Author Topic: Self-Teaching Martial Arts  (Read 21878 times)

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Offline akaikumo

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Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« on: July 10, 2008, 08:37:20 pm »
For those of us who can't afford to pay for martial arts lessons (or at least right now), anyone have any websites/videos to share?

I'm against using gym exercises or standard push-up, sit-up kinds of exercises. I think the muscles that get developed look strange and unnatural. I eventually want to do a martial art, but it's expensive, and my physical abilities (aka: lack thereof) would make it a complete waste of money for at least a few months. I found an Iaido website a year or so ago, worked with it a little, and saw results.

It's obviously not as good as going to a dojo, being trained by someone who knows what the hell they're doing, and having a sparring partner; but it's better than nothing (that said, I'm also looking into isometrics and running).
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anais Nin

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2008, 12:47:13 am »
There are a lot of Brazilian jiu jit su videos on the various video sites (youtube) and also there are sites you could google "Brazilian jiu jit su techniques" to find videos on as well for free.

My recommendation would be to find a partner and drill the techniques you find with them. You can also find videos on boxing techniques, some of which you can do alone and some you would need a partner.

In my opinion the key to learning martial arts is to practice with a partner in real time or near real time (if the technique is too dangerous to do full speed). It's also the best way to train your body. Grappling for instance is just as effective as training with weights; perhaps even more so because it's constant pushing against a force (your partner).

Offline akaikumo

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2008, 06:27:39 am »
Unfortunately I don't know anyone else interested in it, so I'm going to have to make do with whatever solutions I can come up with until I meet someone or save up for lessons. :-\ But I'm not expecting to be able to defend myself, so it'll work for now.

Thanks for the recommendation; I'll check around for videos.
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anais Nin

Offline Realist

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #3 on: July 20, 2008, 07:47:08 am »
I think if you've got access to nature nothing beats rock climbing.

Otherwise, or additionally, you might find something at dragondoor.com They put a lot of emphasis on the benefits of strength training over bodybuilding, and they have a limited range of martial arts and qigong material.

Satya

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2008, 11:58:55 pm »
For those of us who can't afford to pay for martial arts lessons (or at least right now), anyone have any websites/videos to share?

I'm against using gym exercises or standard push-up, sit-up kinds of exercises. I think the muscles that get developed look strange and unnatural. I eventually want to do a martial art, but it's expensive, and my physical abilities (aka: lack thereof) would make it a complete waste of money for at least a few months. I found an Iaido website a year or so ago, worked with it a little, and saw results.

It's obviously not as good as going to a dojo, being trained by someone who knows what the hell they're doing, and having a sparring partner; but it's better than nothing (that said, I'm also looking into isometrics and running).

I highly recommend Shaolin Kung Fu Fundamental Training dvd.  I own this one, and while I focus on taekwondo training presently, this dvd is well worth the $59.  Dr. Yang knows his stuff and teaches well.  The program would take a long time to master, so it is worth the money.  It's 3 hours of instruction.

http://www.amazon.com/Shaolin-Kung-Fundamental-Training-Jwing-Ming/dp/B0007XW5XK/ref=pd_bbs_sr_4/002-5577723-4799228?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1216569309&sr=8-4

Offline akaikumo

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2008, 08:07:56 am »
I don't have the money for it now, but it's certainly something I could save for.

Rock climbing--definitely have access to it, being in Colorado, but I can't say I've ever rock climbed before.
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anais Nin

Satya

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2008, 05:22:29 am »
Two more options come to mind:

1. youtube actually has a few instructional video clips, at least in kung fu.  It's worth a search of many styles to see what's out there for free.*

2. Consider asking about bartering services for martial arts instruction.  If you'd be willing to paint, clean, provide a website, or other things that might be up your alley, you might get a certain number of classes or an indefinite arrangement.

* There's a hilarious martial arts movie spoof on youtube called Kung Pow.  It has several episodes, but you'll want the full screen version, as the widescreen has scenes missing (like a fight between the lead and a dairy cow).  You may have to search around, I think it's in 7 parts.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2008, 05:35:48 am »
Whenever I hear about martial arts, there are only 3 styles mentioned which are serious:-

The first is "Wing Chun Kung Fu"

The 2nd is "Brazilian Ju-Jitsu", as practised by the Gracie Brothers(avoid all other schools).

The best of all is Ninjutsu, as practised by the great sensei, Hatsumi:-

"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2008, 06:36:02 am »
Whenever I hear about martial arts, there are only 3 styles mentioned which are serious:-

The first is "Wing Chun Kung Fu"

The 2nd is "Brazilian Ju-Jitsu", as practised by the Gracie Brothers(avoid all other schools).

The best of all is Ninjutsu, as practised by the great sensei, Hatsumi:-



What about Greco-Roman boxing and wrestling, muay Thai, judo, sambo and kyokushin karate? To me those in addition to Brazilian jiu jit su are the serious ones because they are used in fighting. Most of the other martial arts can be seen on youtube having their practitioners being knocked out or choked out by a practitioner of one of the above arts.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2008, 06:39:53 am »
I was told once that, during a trial, it was found that "Norse Wrestling" was found to  be superior to ALL other martial arts, except when on the ground. As regards Gracie Ju-Jitsu, most practitioners state that, once on the ground, you have no chance whatsoever against an experienced Gracie-Ju-Jitsu opponent.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2008, 06:43:54 am »
*I've heard that Greco-Roman wrestling/boxing was superior to all other martial arts other than Norse Wrestling(though it wasn't as good as judo etc., when on the ground). hat do you think about "Savate" - that's one of the martial arts that my father taught me, other than Judo!!!
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #11 on: July 24, 2008, 08:25:07 am »
How would Norse wrestling not be good on the ground?

Anyway I train at a Gracie jiu jit su school and I'd say it's all the same really. The best guy right now in the world uses a sambo ground fighting style and a combination of muay Thai and Greco-Roman boxing with Greco-Roman and judo style takedowns. But there are other great fighters that are primarily Brazilian jui jit su fighters, muay Thai fighters, Greco-Roman wrestlers/boxers.

I'd say overall Brazilian jui jit su (also known as Gracie jiu jit su) is probably the best style in that more top level fighters use it, but what happens if you can't take your opponent down to the ground? If someone has the ability to counter your takedowns then it doesn't matter how good your jiu jit su is, you'll have to know how to strike in order to compete.

But as far as top fighters in the world go I've never seen a top fighter claim kung fu, savate or any other system other than the ones I talk about as their base. Whether or not they are good systems they just have not fostered fighters the way the others have.

Satya

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #12 on: July 24, 2008, 10:03:35 am »
Whenever I hear about martial arts, there are only 3 styles mentioned which are serious:-
...

All systems are artificial and have strengths and weaknesses, as do the people who practice them.  Let me offer an analogy from the world of music, which I do not claim to practice except vocally rarely, yet I do enjoy it profoundly. 
Instruments = Martial Arts Systems
Musicians = Martial Artists

Shall we now rank instruments based on the skill level needed to play them?  Or perhaps the sound that emanates from them?  And who is to judge?  The musician or the house to which he plays?  In any of these cases, for example, let us pit the piano against the violin and bag pipes.  Still, we cannot make a sound judgment, because the skill of the musician will figure into the equation quite prominently, as will his choice of music to play.  Not only is skill involved, but also there are physical attributes that will determine who is to be better skilled.  For a pianist with short, fat fingers is doomed, while the one with long, slender fingers will master that particular instrument with much more ease.  Then comes preference of instrument, which may be based on such things as the music style that is preferred.  Then we can also consider the construction of the instrument, which will affect the sound that is produced!

So the martial arts style(s) of practice that one choose(s) is(are) based on many things.  Mastery of a system is not always a function of desire and training time; as flexibility, strength and other factors will come into play.  Sex, size, power and other factors figure in as to which martial art(s) one can play (if you will).  A small woman may need to train for kicking and hand techniques for disarmament.  Is this contrived fighting in a ring where sex and size are pretty-well matched or is it deadly serious, to the death type of fighting against any opponent with any weapon(s) for which the training is designed?  These are extremely important considerations as well.  If the former ring fights, then, for example I may perform specific techniques for the ring to earn trophies and medals, yet I may lose my life in a real battle.  Why?  Because I may not be able to gouge your eyes out, break your knee, or smash your nuts for a trophy; and if that is all I train for, then I will not automatically go for the weaker tissues in a real fight, because that is not what my training focus has been.  The rules of engagement are as old as these (ultimately) military systems are themselves, and they do matter greatly in many respects.  Also, if there is a better technique, use it (just as if there is a better brand of flute, or a different way of blowing that makes it better).  Do what Bruce Lee suggested: take the best of all styles in the way that you can in the body you inhabit. 

Is there a better martial art system?  Is there a superior musical instrument?  Based on the physics alone?  I think not.

In short, it is all somewhat subjective.  It is when the musician becomes one with the instrument and becomes the beautiful song in the ears of the (optional) enraptured listener that all else dims.  It is the same when mastery in the martial artforms studied becomes a natural, beautiful extension of oneself.  Then there is no technique, no style, as it is a unique performance experience of oneness.  Style superiority becomes a moot question.

« Last Edit: July 24, 2008, 09:41:41 pm by Satya »

Satya

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #13 on: July 25, 2008, 08:27:35 am »
You know, not only are all the styles derivatives of eachother, but they all derive from yoga and Bhoddidharma (sp?) coming to China from India.  Not only that, any transmission of any art takes on the style of the artist, much the same way that the same symphony played on the sames instruments with different musicians and conductors will change.  Thus, it is not always true that the students of a certain school will always teach exactly as they learned.  Minor changes will be apparent.  So the actual school or style might be likened to a work such as Beethoven's 7th symphony, but the execution of it will depend upon human factors.

I learn hapkido in my dojang, which stems from jujutsu, which stems from the Samurai.  Dynamic!  Though some would question different lineages.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2008, 10:06:50 am by Satya »

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2008, 10:08:00 am »
I read that the Bodidharma brought those teachings to China from India and that he got them originally from when Alexander the Great conquered much of India and taught the population Greek Pankration.

Also muay Thai claims a 3000+ year history which would make that older than the Bodidharma's travels. My history is sketchy on the other historical claims. It seems to me that the Greek Olympics were the first competition grounds for martial arts and that most things resembling Greco-Roman boxing, wrestling and Pankration which involved kicks/takedowns/submissions is probably mostly from Alexander the Great's spreading of Greek culture.

Offline akaikumo

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2008, 08:27:52 am »
2. Consider asking about bartering services for martial arts instruction.  If you'd be willing to paint, clean, provide a website, or other things that might be up your alley, you might get a certain number of classes or an indefinite arrangement

Someone really might be willing to do that? I'd absolutely be willing to do it. :P
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. - Anais Nin

Satya

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #16 on: August 16, 2008, 07:17:31 pm »
Watch Jackie Chan get his butt kicked by Hapkido GM Hwang.  BTW, he is the same guy who is billed as a "Japanese fighter" in Bruce Lee's "Way of the Dragon," also featuring Chuck Norris.  He is Korean and is using Korean skills, not kung fu.  It's in Chinese, but you'll figure out what's going on ... they don't talk much anyway.  It's about 10 minutes long.

http://www.eaglehapkido.com/young-master-clip1.php

There are other movie clips on his site too.

« Last Edit: August 16, 2008, 07:23:41 pm by Satya »

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2008, 11:52:07 pm »
My favourite Jackie Chan movie has to be Drunken Master, all about a kung fu folk hero who practised a style of drunken kung-fu:-

http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj4GJfPsk6o&feature=related
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Sentient Primate

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #18 on: August 17, 2008, 10:44:11 pm »
For those of us who can't afford to pay for martial arts lessons (or at least right now), anyone have any websites/videos to share?

I'm against using gym exercises or standard push-up, sit-up kinds of exercises. I think the muscles that get developed look strange and unnatural. I eventually want to do a martial art, but it's expensive, and my physical abilities (aka: lack thereof) would make it a complete waste of money for at least a few months. I found an Iaido website a year or so ago, worked with it a little, and saw results.

It's obviously not as good as going to a dojo, being trained by someone who knows what the hell they're doing, and having a sparring partner; but it's better than nothing (that said, I'm also looking into isometrics and running).

Hi akaikumo & all,

 :)

Here is a link to something that might be of interest. It is more to do with street combat (a major interest of mine) than with martial arts, but I think it might help you on your way.

http://www.streetfightsecrets.com/

I hope it is acceptable to post direct links like this. If it is not, please advise.

Highest regards,

Steve

Offline TylerDurden

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #19 on: August 17, 2008, 10:50:44 pm »
It's perfectly OK to provide such links.  It's less OK to provide whole reams of text from other websites, as there've been concerns re copyright.
"During the last campaign I knew what was happening. You know, they mocked me for my foreign policy and they laughed at my monetary policy. No more. No more.
" Ron Paul.

Offline Raw Kyle

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #20 on: August 17, 2008, 11:49:05 pm »
It is my strong opinion that any martial art, "street" or "traditional" that doesn't have any grappling in it is a terrible idea for any realistic situation.

Sentient Primate

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #21 on: August 18, 2008, 12:08:41 am »
It is my strong opinion that any martial art, "street" or "traditional" that doesn't have any grappling in it is a terrible idea for any realistic situation.

Hello Kyle,

 :)

Kyle, are you responding to my recent post on the subject? I agree with what you say. Perhaps you got the impression grappling is excluded from the material presented on the website I gave the link for. Grappling is not excluded.

Highest regards,

Steve

Offline ezekiel

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2008, 12:53:43 am »
I believe when it comes to combat you must not limit yourself with only striking techniques and only grappling techniques. I use whatever is effective in combat. I call grappling...grappling, not BJJ. I call punching...punching , not boxing. And so on.... As far as ninjistu goes. That is more along the line of stealth combat i think..... No mattter, I just use what will be effective in hand to hand combat, groin grabbing and hair pulling are not fowl to me, because I practice martial arts as an art, and not a sport.

Sentient Primate

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #23 on: August 20, 2008, 01:59:45 am »
I believe when it comes to combat you must not limit yourself with only striking techniques and only grappling techniques. I use whatever is effective in combat. I call grappling...grappling, not BJJ. I call punching...punching , not boxing. And so on.... As far as ninjistu goes. That is more along the line of stealth combat i think..... No mattter, I just use what will be effective in hand to hand combat, groin grabbing and hair pulling are not fowl to me, because I practice martial arts as an art, and not a sport.

Spot on Sully!  ;)

Steve H

Offline ezekiel

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Re: Self-Teaching Martial Arts
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2008, 04:00:21 am »
Spot on Sully!  ;)

Steve H
Nice to hear (read) someone agrees ;)

 

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