Author Topic: bacteria strains?  (Read 2919 times)

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Offline TheWayCreatesTheWarrior

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bacteria strains?
« on: January 11, 2009, 11:46:21 pm »

does anyone know the main types of bacteria present on raw meat, and their effect in the intestines?

i just ask because in conventional health Acidophilus is always talked about like its the main bacteria in the intestines and therefore most Probiotics are based on it. but ive been wondering for awhile about the bacterias found on meat.
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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: bacteria strains?
« Reply #1 on: January 12, 2009, 04:00:33 am »
The bacteria present on meat would have to do with two things: 1) the bacteria that are around to stick to it and start trying to grow and 2) whether they can grow on it.

I found this article in my University search engine, see what you think of it:

http://www.jstor.org/pss/3859434

Offline donrad

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Re: bacteria strains?
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2009, 06:38:47 am »
Fresh raw meat from organically raised free range animals eating a natural diet should not have any bacteria. The animal's immune system will destroy bacteria.

If the animal is raised in factory like conditions (as almost all meat sold in grocery stores in the U.S. is); and slaughtered on assembly lines - there is a good probability the animal will be raised on antibiotics and may be infected with all kinds of bacteria. This is why they have to keep it refrigerated and sell it quickly.

Please use caution. Buy organic, freeze it, dry it, consume it quickly before the bacteria multiply, or cook it to 160 degrees.

Our Paleo ancestors did not have refrigeration or cooking utensils. They probably either consumed it quickly or dried it. I'm not sure, but I think they may have smoked dried it. Smoke is a preservative and fly repellent. All they had to do all day is hunt and gather and they were as intelligent as we are today (if not more so), so I am quite sure they were very good at it.

I personally like to dry my meat using a good quality forced air dehydrator with the thermostat set at 95 degrees. It preserves well and if dried completely and I think it preserves the nutrients quit well. Cold smoking adds great flavor, the enjoyment of which most people seem to have inherited.

 
Naturally, Don

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: bacteria strains?
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2009, 10:27:46 pm »
Well, grassfed meat will still have bacteria as it doesn't have an antibiotic effect but the bacteria will not be of a harmful nature, generally.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2009, 10:44:43 pm by TylerDurden »
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Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: bacteria strains?
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2009, 02:48:03 am »
No meat has bacteria in it (unless the animal is sick) until it's cut away. Then all meat has bacteria on/in it, whether it's all natural or not. All that matters is the bacteria flying around the room while the meat is being cut. The knife itself inserts bacteria into the cut that is made as well.

Bacteria doesn't come from the meat, it comes from the air and things touching the meat, then grows on the meat.

 

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