide debate about the industrial food complex:

Already, Prop 37 has ignited precisely the kind of debate -- about the risks and benefits of genetically modified food; about transparency and the consumer’s right to know -- that Monsanto and its allies have managed to stifle in Washington for nearly two decades.
If California had passed Prop 37, it would have been the first state in the U.S. to pass GMO labeling legislation. China, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, countries in the European Union, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Russia, India and Chile are just a few of the nations that already require GMO foods to be labeled.
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Offline Eric

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Re: 'Genetic Roulette' Movie
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2013, 04:01:45 am »
Which class?

I show it this week in my Toxics Policy and the Public class, and will probably show it later this semester in my Scale in Food Systems course.

 

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